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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was researching a different topic the other day and came across different battery chemistries, with their pros and cons. If you can stand French English, here's the video:


But in short:

Boeing Dreamliner uses Li-ion Cobalt Oxide
The upside is that it's the highest energy density out there
The downside is that if the battery reaches the temperature of 170C, the Cobalt oxygen bound will break and will release a lot of heat, reaching 800C and being impossible to be put out - thermal runaway.

Tesla/Panasonic use Li-ion - Nickel - Manganese - Cobalt Oxide (NMC)
The upside: high energy density
The downside is that it still retains the thermal runaway, though more stable than Dreamliner's chemistry.

BYD uses Li - Iron - Phosphate (Li-FePO4)
The upside: no thermal runaway at all, constant discharge, fast charge and discharge
The downside: energy density is 30% lower than NMC and above 50C temperature the iron changes its structure, reducing the operation of the battery

Renault/Nissan use Li-ion - Manganese Oxide (Li-Mn2O4)
The upside: higher voltage, lower cost, thermally stable, high power
The downside: 20% less energy dense than NMC and above 55C temperature the Manganese breaks down/decays, reducing battery operation
 

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Very interesting. It raises the question of the battery chemistry being used in the hybrid aircraft and air taxis. At least you can exit a burning Tesla rather than a flying aircraft.
 

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Having a metal oxide in the same space as lithium is called 'a thermite bomb'. You gotta do it right, or POOOOFFFF! ;)

Boeing were supremely dumb. Li-F-Phosphate has 'technically' lower density but the difference after packaging is much less, and not needing any secondary containment means an LFP system is actually far more compact and lighter for a 'plane.
 
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