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I really do worry about some people’s ability to walk and chew gum at the same time.

Apparently pressing one button on a touch screen will guarantee you crash the car...which is worrying since all new cars now have touchscreens of some sort.
 

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Whoop, none story is a none story.

"After being handed a one-month ban and a €200 (£180) fine." he learned a lesson, just let the wipers do their thing, it auto senses the speed it needs to wipe at, and can be accessed by the wiper stalk control. Ignorance of how your 2 tonne death machine works is not an excuse, and neither is flouting the law.
 

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I don't like the idea of touch screens or smart phones stuck on windscreens in any car and steer clear of using mine other than when stationary. If the controls of a Tesla can be operated by stalks or voice then that's fine and dandy. My issue with the car is that there appears to be a bloody great interactive screen nailed to the dashboard which surely infers that it is meant to be a key interface for the driver. To probably misquote the great Brian Clough, if he isn't interfering with play, what is he doing on the pitch?

I liked the cars and their concept when I went to see them but I just couldn't figure out what that thing was for if I wasn't going to use it whilst driving. It was one of the things that put me off rather than attracting me but maybe I'm getting all old and luddite again.

That said, if you crash a car, it's your fault, not the car's! The Germans do seem to be going after Tesla at present. Wonder why?
 

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I don't like the idea of touch screens or smart phones stuck on windscreens in any car and steer clear of using mine other than when stationary. If the controls of a Tesla can be operated by stalks or voice then that's fine and dandy. My issue with the car is that there appears to be a bloody great interactive screen nailed to the dashboard which surely infers that it is meant to be a key interface for the driver. To probably misquote the great Brian Clough, if he isn't interfering with play, what is he doing on the pitch?

I liked the cars and their concept when I went to see them but I just couldn't figure out what that thing was for if I wasn't going to use it whilst driving. It was one of the things that put me off rather than attracting me but maybe I'm getting all old and luddite again.

That said, if you crash a car, it's your fault, not the car's! The Germans do seem to be going after Tesla at present. Wonder why?
There's no real reason to touch it while driving. I don't. It's great for displaying info like maps and for all the goodies whilst stationary.
 

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And yet the overall safety of Teslas compared with the wider fleet of cars continues to go up:

 

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And yet the overall safety of Teslas compared with the wider fleet of cars continues to go up:

Taking the accident data on roads where ‘autopilot’ when in use will have the easiest time possible and is arguably designed to work, and comparing it to accident data from all cars on all roads is misleading.

It’s not as striking as your post states.

Electrek from your own link say as much themselves. You’d need to compare data from the roads where Tesla’s autopilot is engaged with data from non autopilot cars on the same roads over the same time period for it to be meaningful. All cars seem to benefit from the active safety features being fitted though.

On the OP, whatever the interface of the car in question or indeed and claims or benefits of an assist system, the nut behind the wheel is 100% responsible for operating it safely.
 

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Taking the accident data on roads where ‘autopilot’ when in use will have the easiest time possible and is arguably designed to work, and comparing it to accident data from all cars on all roads is misleading.

It’s not as striking as your post states.

Electrek from your own link say as much themselves. You’d need to compare data from the roads where Tesla’s autopilot is engaged with data from non autopilot cars on the same roads over the same time period for it to be meaningful. All cars seem to benefit from the active safety features being fitted though.

On the OP, whatever the interface of the car in question or indeed and claims or benefits of an assist system, the nut behind the wheel is 100% responsible for operating it safely.
But even the non-autopilot Tesla accident rates are 3 times better than overall accident rates.
 

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While the devil is in the detail, the original claim that the Tesla UI is dangerous is clearly not brought out by any data.
 

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But even the non-autopilot Tesla accident rates are 3 times better than overall accident rates.
In fairness, I never said that Tesla’s were less safe than the average American vehicle on the roads!

I’d expect any new/modern car with active safety features to generally be involved in fewer accidents.

There’s a reason that insurers charge lower premiums for cars fitted with autonomous accident avoidance systems, of which the Tesla’s are very good.
 

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While the devil is in the detail, the original claim that the Tesla UI is dangerous is clearly not brought out by any data.
I agree, the most dangerous thing about any vehicle UI is the idiot operating it.
 

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In fairness, I never said that Tesla’s were less safe than the average American vehicle on the roads!

I’d expect any new/modern car with active safety features to generally be involved in fewer accidents.

There’s a reason that insurers charge lower premiums for cars fitted with autonomous accident avoidance systems, of which the Tesla’s are very good.
But risk increased by much higher performance than average. Despite that their accident rate is 3x lower than average.
 

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But risk increased by much higher performance than average. Despite that their accident rate is 3x lower than average.
Without seeing all the data, I’d say it’s impossible to say.

What it would suggest to me is that the risk associated with higher than average performance is less than that of driving a vehicle without any active safety features.

That could of course be influenced by the average demographic of a Tesla driver versus the general driver demographic.

It’s interesting, but the irritating thing is the ‘headlining‘ of trends that appear in the data, only the positive ones of which are attributed to autopilot.

I mean, where’s the headline ‘Autopilot sometimes causes accidents in cars that have it fitted’...?
 

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Thatś completely irrelevant. I have never heard of someone crash because they operated the wiper stalk on the steering wheel, but this looks like a clear case where the (failed) ergonomics of the car induced a user error that lead to a crash.

To be honest, I would love to have a Model 3, but A: I can't afford it (have my eyes set on the e-Niro) and B: I am sure my wife would never be able to operate it correctly because she can't even pinch and zoom and her phone.

The One Screen to Rule Them All approach is fine for a lot of people, but it is undoubtedly more distractful than physical stalks and knobs. In extreme situations, I would also be wary of fiddling with a screen rather than using muscle memory to operate a physical device.
I think you need to drive a model 3. My wife is a complete technophobe and I too worried about the controls. The car has auto wipers, auto lights and a host of other auto things. My wife loves driving it and has hardly ever need to touch the screen whilst driving. When you press the button on the end of the stalk to get a single wipe or a wipe/wash then then controls for the wiper pop up on the screen in case you want to turn the wipers to another setting. If however they are set to auto they learn at what level you want them to operate. Neither of us has had the necessity to change settings whilst driving. Get a test drive and see for yourself.
 

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Without seeing all the data, I’d say it’s impossible to say.
...
It’s interesting, but the irritating thing is the ‘headlining‘ of trends that appear in the data, only the positive ones of which are attributed to autopilot.

I mean, where’s the headline ‘Autopilot sometimes causes accidents in cars that have it fitted’...?
Plenty of "unintended acceleration" stories with Teslas. Again presumably either wrong pedal or caught out by active cruise control / AP features that the driver didn't understand.
 

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Admittedly I haven't looked at Q2 stats for Tesla but their results actually got worse in Q1
Passive AP
  • Q2-19 : 2.19M miles between accidents.
  • Q3-19 : 2.7M miles between accidents.
  • Q4-19 : 2.1M miles between accidents.
  • Q1-20 : 1.99M miles between accidents
And no AP
  • Q2-19 : 1.41M miles between accidents.
  • Q3-19 : 1.82M miles between accidents.
  • Q4-19 : 1.64M miles between accidents.
  • Q1-20 : 1.42M miles between accidents.
In fact comparing Q3-19 cars without even passive AP and the last quarter I looked at, Q1 20, cars with passive safety, the number is relatively close

The quarter on quarter active AP needs to be trended because Q1 2020 was worse than Q3 2019 despite all the "enhancements" and despite all the other data points not showing seasonaility (ie quarters can be compared)

I wrote an article on this and pointed out a number of things including the demographic of the driver and I have a hunch that with the arrival of the Model 3 the risk profile of the average Tesla driver has deteriated with more 20 somethings who think a 0-60 in 3 second car is cool. When I was mid 20s I though a hot hatch doing it in 7s was cool and that was bad enough.
 

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I think you need to drive a model 3. My wife is a complete technophobe and I too worried about the controls. The car has auto wipers, auto lights and a host of other auto things. My wife loves driving it and has hardly ever need to touch the screen whilst driving. When you press the button on the end of the stalk to get a single wipe or a wipe/wash then then controls for the wiper pop up on the screen in case you want to turn the wipers to another setting. If however they are set to auto they learn at what level you want them to operate. Neither of us has had the necessity to change settings whilst driving. Get a test drive and see for yourself.
Yeah, that just leaves the minor issue called money. I need to stretch to afford the e-Niro so I'm afraid the Model 3 is a bit beyond my budget.
 
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