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I like "to see if it can store power locally"

You would hope they might know that prior to building it.

Perhaps adding "effectively" to the sentence?
 

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I'm dumbstruck... Just where to start on the technical inaccuracies, zero evidence, and blatant spin is a minefield.

Reduction of distribution costs, how? (Reduction of generation cost I could believe)

Your "electricity company" some how hives off power just for your house, really?

Putting it into perspective. It's 6mWh so 70 Tesla Model S's. This thing cost £20m! You could buy the same storage capacity in Teslas for a quarter of that ;)

Then we have the question about "biggest of it's kind". It is but only because it's using Li-Ion. I'm not convinced it's far superior to Pb battery in a stationary application, especially given the long term track record of recycling a Pb battery enjoys.

Anyway, I'm off for a cup of tea.
 

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Reduction of distribution costs, how? (Reduction of generation cost I could believe)
The distribution network (including transformers etc) are all sized for maximum demand. Reduce maximum demand by storing it locally, then the size of the network (and the losses in it) are smaller too.
Simon Mac said:
Your "electricity company" some how hives off power just for your house, really?
They don't of course - since your (and everyone elses) demand is what pulls the energy through the wires. But by supplying that demand from a local battery rather than across the grid at peak times, and then recharging the battery at off peak times cuts off times.

At a domestic level, the cost of your energy is charged to your Supplier at a standard demand curve. At a SME and above level (100Kw) energy is priced in half hours based on half hourly meter reads. Distribution companies have to pick up the losses at the half hourly pricing. I suspect (but don't quite know how this actually works commercially) that they are shifting their losses to the cheap energy period by moving it.

[From 1972 - 2009 I was in an IT Company that did much of the computing for the UK market - my role from about 1994 was initially to specify the metering system for the company that had the franchise for collecting all 1/2 hourly meter reads prior to it becoming a competitive service in 1998 and then latterly to understand how the market worked at the domestic level, so we could win the business to run the central settlement system from 1998 onwards. My knowledge is from back then so a little rusty. My latter days at the company were supporting the rest of our businesses around the world replicating our UK success]
 

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The distribution network (including transformers etc) are all sized for maximum demand. Reduce maximum demand by storing it locally, then the size of the network (and the losses in it) are smaller too.


For sure, but my understanding was the backbone network has enough capacity, but local distribution and generation smoothing are the real problems faced.

 

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For sure, but my understanding was the backbone network has enough capacity, but local distribution and generation smoothing are the real problems faced.
As I said above I am a little rusty - so not up to date, but National Grid manage capacity by having contracts with generators that enable them to get them to increase generation at one place and decrease at another in order to try and avoid certain segments getting too warm. Most generation is connected at this level and there is a centrally run commercial market where generation can bid to vary their contracted demand on a close to real time basis. National Grid try to optimise on cost (subject to the physical constraints) using this market.

But at a regional level, where the distribution companies take over, there is still quite a bit of network needed bring the power from the backbone to the local areas. The distribution companies don't have the mechanisms in place to get generators to vary their production, so I think this battery storage is a similar mechanism for them.

Also - as you allude to - personal level generation is on the increase, where it is connected at distribution level. One of the last consultancy studies I did before I went back to being a junior programmer (my current role :)) was for a Dutch utility who were thinking about the "Smart Grid". This was about providing control at the local substation level (area of a few streets) for managing this strange new world. Electric Cars and their batteries was certainly on the radar then as one of the mechanisms for doing this.
 

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@akc42 :) your rustyness, is probably still better than my 3rd hand knowledge ! :cool:

My grandfather worked for the Electricity Board cutting deals with farmers to put pylons in and my father did his apprenticeship HV cable jointing, before moving up through the ranks to design substations, finally going into industrial installations. My dad is now semi-retired, but we often discuss this sort of stuff... He loves the Tesla BTW, and I took him to the launch event. :D
 

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Dinorwig seems a great solution to short term peak demands but I can't help thinking it's a big, expensive, concrete heavy solution to a problem that local storage could help to fix. Yes, there is the question over accelerated degradation if EV's are to be part of the solution, but the cost savings in not having to create other huge infrastructure projects could easily be diverted into a favourable (for the EV owner) payment to cover the electricity donated and any battery costs incurred over the longer period. Also the charge / discharge cycles would be smaller so would have less of a degradation effect on Li Ion batteries.
 

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Somewhere in the balance comes Wind Power which although quite cheap on windy days has that irritating property of providing nothing on others. Coupling large scale storage to wind generation could make wind power more attractive, and useful.
As for the quoted price, it is at pre-production stage, the point where every penny is added on by the accountants including the wages of the cleaners!. The real price only appears when the commercial package is marketed.
 

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Somewhere in the balance comes Wind Power which although quite cheap on windy days has that irritating property of providing nothing on others. Coupling large scale storage to wind generation could make wind power more attractive, and useful.
As for the quoted price, it is at pre-production stage, the point where every penny is added on by the accountants including the wages of the cleaners!. The real price only appears when the commercial package is marketed.
Completely agree, pretty much all the "renewables" have this issue, so until we have solved storage we will continue to require almost as many power plants, just now they operate at suboptimal efficiency.

Pre-production, and it's grant funded, so no doubt their will be some profiteering :(
 

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Many years ago I was loaned a pair of pre-production Transceivers by a company. They had cost £18k each. They were aimed at the MOD market and were soldier proof. The proposed civilian version was to sell at around £150. I guess the same will apply to bulk energy storage.
 
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