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Kona PremSe64k 2020+bluelink +ohme
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I was wondering about trying to guage how many people structurally keep their battery in the mid-range (say 20 to 80%) for say 90% of their car's use, and how many do not. This thought was triggered by seeing yet another video answering the question "how long does it take to charge a kona from 0 to 80%". This is a situation I, personally never expect or hope to get into. This test ended up with the car going into turtle mode just as the driver was pulling off the motorway. Talk about an self induced and unnecessary danger! But any danger is another subject...

Yes, I might end up with 0% on an odd occasion, but I certainly don't intend to make it a daily event. My general strategy is to keep the battery within 20-80% range except when necessary. During lockdown I have been reducing that to between 50-80%.

The only time I will go outside the 20-80% window on the top end is charging to 100% in preparation for a long journey at home. When en-route charging max will be sufficient to get to the next likely charging point, with say 5-10% spare. At the low end I will only go below to reach a charging point or destination.

My reasons are that, afiak, 20-80% is the sweet spot both in terms of battery longevity but also charging speed.

Does that make sense? If so why do people upload videos going down to 0% and, imo, doing something silly in terms of safety and battery sense.

Sorry if, in writing this post, I sound like I am preaching to the converted. But if your opinion about the sweet spot differs I would love to hear reasons, which I guess could be ignorance or better knowledge, personal preferences, car model etc.
 

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I tend to keep mine 80% or below most of the time, charging to 100% about once every 1000 miles or when I am on a long trip. My old Zoe 22 had a range of around 80 miles on average, strangely I start thinking its time to top up if my range falls to a figure above this. How times have changed with the Kona 64, hitting around 330 miles to a full charge in the summer (Average steady driving, nothing heavy footed). I also only rapid charge when I need to, such as a very long journey. Most of my charging is done at home, via the Zappi/solar or 7kw charging when the sun is being elusive or over winter. Octopus Agile then comes into play.
 

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This has been discussed goodness knows how much on here, but guess it’s time again to recycle some views and trot out some old wives tales based on theories and early Leaf ownership. :ROFLMAO:

Battery management systems have come on a long way, and most modern battery packs have a top and bottom buffer of varying size. I think it’s only Tesla’s that can access 100% of their battery packs which is why many owners ‘self buffer‘.

The problem for me is, there is just no clear evidence for whether babying your battery makes any difference whatsoever to degradation over the life of the car. For everybody who posts that their car is x years old and has only lost xx% of battery capacity and is testament to their careful use, there will be somebody else who says I just use it however I want and leave it fully charged and it’s fine too. That’s before you consider how you measure such things accurately using a third party App and lots of assumptions.

Myself, I always charge to an indicated 100% unless it’s going to be a very short trip. I concede that I leave it charged sitting at about 60% most of the time, sufficient for an emergency trip but mainly so that my battery will be nicely warmed for the journey by charging the last 40% prior to the journey.

My car only has a 32 kWh useable pack, and I really can’t afford to turn it into an effective 19.2 kWh pack by restricting myself to using only 60% of it, for the benefit of I’m not sure what. Maybe a second owner would benefit, maybe not, I don’t care frankly and I won’t be keeping the car for 10 years or more.

I’ll let the manufacturer worry about the battery pack, I’ve got more important things to worry about, especially in the current climate if I’m honest.
 

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This has been discussed goodness knows how much on here, but guess it’s time again to recycle some views and trot out some old wives tales based on theories and early Leaf ownership. :ROFLMAO:

Battery management systems have come on a long way, and most modern battery packs have a top and bottom buffer of varying size. I think it’s only Tesla’s that can access 100% of their battery packs which is why many owners ‘self buffer‘.

The problem for me is, there is just no clear evidence for whether babying your battery makes any difference whatsoever to degradation over the life of the car. For everybody who posts that their car is x years old and has only lost xx% of battery capacity and is testament to their careful use, there will be somebody else who says I just use it however I want and leave it fully charged and it’s fine too. That’s before you consider how you measure such things accurately using a third party App and lots of assumptions.

Myself, I always charge to an indicated 100% unless it’s going to be a very short trip. I concede that I leave it charged sitting at about 60% most of the time, sufficient for an emergency trip but mainly so that my battery will be nicely warmed for the journey by charging the last 40% prior to the journey.

My car only has a 32 kWh useable pack, and I really can’t afford to turn it into an effective 19.2 kWh pack by restricting myself to using only 60% of it, for the benefit of I’m not sure what. Maybe a second owner would benefit, maybe not, I don’t care frankly and I won’t be keeping the car for 10 years or more.

I’ll let the manufacturer worry about the battery pack, I’ve got more important things to worry about, especially in the current climate if I’m honest.
Its all relative to the user. I don't need to charge to 100% all the time due to battery size, so solar top ups are the way to go for me. If I had a small battery, yes I would do the 100%, otherwise the car range is limited. Thats why I like the large battery size, not that I need to use it fully all the time but it gives flexibility. I also think that if you own the car (I do) then if you want to keep it for any length of years you are going to look after it more. If it was leased...............oh hell yeah I would rapid charge the hell out of it :)
 

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I am just working like i always with all my cars. Quarter to full and repeat. Been working ok for me.

My Zoe gets a mix of 7kw and 22kw AC charging. I try to vary it up a little to be respectful to the battery. When im using the 22kw post its rarely connected long enough to get to 100% so the balancing tends to happen at home on my driveway when connected to the 7kw.
 

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MG EZS 2020
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I’ll let the manufacturer worry about the battery pack, I’ve got more important things to worry about, especially in the current climate if I’m honest.
That get's my vote. You pay tens of thousands for a car that the manufacturer spend millions in research to produce and then do it yourself! o_O o_O :eek: :eek:
 

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I don’t use my i3 much, in fact, in the last six months I have used £23 of electricity - lockdown and cheap Octopus Go rate. So I charge at about 75% and leave it overnight on a cheap rate and there is no simple way to stop the charge before 100%. Since that is 90% of actual capacity and not on rapid charge I have absolutely no concern about adverse impact on battery life. Surely it’s more important to have the car ready to go at all times with the best available range. It’s not as though you are carrying extra weight with a full charge!
 

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Renault ZOE R135 ZE50 GTLine July 2020 (Sold: R90 ZE40 i Dynamic Nav June 2017)
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I think Einstein says you are carrying around an extra 2 microgram for 50kWh.
 

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The Ampera/Volt only allows the use of 10kWh of it's 16kWh battery. When the car says it's empty it's actually still at 20%, and when it say it's full it's only at 80%. So the buffer suggested above is built-in. This is why they can travel mega miles and show zero degradation.

Of course, it has a backup petrol engine, so the battery range is less important, but it does illustrate the point. If anything, the car is overprotective.
 

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Isn't it what Renault are now doing with the latest ZOE? Both the ZE40 and ZE50 have the same battery pack, but it is more limited in the '40. That should give some interesting data on degradation at different capacities...
 
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