Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New member, currently researching my next purchase.

Up until now I've had a fun car and a commuter. I've sold the fun car and want something interesting to replace my soul destroying (albeit highly competent) Golf commuter.

I'm tempted by the Golf GTE, perhaps not as economical as my diesel for my use pattern but far more interesting and potentially fun.

I have a 160 mile commute but only do it one direction in any given day, 30k+ miles annually.

Difficult to get a handle on this car for my purposes, test drives not really giving an accurate reflection. Lots of Internet testimony includes preachers that don't really understand how hybrids work and proclaim "once the battery has gone, it's just a 1.4 dragging extra weight around"....which clearly isn't the case unless you let it happen.

Interested and grateful for any advice, particularly costs regarding fuel, maintenance and servicing.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,136 Posts
Presumably the 160 mile commute is mostly motorway and dual carriageway? Are you able to charge at both ends of the commute?
Outside of the commute what other journey lengths do you do?
Have you considered a full EV? Several former GTE owners on here now have ID3s and can give a direct comparison.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Chris. Yes can charge at both ends, though I believe work charge on a time basis so the slow charging of the GTE might make it not economically viable. So it might just be charging at home.

Other than the commute which is almost all motorway, the usage is usual family life. In this aspect the hybrid is a clear win.

I am considering full EV, posted a similar thread in the Kona forum.
 

·
Registered
Nissan LEAF30
Joined
·
6,911 Posts
"once the battery has gone, it's just a 1.4 dragging extra weight around"....which clearly isn't the case unless you let it happen.
How do you prevent that being the case?
You'll get at most 30 electric miles which you can choose when to use in the 160 miles journey, but apart from a very small amount gained through regeneration in stop-start traffic it will behave as a 1.4 TSi.
If you are running it as a company car then you have a major tax advantage, and for shorter weekend usage it is more fun, but it's advantages are much less as a long distance commuter. You also have to set against it the higher ownership costs.
A long-range BEV like an ID.3 or Kona makes more financial sense particularly if you can fully charge at both ends of your journey. But they may not meet your fun requirements for the weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
In the same way I imagine non plug in hybrids manage it? On the test drives I've had I noted that the battery charge would go down but also used overrun and the natural terrain variation to recover some charge so I saw the range increase. The engine was cutting out, cutting in, charging, etc. Basically all states. However the longest drive was 45 minutes or so, so I guess it may eventually run out and the empty state kicks in? This is what I haven't been able to investigate. Really though, the manner of consumption is irrelevant, I just really need to know if I can achieve a reliable 50+mpg over the distance.

Not being run as a company car, financially I'd be spending around 20k on a GTE and around 30k on an EV. Monthly cost therefore roughly the same when accounting for my borrowing. The ID3s I've seen close to my budget have looked a bit spartan inside. The Konas the opposite hence my leaning towards them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,136 Posts
Thanks Chris. Yes can charge at both ends, though I believe work charge on a time basis so the slow charging of the GTE might make it not economically viable. So it might just be charging at home.

Other than the commute which is almost all motorway, the usage is usual family life. In this aspect the hybrid is a clear win.

I am considering full EV, posted a similar thread in the Kona forum.
On a 160 mile run with my GTE I would expect to get around 50 mpg, more if I was taking it easy.

30k miles per year means at least 2 services a year at VW prices. I would also recommend extending the warranty.

The Hyundai and Kia EVs are good cars, but depending on your definition of fun are not going to be as fun to drive as a GTE (in my opinion obviously). The ID3 might be closer, but probably still falls short.

The Seat version of the ID3 (the el born) has been given a Cupra badge and is being marketed accordingly, though not yet available to buy. Equally there is a sportier version of the ID3 bring hinted at.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The servicing and warranty are good points. I think I'd buy from a VW dealer so two year warranty included but 10k service intervals (?) will annoy.

Regarding being a fun drive, it doesn't need to be fun in the traditional sense just interesting. I think both are interesting enough.
 

·
Registered
Nissan LEAF30
Joined
·
6,911 Posts
The servicing and warranty are good points. I think I'd buy from a VW dealer so two year warranty included but 10k service intervals (?) will annoy.

Regarding being a fun drive, it doesn't need to be fun in the traditional sense just interesting. I think both are interesting enough.
Don't forget the DSG oil changes (possibly twice) and the cambelt servicing, both of which you'll see in your ownership.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ringi

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,724 Posts
If the Hyundai warranty covers all parts other then brakes etc for 5 years, I would be tempted to get a Hyundai EV for that usage and keep it for at least 5 years. Even a Tesla Model 3 when kept for long enough would give a good pcm cost, there are some ex demos Model 3 being sold by Tesla at present.

Check if extending your mortgage gives a better interest rate then a car loan.
 

·
Registered
VW Passat GTE
Joined
·
676 Posts
I have a 160 mile commute
the commute which is almost all motorway
If the Golf is similar to the Passat GTE, hybrid drive won't do much on a motorway. There may be a few occasions where the engine will switch off, but it'll mostly use the engine. The hybrid really shines for start/stop.

Let's say that you're running 45mpg at motorway speeds using just the engine. Let's also say that you get 25 miles as an EV. So you're doing 135 miles at 45mpg, and 25 miles "free" as an EV. That's 3 gallons of fuel over 160 miles, so your effective mpg over the journey is 53mpg. If 3 gallons of fuel costs £16.36 (£5.45 per gallon, fairly randomly chosen number) and your full battery charge costs £0.50 (which is roughly what a full charge in my Passat GTE costs), your total journey cost is £16.36. That gives you a fuel cost per mile of 10p. That isn't dissimilar to what you'd get from a diesel, so fuel cost wise, it may be OK as long as you're charging at each end (and as long as my randomly chosen numbers are sensible, pick your own and run your own maths to confirm it).

The 9k mile service interval will be the real killer for you, as you'll be having 3 services per year: GTE Service | Volkswagen UK
If you actually do 30k per year, year 4 will be really fun, where you end up with 2 major (90k and 108k) and 2 minor services (99k and 117k) in one year. Based on that alone, I'd consider something with a higher service interval...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the effort you've put into that post, much appreciated.

I have run the costs for my scenarios, the GTE not being the most effective but still substantially cheaper than my previous setup of commuter and fun car. So the thing is, it's a question only I can answer. Only I can assess the value I put on each aspect of ownership. If it was just about cost I'd obviously just continue to run my Golf.

However, as you point out I think one would have to REALLY want the GTE to put up with those costs.
 

·
2quidforhalfanhour
Joined
·
348 Posts
Surely some of these costs could be lessened by using VW independents? I know where I would rather take my car out of warranty.
I have thought about a gte as I have a commute with destination charging that would easily be covered electric only, (as well as a home charger), what worries me is the ICE would therefore be used very infrequently which brings its own problems.
However having a car that does my commute on electric and also one that will take me further a field without range anxiety appeals greatly.
(Perhaps this scenario is the opposite to the point of the thread so apologies).
Still mulling over the equation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
For anyone considering a Golf GTE, I am selling my very nice example here:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
Difficult to get a handle on this car for my purposes, test drives not really giving an accurate reflection. Lots of Internet testimony includes preachers that don't really understand how hybrids work and proclaim "once the battery has gone, it's just a 1.4 dragging extra weight around"....which clearly isn't the case unless you let it happen.
True, but how would you prevent that from happening on a 160 mile commute?

Its one of those cases that if you want one for the way it performs go for it, but it will be hard to justify on mileage grounds (unless perhaps plan B was a GTI rather than a long range EV)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
My point is that (I believe) in hybrid mode the car doesn't just use up its battery until it's dead and then drive only on petrol. So I won't have to prevent it, the car will. Similarly if you drive in hybrid mode with the battery on 0, you'll get awful MPG at first until it has a couple of miles electric range because it's charging itself.

Of course, if I was just buying for MPG then I'd just stick with my diesel Golf. The fact that I have sold my S5 Convertible "fun" car means that I have some latitude in my "man maths" mental budget to accept lower economy for a more interesting car.

The main thing against the GTE is servicing and general upkeep (warranty etc). The full EV route is interesting and financially sound, albeit with a bigger initial outlay because only newer EVs have the required range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,136 Posts
Surely some of these costs could be lessened by using VW independents? I know where I would rather take my car out of warranty.
I have thought about a gte as I have a commute with destination charging that would easily be covered electric only, (as well as a home charger), what worries me is the ICE would therefore be used very infrequently which brings its own problems.
However having a car that does my commute on electric and also one that will take me further a field without range anxiety appeals greatly.
(Perhaps this scenario is the opposite to the point of the thread so apologies).
Still mulling over the equation.
Any PHEV without warranty is a risk, due to the inherent complexity. I think most / all GTE owners on here will agree it is a really great car that needs a warranty, not because it is fragile / unreliable but because it is complicated.

Most of my journeys are electric only, with the ICE only getting used once every few months at most.

The car does a bunch of clever stuff in the background to keep the ICE happy and healthy - for example every now and again it will turn over the ICE without starting it, to keep everything lubricated. The only indication is it flashes up in the driver display to tell you it has done so.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top