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I have a 66 plate and had a quick look to find no covers and water in the drivers side top mount. It only takes a few minutes to pop up the plastic trim and have a look.
That water comes from the brilliantly located drain hole in the driver side wiper spindle assembly that cleverly sends rainwater to cause a failure from rust over time. Incidentally, that same drain hole regularly gets blocked from tree debris causing water to overflow from the channel onto a module under the bonnet that can then fail. Double whammy.

The cure is to poke that drain hole clear from time to time and fit a cover over the strut top area to shed water away and down the interior wing to the ground. I used an upturned empty yoghurt pot that was a tight fit over the entire area and solved the strut problem cheaply and effectively. And as the drain hole is a bit difficult to locate I threaded a length of bell wire through and twisted it to stay there for next time the hole needed clearing out.
 

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I've just fitted the Golf Mk1 strut covers from here, Suspension Strut Top Mount Cover 17141235901C > Caddy , Golf Cabrio , Golf Mk1 | eBay - at £3.50 per side they were cheaper than the 3D printed ones at £15 each. An easy snug fit over the top of the strut.
I also discovered that the water wasn't draining away so attacked the area with an airline until it cleared and could then see where the drain hole is. The water flows freely out of the bottom of the wing now so hopefully that's avoided some problems in the future.
 

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Pull out the wheel arch liner and clear all the debris between the inner and outer wings at the rear corners. There are drain holes which can become blocked by all the debris washed down from the top, especially if you park under trees. I found a large stiff cable tie and a pressure washer (or a big hypodermic syringe full of water) soon cleared them without damaging the paint.
 

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30KW Tekna (2017)
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Pull out the wheel arch liner and clear all the debris between the inner and outer wings at the rear corners. There are drain holes which can become blocked by all the debris washed down from the top, especially if you park under trees. I found a large stiff cable tie and a pressure washer (or a big hypodermic syringe full of water) soon cleared them without damaging the paint.
any mor3 tips on how to do this for someone not that car savvy?
 

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Ok so after seeing my leafs drivers side mount still full of water I’m drying it today and fitting a yogurt pot cover.

There is a little rust on the nut, do I need to treat with anything to stop the rust as will it now keep rusting even though dry like ”metal cancer” or will a glob of grease and the cover stop further rust?
 

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There is a little rust on the nut, do I need to treat with anything to stop the rust as will it now keep rusting even though dry like ”metal cancer” or will a glob of grease and the cover stop further rust?
A good cleaning with a wire brush or small rotary wire brush in a drill to take away all loose rust - followed by a good covering of grease will be fine. The trick is to find a yoghurt pot that is a close push fit over the entire outer circular area. The caps that can be bought from 3D printers or VW caps don't do that. They just cover the inner area and then any rain dropping through that immaculately placed drain hole will still lodge in the entire outer assembly. I also jammed a suitably wedge-shaped piece of poly foam between the top of the yoghurt pot and the underside of the scuttle so that the pot couldn't shake loose during travel. On inspection a month later it hadn't moved and the area was still dry and grease protected.

As others have said, attention should also be given to the ultimate drain hole below the wing to make sure that the water is leaving the car as designed.
 

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A good cleaning with a wire brush or small rotary wire brush in a drill to take away all loose rust - followed by a good covering of grease will be fine. The trick is to find a yoghurt pot that is a close push fit over the entire outer circular area. The caps that can be bought from 3D printers or VW caps don't do that. They just cover the inner area and then any rain dropping through that immaculately placed drain hole will still lodge in the entire outer assembly. I also jammed a suitably wedge-shaped piece of poly foam between the top of the yoghurt pot and the underside of the scuttle so that the pot couldn't shake loose during travel. On inspection a month later it hadn't moved and the area was still dry and grease protected.

As others have said, attention should also be given to the ultimate drain hole below the wing to make sure that the water is leaving the car as designed.
Thanks for that! Today’s project then.....
 

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Thanks for this. Took a look at mine. They'd been given a shot of copper grease, but one was a puddle. Soaked up the moisture, gave them a good coating of chain wax and ordered a set of covers.
 

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That water comes from the brilliantly located drain hole in the driver side wiper spindle assembly that cleverly sends rainwater to cause a failure from rust over time. Incidentally, that same drain hole regularly gets blocked from tree debris causing water to overflow from the channel onto a module under the bonnet that can then fail. Double whammy.

The cure is to poke that drain hole clear from time to time and fit a cover over the strut top area to shed water away and down the interior wing to the ground. I used an upturned empty yoghurt pot that was a tight fit over the entire area and solved the strut problem cheaply and effectively. And as the drain hole is a bit difficult to locate I threaded a length of bell wire through and twisted it to stay there for next time the hole needed clearing out.
I have just looked at my wife's 64 plate Leaf and found the ubiquitous bird-bath full of water. Luckily for me I make beer at home and a bonus (apart from decent beer at very low prices) is that the plastic caps on the top of the cars of wort (see below) is almost exactly the correct size to cover the whole area. All that is needed is to trim out some tiny ribs from inside the caps and cut eight equally disposed slits in the 'skirt' of the caps to facilitate its clipping over the upstanding rim of the body pressing. I'll check them for position after a few runs and if they're still in place then I shall be a happy bunny!


Not the kit I use but the can is the same. 🍺
 

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Luckily for me, I make beer at home and a bonus (apart from decent beer at very low prices) is that the plastic caps on the top of the cans of wort (see below) is almost exactly the correct size to cover the whole area.
Why didn't I think of that? A much better source of aftermarket cover than my own yoghurt pots. Unless yoghurt can be used as a base ingredient to make beer that is.
 
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