Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Planning to take my PHEV to Swiss alps via France, and I’ve seen most chargers require a Type 3 cable which I don’t have. A new T1-T3 cable costs around £250 which is uneconomic just for holiday use. I already have a Chargemap RFID.
Questions:
Is there such a thing as a cable adapter to allow my existing T2 cable to plug into a T3 charger ?
Approx How much would such a thing cost (or cost to make)?
Would this provide any faster charging than using my granny charger with a UK / EU mains adaptor?
Or do I plan my journey and destination around the (far fewer) locations of tethered Type 4 fast chargers?
Or simply rely on the ICE @ 25 mpg fast cruise + recharge fuel consumption & EV range penalty at slower speeds?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
We will be touring similar parts of France in the summer and I've only got as far as figuring out that I'll make up a short extension with a continental plug for overnight granny charge at the campsite/holiday cottage if we can park near to a socket. Not planning to charge en route, but one reason it could be desirable might be that in mountainous terrain a good SOC is helpful - the car reputedly revs rather high when driving up steep hills without battery to assist. I haven't had a chance to check that, but as we won't be towing I don't think it will be a problem for us.

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What would be the point in charging, other than destination charging wherever you are staying?
The Outlander is series parallel PHEV.... but the parallel bit won’t work if the battery is flat! .... I was indeed thinking about getting up mountain passes with a full load of passengers and ski ware on board, not to mention improving the mpg a bit by charging during our longer rest stops en route.
 

·
Registered
Renault Zoe 50
Joined
·
23,604 Posts
The Outlander is series parallel PHEV.... but the parallel bit won’t work if the battery is flat! .... I was indeed thinking about getting up mountain passes with a full load of passengers and ski ware on board, not to mention improving the mpg a bit by charging during our longer rest stops en route.
The battery is only good for 20 odd miles, so it’s clearly designed to work without the electric motor.

Or do you really see yourself charging this thing every time you go up a mountain?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
I think it is going to get up the hills. It might have to resort to series mode (and high revs) at times when you might prefer it to be in parallel, to maintain both forward progress and SOC. The only people I've heard of really struggling are those towing a heavy load long distances in hilly terrain. Try asking on myoutlanderphev.com, too.

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,228 Posts
I'm pretty sure in previous discussions on here others have either offered to rent or have hired Type 3 cable for French trips. It would be worth searching the forum.

If you're using 2 pin schuko converter, be aware that there is not a consistent live & neutral position in France and some have talked about making their converters so L & N can be swapped over if they fail to charge.

Finally, if you're planning to go Brittany Ferries, pm me. We have a property in France and I can give you a code which will discount your crossing.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
If you're using 2 pin schuko converter, be aware that there is not a consistent live & neutral position in France and some have talked about making their converters so L & N can be swapped over if they fail to charge.
Good point. I carry a plug-in mains tester for French campsites and can just rewire the extension socket the other way round if needed.

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Good point. I carry a plug-in mains tester for French campsites and can just rewire the extension socket the other way round if needed.
Good advice in general. Thank you for that. Yet presumably this is not necessary for connecting a granny charger to French 220v AC, as any live / neutral reversal will have no effect on the functioning of the rectifier producing DC for the battery... or am I missing something else in the safety/control electronics associated with EV chargers?
 

·
Registered
Renault Zoe 50
Joined
·
23,604 Posts
Good advice in general. Thank you for that. Yet presumably this is not necessary for connecting a granny charger to French 220v AC, as any live / neutral reversal will have no effect on the functioning of the rectifier producing DC for the battery... or am I missing something else in the safety/control electronics associated with EV chargers?
The chargers are fussy about the polarity, hence you need something which will reverse it.

I use a schuko extension lead that’s rated at 3 kW and can be plugged in to reverse the polarity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Or do you really see yourself charging this thing every time you go up a mountain?
From what I have read, I should avoid leaving the car parked and “fully” discharged in sub zero temperatures for a week (ok I also learn that the Outlander never (?) fully discharges itself but... )

So my idea was to fully recharge before tackling the last mountains to my destination, and to save enough charge to reach my destination with a few miles of charge remaining.
Or am I over complicating things?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
When there are no battery bars showing, the battery is actually at about 30% (real). I would try not to leave it showing 'empty' for too long at very low temps, but I'd be very surprised if you'd do any damage in a week....
The 'charge' button is for situations like this - mountain driving or towing. I would just press 'charge' well before tackling the last mountain section and not worry too much about charging en route...that's what the car is designed to do......but your mpg will be rather poor I'm afraid....
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top