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Worth noting that Instavolt (through Chargepoint), Ionity, and Shell are all part of the New Motion agreement. So you can get one App/RFID that does them all. Worked nicely on Ionity this weekend.
Whilst I'm not a fan of charging membership schemes, being able to avoid a slew of apps (e.g. Shell and Ionity to start with) with one is a step slightly better direction.

Edit: Oh, and Fastned
That's interesting - I have a newmotion chip for use in The Netherlands, good to know
 

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Worth noting that Instavolt (through Chargepoint), Ionity, and Shell are all part of the New Motion agreement. So you can get one App/RFID that does them all. Worked nicely on Ionity this weekend.
Whilst I'm not a fan of charging membership schemes, being able to avoid a slew of apps (e.g. Shell and Ionity to start with) with one is a step slightly better direction.
Good point - and roaming agreements between providers is the way to go, just be careful though that not all agreements are equal, for example, NewMotion vs PlugSurfing using Ionity has different prices.

 

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We will know sence has arrived when a Tesla driver (using CCS) can charge on a Instavolt charger with the cost being included in their next Tesla bill, along with Instavolt chargers showing up on the Tesla nevigation system including real-time updates of the number of free stalls.

(The CCS stardard is designed so it can do things like this, without stopping other cars/chargers from working with each other.)
 

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I know the charging networks have a huge capital cost and currently low occupancy. But it will be very difficult to convince people to switch to EVs, especially if they don't have reliable work-or-home charging solutions, that they satisfy the value-for-money side of the equation.
I woudlnt try to persuade anyone who cannot charge at home or work into an EV at present.
But that doesnt currently matter. Something like 70% of car owners have a drive at home, and presumably a very high % of those could charge. Given waiting lists ranging up to a year out it wouldnot be possible to satisfy anywhere near demand if all of a sudden everyone decided EVs were for them.
So there's plenty of low hanging fruit amongst those who can charge at home or work, once a high enough proportion of cars are EVs that will pull through on the numbers to enable rates to be lowered (and more facilities to be in place) to cater for those who dont have reliable work-or-home charging solutions.
 

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You can buy a Tesla without at-home charging.

(Waits for "most Tesla owners are likely to have at-home charging" , which simply isn't true)
 

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Seeing as most EV drivers can charge at home, why are Tesla owners different?
The longer range and supercharger network can make a Tesla a reasonable option for someone with a short daily use, no home charging and many long distances trips including straying overnight in hotels.

I find it hard to understand way people will put up with the problems of charging a normal EV without home (or workplace) charging.
 

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I woudlnt try to persuade anyone who cannot charge at home or work into an EV at present.
I'll modify that a little..
I wouldn't try to persuade anyone ... into an EV at present.

One lady heard a talk I gave and bought a s/h Zoe. As far as charging goes, she has a drive but no smartphone. She reluctantly bought a s/h smartphone only to find that it won't run any of the charging apps. With an older s/h Zoe her range is a bit limited.

People can take their own decisions.
 

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I find it hard to understand way people will put up with the problems of charging a normal EV without home (or workplace) charging.
The one person I know who does that with an i3 REx does it because he is a dedicated 'green'. However the local public charger that he used to depend upon is broken and has been for ages. Others at a greater distance are nearly always in use and so he is doing most of his miles at the moment burning petrol rather inefficiently (35 mpg) with the REx running. :(
 

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Interesting bit of news today. BP Chargemaster are putting chargers at MSAs at their BP forecourts. Another encroachment into Ecotricity territory.


BP Chargemaster targets motorway charging network

BP Chargemaster's first 150kW ultra-fast chargers at BP Cranford, near Heathrow (1)

BP Chargemaster is to begin installing ultra-fast charging points at motorway locations with a BP petrol station to help solve the unreliable network on motorway routes.
Ecotricity provides the charging infrastructure at motorway services, but has been criticised for the lack of maintenance and poor service.
“We know the importance of motorway locations and so this year we will have the first forecourt-based motorway locations,” BP Chargemaster COO Dave Newton told Company Car Today.
“The way some agreements are structured means we can’t access service stations, but we can access some where we have BP forecourts. It will hopefully breed confidence about motorway charging and potentially encourage competitors to do the same to create a good network.


It will be interesting to see who follows into the non BP fuel stations...
 

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I woudlnt try to persuade anyone who cannot charge at home or work into an EV at present.
But that doesnt currently matter. Something like 70% of car owners have a drive at home, and presumably a very high % of those could charge. Given waiting lists ranging up to a year out it wouldnot be possible to satisfy anywhere near demand if all of a sudden everyone decided EVs were for them.
So there's plenty of low hanging fruit amongst those who can charge at home or work, once a high enough proportion of cars are EVs that will pull through on the numbers to enable rates to be lowered (and more facilities to be in place) to cater for those who dont have reliable work-or-home charging solutions.
Agreed. 6 weeks into EV ownership and I love the experience, but you still need to be dedicated to run an EV. I use a workplace charger, which is OK but slow (it only runs at an actual 4 kW) and frequently ICEd. I can't see non-enthusiasts getting into EVs unless they have a particular commuting pattern with guaranteed charger availability or just do local trips. Zero carbon by 2050 seems very unlikely without significant and immediate investment to make the EV experience easy for the normal non-enthusiast driver.
 

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BP Chargemaster is to begin installing ultra-fast charging points at motorway locations with a BP petrol station to help solve the unreliable network on motorway routes.
Ecotricity provides the charging infrastructure at motorway services, but has been criticised for the lack of maintenance and poor service.
“We know the importance of motorway locations and so this year we will have the first forecourt-based motorway locations,” BP Chargemaster COO Dave Newton told Company Car Today.
“The way some agreements are structured means we can’t access service stations, but we can access some where we have BP forecourts. It will hopefully breed confidence about motorway charging and potentially encourage competitors to do the same to create a good network
It reads like they are saying "look what we could do if the government removed the legal restrictions. Hear is a preview......"
 

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Fingers crossed this good news also extends to Zoe owners - depends if they include a 50kW triple head Polar unit alongside them like they're doing on some of their other ultra-fast rollouts
 

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It reads like they are saying "look what we could do if the government removed the legal restrictions. Hear is a preview......"
It's never been government restrictions (unless you think the CMA ought to be poking their nose in). The normal model for all the facilities at a service area is that the operator lets exclusive contracts - with Welcome Break having contracted Starbucks for coffee, Burger King for burgers etc. while Roadchef have Costa and McDonalds.

So if you don't like the provision of Ecotricity charging, your complaint should be to the operating groups (Welcome Break, Moto, Roadchef etc) the same as it would be if you don't like the taste of Starbucks coffee.
 

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Given that the government require moterway service stations to provide free wc etc to all in return to letting them have private connections to moterways, is it not reasonable to require quality EV chargers (150kw) with a maximum allowed price and queueing time?
 

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Given that the government require moterway service stations to provide free wc etc to all in return to letting them have private connections to moterways, is it not reasonable to require quality EV chargers (150kw) with a maximum allowed price and queueing time?
It's not unreasonable to require something like that (though "queuing time" sounds problematic), and the government might use the powers they gave themselves in the Automated and Electric Vehicles Act to enforce it.

However, you might then end up with Ecotricity providing the service!

My point was that the "Ecotricity monopoly" isn't government-imposed.
 
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