Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner

41 - 45 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
There's a group of owners over on Facebook who our starting to post the range they are getting, 150-160 seems to be a common number at the minute and given the weather lately that's not bad at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
I had an e-208 for the day today. After a cheeky call to the dealership yesterday late afternoon, I was able to collect the car with a fully charged battery. The GOM was showing a hilarious 99 miles; which it continued to display for the first 50 miles of my drive. The temperature was a steady 8 degrees C.

In all I drove 73 miles with around 40 on A roads at 50-55 mph max, 25 on the dual carriage way at 70-75 mph and the rest around the city. This used a reported 45% of the battery which then took 24kWh (input energy recorded by my zappi) to charge back to full.

The car reported 3.4 m/kWh which seems to tally fairly accurately assuming charging efficiency (energy consumed when charging compared to energy ultimately stored in the battery) of 90% and usable capacity of 47.5kWh.

When extrapolated, this points to a total range of 160 miles. I wasn't trying to be particularly economical but I was restricted to some fairly efficient speeds for much of my journey. However, I definitely didn't hold back once I hit the dual carriageway. I'm confident that I could have saved a significant percentage of the battery (maybe 5-8%) by accellerating more gently and sticking to 60-65.

Driving a Leaf 40 in a similar way, I would expect to get around 130 miles and achieve a similar economy of 3.5 m/kWh. The Peugeot has a 25% bigger battery and seems to have pretty close to a 25% greater range.
73 miles at 24Kw is actually just over 3.04m/Kwh thats only actually about 144 miles of 'put in' electric. How many Kw do you see if you charge fully as I am not sure the 10% losses should be accounted for as you would then charge 52.25Kw to charge fully. Has anyone actually been able to do this yet? Not questioning figures just trying to make sure I am not looking through rose tinted glasses
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
73 miles at 24Kw is actually just over 3.04m/Kwh thats only actually about 144 miles of 'put in' electric. How many Kw do you see if you charge fully as I am not sure the 10% losses should be accounted for as you would then charge 52.25Kw to charge fully. Has anyone actually been able to do this yet? Not questioning figures just trying to make sure I am not looking through rose tinted glasses
I've not charged from empty, but I believe charge efficiency of 85-90% is pretty standard, although I believe it is non-linear as there may be greater losses towards the end of the charge. Yes, it would actually take around 52.7 kWh of input energy to charge the 47.5 kWh usable part of the battery, assuming you managed to run it out completely (and this may be some distance beyond which the car reports 0 remaining range). The car's own economy figures will not include the charging losses so 3.4 m/kWh relates to how much energy has been drawn from its battery. By my calculations, this was entirely accurate based upon the above assumptions. You're right that this would need adjusting if you wanted to calculate the actual running costs. My 24kWh cost 12.34p/kWh so around £0.04/mile (although 4% actually came from my solar panels, so approximately 3 miles for free*).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
I've not charged from empty, but I believe charge efficiency of 85-90% is pretty standard, although I believe it is non-linear as there may be greater losses towards the end of the charge. Yes, it would actually take around 52.7 kWh of input energy to charge the 47.5 kWh usable part of the battery, assuming you managed to run it out completely (and this may be some distance beyond which the car reports 0 remaining range). The car's own economy figures will not include the charging losses so 3.4 m/kWh relates to how much energy has been drawn from its battery. By my calculations, this was entirely accurate based upon the above assumptions. You're right that this would need adjusting if you wanted to calculate the actual running costs. My 24kWh cost 12.34p/kWh so around £0.04/mile (although 4% actually came from my solar panels, so approximately 3 miles for free*).
Sorry, wasn't doubting any figures, I just didn't realise the amount of losses were over 10%. If you recharged 50% of your battery daily for a year, this loss could be 700Kw, that £100 Uk . The Uk Govt and maybe other are also trying to sell the use of you car's charge to support the grid. The discharge losses could be 30%, i''l bet they don't include these figures when they give you something back.
It also means that many reports of people charging in other groups etc could be showing misleading figures unless they are using a DC charger.

The more I read, the more I enter the matrix
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Sorry, wasn't doubting any figures, I just didn't realise the amount of losses were over 10%. If you recharged 50% of your battery daily for a year, this loss could be 700Kw, that £100 Uk . The Uk Govt and maybe other are also trying to sell the use of you car's charge to support the grid. The discharge losses could be 30%, i''l bet they don't include these figures when they give you something back.
It also means that many reports of people charging in other groups etc could be showing misleading figures unless they are using a DC charger.

The more I read, the more I enter the matrix
Don't over-think it. Losses with fossil fuels are supposedly around 75%. Just know that real world costs of around 4p/mile are fairly standard for EVs charged at home or as low as 1.66p/mile with the cheapest night time rate.
 
41 - 45 of 45 Posts
Top