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What grease I should buy to put on the strut before putting the 3D printed ebay cover on it? Where else can I use this grease? I've never done any car DIY........ only checking fluid levels and topping up washer fluid. I would like to start doing some simple jobs (I hear brake pad and disc change are one of easiest) on this Leaf. Because EV will be less messy right?
It's not worth buying grease just for this tiny job. I would just visit the service bay at Nissan and ask if they would let you have a finger full to apply to the dried and cleaned out strut top. Take a piece of greaseproof paper for that blob. In any case, it's not really necessary - just a good extra thing to do.

And please don't even consider playing with your brakes and discs. Especially with your rudimentary mechanical skills. Whilst they are fairly easy jobs to carry out compared to many others they are one of the most critical when safety is required. Done professionally the costs can be quite modest because they are fairly simple but with less chance of later problems causing a ditch encounter or worse.
 

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It's not worth buying grease just for this tiny job. I would just visit the service bay at Nissan and ask if they would let you have a finger full to apply to the dried and cleaned out strut top. Take a piece of greaseproof paper for that blob. In any case, it's not really necessary - just a good extra thing to do.

And please don't even consider playing with your brakes and discs. Especially with your rudimentary mechanical skills. Whilst they are fairly easy jobs to carry out compared to many others they are one of the most critical when safety is required. Done professionally the costs can be quite modest because they are fairly simple but with less chance of later problems causing a ditch encounter or worse.
Thanks for your pointers. I'm not on best terms with my local Nissan dealership, they are always trying to charge me for extra work.

Point taken on brakes. I am fully aware of their critical role in safety. I have done car maintenance as tool-fetcher under my old man in the 90's, including work on the brakes. I've just never worked on my own cars. Due to potential safety issues, I was going to ask my Dad to come over and watch over the job while I learn to do it.

Actually, I'll just get my Dad to bring over his can of grease when he next comes over.......
 

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Having downloaded a few 3D models of the strut covers, I decided to design and print my own very simple one. The downloaded ones were going to take 4 hours each to print and my design takes two. This is due to the very basic nature of my design, but they work just as well as any other ones. If anyone has access to a 3D printer, I can share the file on here? I can also print them for anyone local who wants me to.
 

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I just found a swimming pool too, ordered the cover. With regards the grease is that just to smear it around? Just to be totally daft what’s the purpose for this?
 

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I just found a swimming pool too, ordered the cover. With regards the grease is that just to smear it around? Just to be totally daft what’s the purpose for this?

I don't think there's any need to coat your strut top in grease:cautious: Dry it out with a paper towel or whatever and give it a few sprays of WD40 . I used a couple of round clear plastic single portion microwave rice containers I dug from the recycling bin to cap the struts.
Secured them with 3 blobs of silicone but left a wee gap for the air to circulate. Total cost - bugger all, and they've remained dry all winter. No need to complicate things;)
 

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Not sure what the problem with the blob of grease is. The purpose is so that water cannot pool in the recess (because the grease is already there). Job done. Plus, it excludes condensate from forming there, in cyclic conditions. Sounds much simpler than trying to glue home made parts to your car!
 

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I think whatever solution you come up with the main thing is to make sure any water is directed to the outside of the raised section of the strut tower and none gets into the strut assembly.
The rusty nut is not a major issue in in the grand scheme of things but trapped water leading to severe corrosion of the strut tower part of the bodywork could write the car off at a certain age :(
 

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The rusty nut is not a major issue in in the grand scheme of things ....
ppffffttt.. when the only means to apply counter torque is a pathetic 5mm Allen keyway that rounds out instantly, it sure is a heck of a problem!! ....Go buy yourself a whole strut!!
 

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A couple of photos of mine and the 3D printed covers bought from eBay (link in one of the earlier posts):
swimming_pool.jpg 3D_printed_cover.jpg inside_cover.jpg WD40.jpg

Cover fits very nicely. The first photo looks a little "blurry" around the nut because it is completely full of water.

Seems like a complete fail on the part of Nissan not to have included a cover!
 

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ppffffttt.. when the only means to apply counter torque is a pathetic 5mm Allen keyway that rounds out instantly, it sure is a heck of a problem!! ....Go buy yourself a whole strut!!


I truly don't want to stop you or indeed anyone smearing their nuts with grease if that makes them happy :)

I'm quite happy keeping my nuts dry however (save for a slight sheen from WD40 ) keeping the water out of the whole strut assembly is more important in my humble opinion.;)
 

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For me the issue is not keeping water out of the struts, the parts are easily replaced as long as the top thread hasn't rusted and seized. That has on several occasions, turned a 45 min job into a 3 hour marathon for me as I wrestle with a large corroded nut with all but a once-hexagonal hole to brace the torque against.

A corroding strut bearing is not a problem, it is merely a part to replace. A corroded top bolt is a problem.
 

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That has on several occasions, turned a 45 min job into a 3 hour marathon for me as I wrestle with a large corroded nut with all but a once-hexagonal hole to brace the torque against.
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Yup, I think most of us have had that rusty fixing that turned a seemingly simple job into a frigging nightmare, the joys of working on cars in the northern hemisphere .
I've had success holding a damper piston stationary while trying to turn the top nut by using a pair of vise grips with the piston's surface protected from the jaws by a thick section of rubber hose or whatever. Grips pretty well but you have to be careful with the pressure you apply to the rubber ( good advice for many activities in life )
 

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Yup, I think most of us have had that rusty fixing that turned a seemingly simple job into a frigging nightmare, the joys of working on cars in the northern hemisphere .
I've had success holding a damper piston stationary while trying to turn the top nut by using a pair of vise grips with the piston's surface protected from the jaws by a thick section of rubber hose or whatever. Grips pretty well but you have to be careful with the pressure you apply to the rubber ( good advice for many activities in life )
I think that is exactly what happened last time for me, IIRC. It required Stillson's and a bit of thick rubber sheet I had the fortune to have around, along with freeze-release spray (good stuff, that! get a tin for those difficult occasions) and a hot air gun.

Why can't these people just design in a couple of flats along the shaft somewhere? Who the F* thinks a coaxial M5 Allen key is adequate?

... (edit) just remembered that's how I broke the Stillson's and haven't replaced them yet. I wedged the handle into the spring and gave the nut the full berries, and the handle snapped off it! Fortunately it remained wedged and I completed the job. Good reminder for me to order a new Stillson's!
 

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This is really great advice guys, and a really useful thread I wish I had spotted years ago! Suffice to say mine are looking rather the worse for rust after 4.5 years (talk about shutting the stable door after the horse is miles away) but will remediate the best I can at the weekend to at least stop it getting worse. I hadn't even noticed the state of the strut tops as they're hidden under the bonnet; Nissan manage to spend money on plastic trim to hide them away but not a few pence more to actually protect them!
 

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And people resist putting a blob of grease on there to make a future mechanics job easier.
I'm pretty sure they don't care about the future mechanic. The attitude to a lot of things these days is "get it done and get the money". Nobody cares what the finished job quality is like any more.

Vinegar is a great release agent too. My wife tends to keep a stock in her cupboard. I don't know why she expects to be getting rusty bolts out!
 

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I sorted mine out this morning. Wow, the bolts were absolutely minging. I absorbed the water in the tops with blue roll, then applied a copious amount of ACF50 before fitting the plastic tops from eBay (that fitted perfectly).

This is a classic example of a few quid skimped during design that could end up costing a small fortune in a few years.
 
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