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I think it may be your insurance company that is underwriting your safety case?
Thanks Jonsel, we agree just a lot.

It always pays to understand what one is signing for and as an engineer, you should NEVER be underwriting a safety case.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #184
That well known friend of the fossil fuel industry, the International Energy Agency, has today said renewable energy would be the only growing source of energy this year. "We see a staggering decline across all the fuels: oil, gas, coal, electricity, except for renewables. The plunge will cut global carbon dioxide emissions to levels not seen since 2010, with an unprecedented drop of 8 per cent in 2020"

Bloomberg meanwhile has published a report which states that "solar PV and onshore wind are now the cheapest sources of new-build generation for at least two-thirds of the global population. Those two-thirds live in locations that comprise 71% of gross domestic product and 85% of energy generation. Battery storage is now the cheapest new-build technology for peaking purposes (up to two-hours of discharge duration) in gas-importing regions, like Europe, China or Japan."
 

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We will still need to manage more than 2 hour peaks but indeed it looks like it’s a clear progression on generation and storage.
Still need additional renewables technologies of course.
I know they’ve built a geothermal plant in the south west. Is it cost effective?
We also need to figure out how to power ships and planes without fossil.
 

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... there are old and inflexible nuclear plants that churn out between 3 and 6.5 GW ...
You're making 'old and inflexible' sound like a problem rather than a virtue!

I don't want my power supplies to be 'flexible' I want them to be solid deliverers of pure consistency!

You wouldn't put 'new and flexible' foundations under a bridge or Cathedral, would you?
 

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You're making 'old and inflexible' sound like a problem rather than a virtue!

I don't want my power supplies to be 'flexible' I want them to be solid deliverers of pure consistency!

You wouldn't put 'new and flexible' foundations under a bridge or Cathedral, would you?
Odd comment all round.

Customers turn appliances on and off. Yes you need your providers to be flexible. They need to meet customers’ needs.

And I don’t think we really need confirmation that the strongest foundations are built with flexibility to withstand shocks. Rigidity is brittle and causes failure.
 

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Odd comment all round.
Just a discussion.

Customers turn appliances on and off. Yes you need your providers to be flexible. They need to meet customers’ needs.
Yes, but there is always a minimum usage. So there should always be something 'ON' at the level of the minimum usage, no?

And I don’t think we really need confirmation that the strongest foundations are built with flexibility to withstand shocks. Rigidity is brittle and causes failure.
OK, well, I accept the semantics of that, but the 'flexibility' we were discussing was 'ON/OF' flexibility. I wouldn't want there to be such a switch on foundations to a building. Someone might decide to switch the support off.
 

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Discussion Starter #189
I note BP's new CEO has an entirely appropriate name:

“We've left our $500 million of low-carbon investment unchanged [and] untouched this year," BP’s new CEO Bernard Looney told investors on a Tuesday call. "Where we cut elsewhere, we did not cut that back. So we will, over time, be working hard to do more in that space.”
 

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Just a discussion.


Yes, but there is always a minimum usage. So there should always be something 'ON' at the level of the minimum usage, no?
In Ireland it is common that overnight when it is windy, the minimum stable generation of the thermal generators is so high that it forces them to curtail wind. There is a new paid service to get the thermal plants to have a lower minimum stable generation level. Baseload is dead: not needed any more.


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In Ireland it is common that overnight when it is windy, the minimum stable generation of the thermal generators is so high that it forces them to curtail wind. There is a new paid service to get the thermal plants to have a lower minimum stable generation level. Baseload is dead: not needed any more.


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There is also the bi directional cables that allow export to Wales and Scotland.
 

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There is a new paid service to get the thermal plants to have a lower minimum stable generation level. Baseload is dead: not needed any more.
Hold on with that emotive last line.

So you're saying that these stations still run down to a minimum, not 'OFF'? Their minimum is the base load, so clearly nor dead on that basis.

And, so are all thermal plants like this now? Certainly not in the UK, so how 'dead', yet?
 

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Hold on with that emotive last line.

So you're saying that these stations still run down to a minimum, not 'OFF'? Their minimum is the base load, so clearly nor dead on that basis.

And, so are all thermal plants like this now? Certainly not in the UK, so how 'dead', yet?
It's called spinning reserve. Burning fuel, no active KWs going out.
 

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In Ireland it is common that overnight when it is windy, the minimum stable generation of the thermal generators is so high that it forces them to curtail wind. There is a new paid service to get the thermal plants to have a lower minimum stable generation level. Baseload is dead: not needed any more.


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Hardly.

Ireland is a good example of a system in transition. Not only are renewables increasing (and great potential), but so is demand (unlike Britain). But it's also a grid burdened with significant coal, oil and peat generation. None of which like being turned down.

Gas is also a huge part, and will continue to provide both baseload and flexibility in the Irish grid will into the next decade.
 
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