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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to all this, but am in the process of finally getting a charger installed, and now for the car! This car is fairly close to where I am, and 7,000. Leased battery (between 40-70 p/month depending on mileage). I would LOVE anyone with knowledge about this to give any feedback if this is an okay deal...Hopefully this video showing the car will work...

Dacia Exeter | Dacia Dealerships in Exeter | Bristol Street Motors

MW64YVX Zoe

Apparently on full charge, it goes about 100 miles. Battery is above 90% capacity., and is apparently replaced if it goes below 90%. Full service history. Not clear if it comes with cables.

Thank you if anyone has any tips!!
 

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Apparently on full charge, it goes about 100 miles
Probably more like 60 on average. More if you drive slowly and carefully, but 100 isn't happening. And in winter these numbers will drop even further.

Battery is above 90% capacity., and is apparently replaced if it goes below 90%
If I'm not mistaken it's 70% and they will refurbish the battery by replacing individual faulty cells to get you back over the threshold. You wouldn't be getting a new battery pack. There's no new 22kWh packs anymore.

Not clear if it comes with cables.
With the Zoe, typically you can expect a Type 2 cable, but not a 3-Pin 'granny' cable.

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If you're buying an old Zoe, make sure it has the extended warranty on it, and keep extending this yourself too. They can be very expensive to repair if things go wrong.

It isn't a bad car, but you need to go into this knowing exactly what you're getting. Keep expectations realistic and make sure it's suitable for your needs.

I Personally think if the short range is enough, I would be looking for one of the triplets, or a good 24kWh LEAF with a decent battery still instead. Avoid the battery lease, get a similar range, and the ability to DC Rapid charge too.
 

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Hi Phiaji. Can't see a price for car, I'd expect around £8,500/£9,000 on forecourt at current prices for battery lease model, depending on mileage and condition. Go for minimum lease on battery. Battery lease guarantees 75% state of health. Car won't be under manufacturer's warranty, so check warranty from dealer, I'd want a year, and full cover for EV components. Range around 70 miles in winter, maybe 100 in this weather, so knock off at least 15 miles for practical range. Make sure everything works, and insist on a decent test drive. Great little car, but purchase carefully. I've had my Zoe for almost five years, still love it..
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks so much. I have some more dumb questions, if that is ok!!

What is 'one of the triplets'? I would like a Leaf, but they seem to start at 10,000+ now, even for the old ones that are 100s of miles from me. This Zoe is only 30miles from me, so easy to get..!

I generally drive 20 miles p/day, so distance daily would be fine. Can the Zoe's not rapid charge?

Re extended warranty, do you mean on the battery, or the whole car?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Phiaji. Can't see a price for car, I'd expect around £8,500/£9,000 on forecourt at current prices for battery lease model, depending on mileage and condition. Go for minimum lease on battery. Battery lease guarantees 75% state of health. Car won't be under manufacturer's warranty, so check warranty from dealer, I'd want a year, and full cover for EV components. Range around 70 miles in winter, maybe 100 in this weather, so knock off at least 15 miles for practical range. Make sure everything works, and insist on a decent test drive. Great little car, but purchase carefully. I've had my Zoe for almost five years, still love it..
Thanks so much. It's selling for 7,000. Seems good compared to what other second hand LEAFs etc are going for...
May I ask why a minimum lease on the battery?
 

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Because they never bother to charge you for miles over your allowance.

Also yeah, Zoe 22 ain’t getting 100 miles. Mine was 70 in the depths of winter when driven carefully and 90 at a push in summer.

£7000 seems a sensible price.
 
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Thanks so much. I have some more dumb questions, if that is ok!!

What is 'one of the triplets'? I would like a Leaf, but they seem to start at 10,000+ now, even for the old ones that are 100s of miles from me. This Zoe is only 30miles from me, so easy to get..!

I generally drive 20 miles p/day, so distance daily would be fine. Can the Zoe's not rapid charge?

Re extended warranty, do you mean on the battery, or the whole car?
The triplets = 3 brands released the same car model under different names. Mitsubishi i-MiEV, Peugeot iOn, Citroen C-Zero.

Cheaper LEAFs do sometimes come up. It may be worth waiting for that if it’s what you really want. Remember that it saves you the ongoing expense of a battery lease so it’s something to consider too.

The Zoe can charge at up to 22kW on AC with the Type 2 connector. Maybe 43kW if it’s a ‘Q’ model. There is no DC option on the Zoe. And the problem is that AC rapid charging is now a dead standard. Less and less charging networks support it. So it’s not something you should count on being able to do. The other two models I mentioned have DC CHAdeMO rapid charging which is still a pretty widely used standard available almost everywhere and will charge the battery significantly faster.

If getting a battery lease Zoe it comes with a warranty on the pack for as long as you keep paying. But I was talking about the car itself. Even outside of the battery there’s lots of expensive components that can fail. If you search around on the forums you’ll quickly see why it’s not wise to run an old Zoe without an extended warranty and why this advice is so commonly passed down to any potential new owner of one.

Pretty much anything will be up to the task of your daily commute so thankfully range isn’t too much of a worry at least. I note that the dealer website even mentions a shorter, more realistic range in the description of 60 miles or so, similar to my original comment, which I’m pleased to see. The dealers tend to mislead people and there’s often lots of posts on these forums about people struggling because the range isn’t anywhere near the numbers they were told by the salesperson. It’s always good to know exactly what you’ll get in the real world before parting with money.
 

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It might be a fairy tale, but AFAIK the older LEAFs had fairly serious issues with battery temperature and possible degradation as a result. As said, I can't be sure if it's true, if it was fixed and if so, from what date. Might be worth delving into that should you consider that alternative.

Agree with what is said about the range.

For comparison: my 2013 22 kWh Q210 ZOE with about 85000 mi is still at 83% State of Health, which I consider not bad at all.
 

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It might be a fairy tale, but AFAIK the older LEAFs had fairly serious issues with battery temperature and possible degradation as a result. As said, I can't be sure if it's true, if it was fixed and if so, from what date. Might be worth delving into that should you consider that alternative.

Agree with what is said about the range.

For comparison: my 2013 22 kWh Q210 ZOE with about 85000 mi is still at 83% State of Health, which I consider not bad at all.
Anything built in Japan has the older battery chemistry. They were more prone to degradation. The UK built ones had a newer battery which was a little tougher against the wear. As you say though, all LEAFs even today lack the thermal management. It’s more about how the previous owners looked after them. You can get an original 24kWh model with 11 or even all 12 bars of health still, but likewise you can get the latest model only a couple of years old with severe wear or even damage to the pack.

Looking at the health bars on the dash gives a good initial idea of how it’s been treated. But with LeafSpy you can take a detailed look at its history and really see how good the battery is. As for UK/Japan models. It was only the first year or so of sales which were Japanese. They can be identified with a light interior and electronically operated parking brake. The UK models have a darker interior and foot operated parking brake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks so much everyone. Just found out some more info - WHY don't dealers post this info so you don't have to go digging??
  • 47, 700 miles on it
  • 2014 Intens model
  • just had steering column re-done

Would a car like this retain its resale value? Or will it be far too old for anyone else to want after a few years? Leafs seem to just be going UP in value!
 

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Prices are high on all EVs, can't see things changing anytime soon. I paid £8,500 for my '66 plate Zoe (22kW) five years ago. Worth asking if car has had 12v battery replaced recently, recommend every three years, obviously other service history important.
 

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Depends where you got it from. My Zoe 22 was £10k from a Renault main dealer 5 years ago, but it had just 2000 miles on it.
 
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Ex Demo at Platinum Renault, just over 3k miles. The new model had just come out (40kW). They were asking £9,500, it had been on the forecourt for a while, so I made an offer. Was surprised they accepted £8,500. It's been faultless. Have been thinking of an upgrade recently. Big money to make it worthwhile though.
 
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