Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,626 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We all know that water & electricity don't mix, but what about water and EVs?

Driving through flooded and unlit roads this morning, I found myself wondering... How long before it cuts out? Most of the time you don't see a flooded section until you hit it, and you have no idea how deep it is.

I know that an ICE suffers the same problem, but the lowest possible point of failure with an ICE is near the top of the engine bay, either at the air intake or the control systems.

With an EV, the lowest possible point of failure is the motor, which sits in the middle of the axle...

Worse, flood damage generally uninsured and not covered by warranty.

Anyone had any first hand experience of taking an EV through a ford or flood?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,626 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Excellent video! Thanks for posting. Trying to find more of the same :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,346 Posts
I've never treated it any different to any other car -- ie deeper=slower and usually wouldn't go above 6 inches or so slowly - can lose grip even slowly.

The HV system is well protected, but remember the 12V system is not (ie battery etc)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,892 Posts
@NissanGB posted over on Leaftalk that the max water depth is 30cm - though that seems to be more about stopping water coming in through the doors than anything else. Usual cautions about checking brakes afterwards etc. apply.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,030 Posts
I was told by the salesman at Toomey that the Leaf was the ideal car to drive through a flood because everything was sealed in.

Pass the salt...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
If I remember well, Robert Llewellyn was the only person in his neighbourhood who was able to drive after the flood with his leaf.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,030 Posts
That looks as though the Range Rover has driven off the road.

In February last year a friend and I were out on my tandem and we came across some flood water, right across the road for about 150 metres and of unknown depth. We watched it suspiciously until a white van came along. It was clearly not more than half-way up his wheels so since my tandem has bigger wheels we set off.

Everything was going very smoothly until the front wheel dropped into a submerged pot-hole and we stopped dead. We had to put our feet down and my left foot then found another rather deeper hole than I wanted, tilting the tandem to one side to the effect that my lovely stoker was almost thrown headlong into a very full ditch. Luckily she kept her balance and dignity and we waded/paddled back to "dry" land, both shaking with laughter. We were both more than a little soggy so headed back to the station and my house for a change of clothes. It was not warm - we passed the remains of a number of slowly thawing snow-men as we progressed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Not all the motors are sealed, some do rely on air cooling. WIth more and more going the liquid cooling route, all should be well. But the lowest part of the car is generally the Battery pack, and whilst the cells would not be real problem the lower power /voltage BMS could. But the battery packs are generally sealed. It only takes a small amount of water leak to cause havoc. I had a Berlingo electrique, Its controller is fully sealed and waterproof, but aparently not entirely proof against the use of pressure washers. A previous owner had used one, and managed to get a small amount of moisture in the control box. high voltage (160+) tracked across the ECU board causing a load of damage at component level.
Modern 12v systems are generally well sealed, but I did manage to get my Vacuum pump on my Smart (451 Conversion) under water and the main power failed. Its now moved higher in the car. It dried out and has worked OK since. I wont be wading either my Smart or the Citroen C1s as they do have air cooling to the motors. As do Gwiz, Aixam, Mega trucks, etc etc.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,856 Posts
300mm is quite good. Kangoo Z.E. is approved only to the lowest point on the van or about 185mm. (I asked)

300mm (about 12") is also the fording depth of a BMW X1. From memory most BMW cars are 250mm at a walking pace.

The X3, Freelander and current Defender are all 500mm. Depending on the year, a Defender can ford deeper water with a wading kit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
I managed to get water over the bonnet of my old range rover while going through a fairly flooded ford, water flooded in through the heater. We stopped the other side opened the doors, let the water run out at which point my 7 year old said, shall we not tell Mummy about this. Not an option with now saturated carpets. But it was great fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Mine had an Isuzu diesel in it. So would probably have gone all day underwater. But the old points V8 were pretty good at dealing with water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Going through water isnt just about depth, I took my old range rover through under 2ft on the water depth gauge on a small river, but with the range rover in the channel, it then rose and broke over the bonnet.The worst of this was it started to float and drift sideways. In general never go into water that you have not walked through, its impossible to see how deep the holes are in the river/ road etc, and this is especially the case with flood waters which can rip up a surface really easily. Fire engines are not allowed to go through greater than 400mm, which is about mid wheel.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top