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I actually asked this embedded in another post. No response.

I see 3-8m type 2 extension leads for sale online. The type which you might plug into the end of your tethered cable to go a bit further. Not sure if I actually need or want one. However, weighing options.

Anyone know if any are safe and work? I read comments which make them seem like dodgy imports of highly questionable quality and they don’t necessarily work.
 

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I actually asked this embedded in another post. No response.

I see 3-8m type 2 extension leads for sale online. The type which you might plug into the end of your tethered cable to go a bit further. Not sure if I actually need or want one. However, weighing options.

Anyone know if any are safe and work? I read comments which make them seem like dodgy imports of highly questionable quality and they don’t necessarily work.
Well they won't work at all ( unless they have been bodged from the standard).
 

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What I should have said. Has anyone experience of an extension which is safe, quality and works!?

None are safe at all. The standard has been designed to stop extensions working for good safety reasons, and those that sell them bodge the plug end of the cable to get around the safety protocols that are built-in to the design, so creating a product that is both non-compliant and potentially unsafe.

Apart from anything else, the connectors don't have a high enough IP rating to be used horizontality mated like this, especially as the normal safety mechanism of the shorter CP pin has been defeated to make the cable work.
 

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Tbh from looking, I needed about 10-15m cable length from the charger (depending which way the cars parked) so I decided to go untethered so I could get 1 long cable.

If you already have tethered, the money you’d spend on a “decent” extension you might as well spend a little more and get a new longer tethered cable, then sell your old tethered cable. Including the price of a sparky to swap it over it’s prob a little more, but definitely the safer route.
 

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TBH, swapping the cable over on a tethered charge point is pretty much always a very easy job. Just isolate the supply, check that it's really dead, remove the cover from the charge point, and then take a couple of photos showing where the wires are connected (for reference). Loosen the four terminals for the charge cable (L, N and CPC) and also the thinner CP wire. Loosen the cable gland holding the cable in place, plus any securing clamps inside, then remove the old cable.

Refit the new cable exactly like the old one, making sure that there are cable ferrules crimped on the ends of the wires where they enter the terminals. The thinner CP wire on the new cable may be a different colour, but the L, N and CPC will always be brown, blue and green/yellow. Make sure the wire terminals are really tight, secure any cable grip and tighten up the cable gland. Before putting the cover back on double check all is OK, take another reference photo or two, and double check all the wires are tight, doing a tug test to make sure they really are secure in the terminals. Refit the cover, then turn on the power and test to make sure the new cable works OK.

At most it's about a 30 minute job, with most of that being spent getting the cover off and back on again usually (some can be a bit awkward, with lots of fasteners).
 

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Wallbox I wouldn’t fancy trying to change the lead as it already comes tethered and is behind a pcb so would have to remove a couple of things to get to it. Andersen had to be connected up during installation so would be easy enough to change. Not sure on other manufacturers, doing a hypervolt in the near future and will probably steer customers towards them as wallbox can be a bugger to get the cables terminated and are similar to wago connectors which never fills me with confidence.
 

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I am using a 10m Type2 extension cable with my tethered Ohme charger without any problems. I actually connected it permanently with a weathered housing.
Bought the item here: https://evcables.co.uk/index.php/type-2-extension-g3.html

Which is a wholly non-compliant bit of Chinese made tat that ignores all the safety requirements within IEC62196. If it carries any form of approval marks, like a CE mark, then they will be completely fake, as there is no way to safety approve a non-compliant product like this.

149500


When the connectors were designed a lot of thought went into the risks associated with extending them, given that they carry up to 32 A at mains voltage. That's why the pins and housing are designed so that approved connectors will not connect together to form a very dodgy extension lead, the only way to allow this work is to cut off material from the end of the socket, or extend the CP pin within the plug, to completely remove the inherent disconnect safety protection within the design.

They also have no form of latching, nor do they have any means of checking that the connectors are fully mated, so able to take the rated current, as the idiots that modified them did away with both the cable latch (to prevent accidentally disconnection and ensure connectors could not be powered up when not fully mated) and by modifying the CP pin length they removed the secondary safety protection against a partially mated connector overloading because the two aren't quite fully mated. The level of risk these things present is just wholly unacceptable - even the humble in-line Commando connectors have a crude latch to indicate they fully home and to make it harder to accidentally disconnect them slightly, causing arcing, overheating and potential damage to the equipment being supplied by spikes and surges from the arcing.

These things are simply unsafe, should not be sold and, IMHO, like all other very dodgy Chinese electrical crap should be forcefully removed from the market, and the sellers prosecuted for selling non-compliant and unsafe electrical equipment.

I would not buy anything from this company, simply because if it's prepared to sell one very dodgy and potentially very unsafe bit of Chinese crap here, what's the safety standards like of the other stuff they are using?

Finally, if you have a problem with the charge port, OBC etc on your car, and the manufacturer get to know that a non-IEC62196 lead has been used, when they almost certainly require that safety standards compliant leads be used, then I wonder whether they might honour any extended warranty claim?
 

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Jumping into this thread with a related question. I've got an untethered charge point. My car, when it arrives in 8 days will have a 4.5m cable. To avoid moving cars every time I want to charge on our traditional one in front of the other drive I need to get a 10m cable. I like the idea of this brightly coloured one for visibility as the charge side of the car is next to a footpath and I also don't want to trip the milkman. I was going to get this one, but am cautious about being non compliant and dangerous goods. Do you have an opinion on this @Jeremy Harris ? Or could you recommend an alternative?


10m cable

Thanks, I'm looking for cheap but safe.
 

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Looks OK to me. There generally isn't an issue with normal charge cables, that are intended to be used with an untethered charge point, as the socket on the charge point will have the connector latch, and the plug on the cable will have both the slot for that latch and the shorter CP pin that provides the safety protection if the connector isn't fully pushed home. Both of these provisions ensure that the cable cannot be energised unless the plug is pushed home into the charge point, and the socket is pushed home into the plug on the car.

The dodgy extension leads that are being sold by unscrupulous companies that have little regard for safety have neither of these essential safety features, hence the problem. I should add that this isn't an issue for the Type 1 to Type 2 adapters that are sold, as the Type 1 connector has both a latch and a safety microswitch activated by that latch, so the safety requirements are still met OK. The problem is specifically related to the dodgy Type 2 to Type 2 extension leads, that frankly should be just banned from sale.
 

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There are also type 2 to type 1 (type 1 at the car) extension cables/converters these have a non complient type 2 socket and could be pulled apart whilst charging :(
The T1 to T2 adapter (T2 car) was really designed and sold for US market where the T1 is the main type and on tethered points.
 
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There are also type 2 to type 1 (type 1 at the car) extension cables/converters these have a non complient type 2 socket and could be pulled apart whilst charging :(
The T1 to T2 adapter (T2 car) was really designed and sold for US market where the T1 is the main type and on tethered points.
Thanks, I'd forgotten those. The issue that concerns me is that it's hard to tell when one of these dodgy, non-compliant, and unsafe connectors is positively mated, or whether it may have partly pulled apart and be arcing internally under load. Arcing not only causes damage to the connector, it also creates nasty spikes and surges that may well cause damage to the car charger. There's only so much the protection and suppression circuitry in the charger will take, and because the IET feel that arc faults present a danger they are mandating that new installations in future will have to have Arc Fault Detection Devices (AFDDs). These are going to add a LOT to the cost of a new consumer unit in future, too, as AFDDs are pretty expensive devices right now.
 

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Looks OK to me. There generally isn't an issue with normal charge cables, that are intended to be used with an untethered charge point, as the socket on the charge point will have the connector latch, and the plug on the cable will have both the slot for that latch and the shorter CP pin that provides the safety protection if the connector isn't fully pushed home. Both of these provisions ensure that the cable cannot be energised unless the plug is pushed home into the charge point, and the socket is pushed home into the plug on the car.

The dodgy extension leads that are being sold by unscrupulous companies that have little regard for safety have neither of these essential safety features, hence the problem. I should add that this isn't an issue for the Type 1 to Type 2 adapters that are sold, as the Type 1 connector has both a latch and a safety microswitch activated by that latch, so the safety requirements are still met OK. The problem is specifically related to the dodgy Type 2 to Type 2 extension leads, that frankly should be just banned from sale.
Thanks for the reassurance. Order now placed. Just need the car now
 

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Which is a wholly non-compliant bit of Chinese made tat that ignores all the safety requirements within IEC62196. If it carries any form of approval marks, like a CE mark, then they will be completely fake, as there is no way to safety approve a non-compliant product like this.

View attachment 149500

When the connectors were designed a lot of thought went into the risks associated with extending them, given that they carry up to 32 A at mains voltage. That's why the pins and housing are designed so that approved connectors will not connect together to form a very dodgy extension lead, the only way to allow this work is to cut off material from the end of the socket, or extend the CP pin within the plug, to completely remove the inherent disconnect safety protection within the design.

They also have no form of latching, nor do they have any means of checking that the connectors are fully mated, so able to take the rated current, as the idiots that modified them did away with both the cable latch (to prevent accidentally disconnection and ensure connectors could not be powered up when not fully mated) and by modifying the CP pin length they removed the secondary safety protection against a partially mated connector overloading because the two aren't quite fully mated. The level of risk these things present is just wholly unacceptable - even the humble in-line Commando connectors have a crude latch to indicate they fully home and to make it harder to accidentally disconnect them slightly, causing arcing, overheating and potential damage to the equipment being supplied by spikes and surges from the arcing.

These things are simply unsafe, should not be sold and, IMHO, like all other very dodgy Chinese electrical crap should be forcefully removed from the market, and the sellers prosecuted for selling non-compliant and unsafe electrical equipment.

I would not buy anything from this company, simply because if it's prepared to sell one very dodgy and potentially very unsafe bit of Chinese crap here, what's the safety standards like of the other stuff they are using?

Finally, if you have a problem with the charge port, OBC etc on your car, and the manufacturer get to know that a non-IEC62196 lead has been used, when they almost certainly require that safety standards compliant leads be used, then I wonder whether they might honour any extended warranty claim?
That is interesting to read. How could one check whether or not these certifications are faked and the products unsafe. The seller seems to display the TUEV certifications and claims these are manufactured in the UK.
Clearly if this untrue I’d like to follow this up, but how can one proof this.
 

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That is interesting to read. How could one check whether or not these certifications are faked and the products unsafe. The seller seems to display the TUEV certifications and claims these are manufactured in the UK.
Clearly if this untrue I’d like to follow this up, but how can one proof this.

The seller does state clearly they are made in China on their website. You cannot certify a product that cannot, by it's design, comply with the safety standard that all these connectors are required to comply with, so any certification is fake.

IEC62196 does not include a connector that allows daisy chaining, because doing this is inherently unsafe. That's why there is a lock specified, to keep the connectors securely mated (and that is missing on these bodge jobs) and also why the CP pin is made shorter, as a safety provision that turn off the supply if the connectors are not both pushed fully home and locked securely so they cannot be pulled apart.

These cheats will use weasel words if challenged, and suggest that the cable is certified (it may well be) or that the connector at one end is (again it may well be). They can also hide behind the law that says you can sell anything, even if it's unsafe, because often the act of selling something isn't itself in any way restricted. For example, I own a HackRF software defined radio, that can transmit and receive on any frequency from 1MHz to 6GHz. It has a range of features, including GPS jamming, a key fob relay attack capability, the ability to transmit spoof messages to emergency service pagers, etc, etc. All these things are illegal, in some cases very illegal, in terms of the penalty they attract. However, I bought it legally, can own it legally and I am not breaking any laws or regulations if I only use it in receive mode (which is all I use it for).

The company that sold that cable haven't been entirely open about the fact that it is inherently unsafe, and that one of the modified connectors fitted to it does not comply with IEC62196, but they've not broken any law or regulation. They are no different to the many thousands of sellers on online stores selling unsafe goods with fake certification, and it's very rare for any of them to get so much as a slap on the wrist from anyone. Most of the time, Trading Standards either aren't interested or are too busy to do anything, and these companies know this.
 

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Feel free to quote anything, but sadly I doubt that you will get anywhere with them, as they aren't actually breaking any regs by selling them, even though the free plug on their cable cannot possibly comply with the required safety standards.

It's no different to all the many thousands of online sellers supply goods with fake 13 A plugs, that have no fuse, often have a shape that makes getting an electric shock pretty likely, and which are inherently dangerous, as they allow the full 32 A from a ring final to flow through a thin flex that may be rated at just 5 A or so. Our laws and regulations are effectively toothless when it comes to preventing the online sale of dangerous and unsafe goods here.
 

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@Jeremy Harris the laws aren't the problem - it's the enforcement (or rather total lack of it) - you could have the death penalty for most offences, the odds of being detected committing it are on a par with winning the lotto & Euromillions jackpots on the same night (even though they're drawn on different days)

I've often thought that a few dozen very well publicised Draconian sentences for dog fouling (for example) would go a long way... Crush untaxed cars at the roadside no excuse, absolute offence. Crush it there and then, then fine the perp for littering.
 
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