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Hello everyone!

I'm wondering to buy a 2015 GTE. If I charge the battery to full and go on a highway/standard trips (for example 300 km) in hybrid mode only,
1. what average mpg will I use?
2. Will the battery be charged and/or discharged all the time like in a standard hybrid and maintain the battery by some itself, or will the car just discharge, then use a lot of petrol?
Maybe will it be only efficient on the first 100km, then eat all my petrol?
Everyone speak only about electric range, but I'm not clear with average hybrid-only mode consumption for longer roads.
I need a car for normal everyday use in city etc., but once a month I need to travel a 500 km trip, and I have to now how the car handles the mgp on those longer roads.
Thank you very much!
 

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Here's my pennyworth.

While running on electricity the car uses no petrol. While running in hybrid mode at motorway speed the mpg on my car is 45.

I normally run in e-mode until the battery is exhausted then in hybrid mode (without charging) for the rest of a long journey.

Actual electric range on a motorway is 15 winter and 20 summer.

So to calculate your expected overall mpg, just consider what proportion of the journey is electric and how much is hybrid.

E.g. In summer a 40 mile journey is half and half so 90 mpg. A 100 mile journey gives
45 X 100/(100-20) = 56 mpg.
And so on.
If I don't charge at the start of the journey I get 45 mpg. So that's the worst case.

I don't hypermile or race but the numbers will depend on your driving style. You can get your own no-electric mpg by running in hybrid only for a full tank then doing the calculation. Don't trust the electronic numbers from the car computer.
 

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So on your 500km journey day
You leave home, and if you don't touch any mode buttons, the following happens
1)The car drives in in default eMode, using electric only, for the first 40-45km - the battery range number drops to zero
2)At this point the car will start the petrol engine automatically
3)For the next few km the engine will run even if you come to traffic lights, a junction etc, it is in a "warm up mode"
In the summer I have seen this to be as low as 500-750metres ! Winter... 3-4km
4) Then for the next 10-20km the engine will be both driving the car, and , recharging the battery back up to show a range of about 4-5km. During this time the instant mpg or litre/100km will be terrible, but at junctions the engine will stop.
5) Then for the rest of your journey the car will act as a full hybrid, the drive train of both petrol + electric working well, and at very low speeds just electric power. During this phase the mpg on gentle driving can be high.

If you want to maximise economy then when you leave home put the car into Hybrid mode as soon as you know the engine can run under slight load for 5mins ( to put it into warm up without coming to a junction etc)
And then when you get near to your destination, put the car manually into eMode to use up the remaining battery. Aim being to arrive with maybe 1-2km left in the battery, you don't want to be in step 4 above.
The step 4 is fairly unique to the VW/Skoda PHEVs - I don't know of other PHEVs that do this (to this extent)

When I did this "button pressing" on any journey above eMode only distance, I can eek the uk mpg rate to 50-60mpg across the total trip. Motorways are a pain unless the traffic / roadworks mean 50mph max.
City centres are good but you have to be clever with the right foot to not wake the engine up if possible.

Leaving home and not pressing buttons, overall I'll got 45-50mpg - but very dependant on traffic load, types of road etc.
 

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If i know i have a bigger journey then the range of the car (40-45km) i already start in hybrid mode when i leave. In this case i just let the car manage if it uses the ICE or the eletrical motor. Still get good mileage (l/100km). I've learned from experience that if you use the battery first and then change to hybrid it will use more fuel. You can also choose the battery charge function and with a full battery it will be gentle on the charging, using a bit more fuel but nothing special (FULL BATTERY means no charging needed). There is also the GTE mode that's nice but uses more fuel then mentioned before. It's a matter of trying it out and come to your own conclusion, i had a hybrid before i bought this car so i knew what i was getting into.

Mine is 2015 Passat, so heavier, i also live in a place where i have about 1km of climbing a hill (in which direction i go) if i leave my house and i've noticed that the range goes down quick. In order to "dampen" a bit i normaly use the hybrid mode to get "up the hill" and then change to electric mode for shorter journeys, if i have to go further i just leave it in hybrid mode.

Last time put petrol in it i had about 4.5L/100KM but i charge it alot for free so this number is not very accurate( if i do 1000 km but drive 750km electric i have used petrol for 250km and it should calculate for that extension only!!). I had a Toyota C-HR before this (hybrid, 1.8L) and it has a range for about 4km if you can master your right foot, doing about 6-7L/100km so in my opinion since i've bought the VW i am only gaining €€.

Since you haven't bought it yet: it's a nice system, it has it's quirks and in my case the only thing i didn't like so far is the (too) soft suspension, a DSG gearbox that in GTE mode gets lost downshifting 2 speeds when it should ony do 1 (example) and some noises in the cabin from the plastics. But mine is a passat, same tech.........

Beco
 

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To get the best economy from hybrid mode on long trips:
  • Fully charged battery
  • Start in electric and ideally use around 5 miles. This ensures you have a "regen buffer" so the car can charge
  • Ideally before you hit the motorway allow the engine to run up for at least a minute, ensuring the coolant is warm and oil is not dead cold.
  • Run on hybrid until about 20 miles from your destination.
  • Switch to electric and arrive with an empty battery.
If you are arriving at a destination with charging, aim to arrive with zero. Otherwise, aim to arrive with more: it is your choice, but at least 2-3 miles is needed for good hybrid performance. You can elect to "split" your EV mode across the journeys, so arriving with 10 miles range then using that 10 miles on the way home. On cold days, it is better to run down on electric for longer as the engine coolant will be useful to heat the cabin for up to 15 minutes, without using any electric power for this.

If you allow the car to run the battery down on electric mode then automatically switch to hybrid, it will waste extra fuel charging the battery up, and you will also lose some of the "GTE" benefits from the hybrid system, such as smooth and high power acceleration (you will be limited to engine only and the car will not coast with engine off as much until the battery is charged.) And if you hit traffic, the car will not do stop-start well.
 

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To get the best economy from hybrid mode on long trips:
  • Fully charged battery
  • Start in electric and ideally use around 5 miles. This ensures you have a "regen buffer" so the car can charge
  • Ideally before you hit the motorway allow the engine to run up for at least a minute, ensuring the coolant is warm and oil is not dead cold.
  • Run on hybrid until about 20 miles from your destination.
  • Switch to electric and arrive with an empty battery.
If you are arriving at a destination with charging, aim to arrive with zero. Otherwise, aim to arrive with more: it is your choice, but at least 2-3 miles is needed for good hybrid performance. You can elect to "split" your EV mode across the journeys, so arriving with 10 miles range then using that 10 miles on the way home. On cold days, it is better to run down on electric for longer as the engine coolant will be useful to heat the cabin for up to 15 minutes, without using any electric power for this.

If you allow the car to run the battery down on electric mode then automatically switch to hybrid, it will waste extra fuel charging the battery up, and you will also lose some of the "GTE" benefits from the hybrid system, such as smooth and high power acceleration (you will be limited to engine only and the car will not coast with engine off as much until the battery is charged.) And if you hit traffic, the car will not do stop-start well.
Given all the above palaver, a modern BEV with a 250 mile range is so much better. Surely PHEVs will very shortly be consigned to a scrapheap of failed solution.
 

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Given all the above palaver, a modern BEV with a 250 mile range is so much better. Surely PHEVs will very shortly be consigned to a scrapheap of failed solution.
I expect the palaver does produce marginal improved efficiency but you don't need to do all that. You can just be lazy like me and leave it all to the car.

In my opinion the only way that the above procedure produces ultimate efficiency is if you judge it so perfectly that the battery runs out just as you arrive at your destination. Otherwise you are losing out on some of your cheap electric miles.

For me the attraction of the PHEV is to remove all possible stress so I'm afraid I won't be faffing myself. Neither will I be buying a BEV until I am convinced that I can do my long journeys without the charging faff that we hear so much about.

PS can't afford a Tesla.
 

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Given all the above palaver, a modern BEV with a 250 mile range is so much better. Surely PHEVs will very shortly be consigned to a scrapheap of failed solution.
Sure. I'd like an EV. But a PHEV was affordable. I still manage ~90% of my driving on pure electric with this car. So arguably a pure EV wouldn't give me that much more benefit, although I'd still prefer one.

For now they're a reasonable bridge technology while EVs still cost a bit too much for the average user. I expect price parity to be reached soon, though. The cost of an ICE, exhaust system and gearbox could easily exceed the cost of a bigger battery.
 

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Actually with this car the most fuel efficient (use a little fuel between A-B) way of using it is to run it on EV mode until the car kicks hybrid mode in, this is at the point there is still 20% charge left.

The car will then still use some of that charge to continue on your journey in Hybrid mode.
As mentioned that if you then put the car in GTE mode it will recharge the battery somewhat to gain some performance back.

If you aim to finish your journey with just 1 or even 0 miles on the EV range your missing out on using under the 20% mark.
 
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