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I enjoy new technology, and the thought of a long range electric vehicle is really appealing. I’ve had my name down for one since August – so it shouldn’t be too many more months until I get to the top of the queue.

But… can I justify it?

The cost of a Niro Hybrid 4 is £29,555, which with a quick search online, could be bought for £25,937. Compare this to the eNiro at £34,497 and there is a difference of £8,560. (I am assuming no discount is available on the eNiro).

One justification will be the saving in fuel. If the petrol/hybrid engine does 53.3 mpg (combined mpg from spec), I calculate that this will equate to 9.77p/mile (at £1.20 per litre). So if the cost of charging the electric is zero (which it won’t be), that will mean I will have to do at least 87,615 miles to cover the extra cost. Over say, seven years that’s 12,500 miles per year. If the cost of charging the eNiro is 4p/mile (not sure how accurate this is) then that would equate to an additional 148,353 miles or 22,000 miles per year.

I won’t be doing that – perhaps only a quarter. So what are the other benefits:
  • Novelty factor
  • No more trips to the petrol station
  • Environmentally friendly
And the downsides:
  • The faff of plugging in every night
  • The need to buy a charging point
  • Unsightly wires draped across the garden
  • Unable to travel very long distances without careful planning and/or charging delays
  • Uncertain reliability – the clicking noises reported here especially worry me.
  • Uncertain depreciation costs
So my heart says yes, but my head says no.

Have I missed anything?
 

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It’s probably all heart, but just go with it.

If you’re asking for objectivity then you are in the wrong place my friend. :)
 

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One justification will be the saving in fuel. If the petrol/hybrid engine does 53.3 mpg (combined mpg from spec)
Good luck with that, I've never known a car do what the manufacturer says it will

The faff of plugging in every night
There is no faff, you just plug it in and you don't have to do it every night with a 260 mile range unless you are planning on driving about 100,000 miles a year in which case recalculate your ICE fuel savings accordingly

Unsightly wires draped across the garden
It's a black cable, what's unsightly about it?

Unable to travel very long distances without careful planning and/or charging delays
How often do you drive a 260 mile round trip without stopping anyway?

Uncertain reliability – the clicking noises reported here especially worry me.
I have broken down more times in an ICE than an EV even on a mile for mile basis and there's a lot more things to go wrong in the first place

Uncertain depreciation costs
What is depreciation on a hybrid or ICE going to look like in 3 years time, any more uncertain?

But as said by @cah197 if you don't want to make it work, you don't have to, just stick with the easy option and try to make use of every electron you can.
 

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Don't go for the hybrid. Why have the worst of both worlds? i.e. dragging a battery around when on fuel and lugging an engine and fuel around when electric.
The eNero (and Kona for that matter) have perfectly adequate ranges. Also are subject to Olev grant that the Hybrid is not. If you really want to be env friendly and enjoy proper EV motoring then bin the hybrid idea.
 

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A major thing you are missing from the positive list is the torque and joy of electric, vibration free and engine noise free driving. I am always annoyed when I run out of battery on my GTE and can’t stand the feel of an engine idling at traffic lights or in traffic jams. Electric propulsion is massively addictive!

Other than that, @Gif summarises it well above. It really isn’t a faff to plug the car in and if you reframe it as a ‘full tank’ every morning suddenly sounds pretty good!

Finally, if you can genuinely afford it, I would say electric is a head decision, not heart - helping air quality and CO2 emission reductions is very sensible after all.
 

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So we have had a BEV for 5 years now and just about to buy another and will never go back. We have also had a Niro PHEV for 2 years and although miles better than a ordinary hybrid (faster and far more economical) its replacement will be a BEV and maybe an eNiro. Why ? simply because of over 40 years of driving ICE cars a BEV is just so much better. But this is just my opinion and anybody is free to rationalise their decision. My bet though is if you do go ahead you will never look back
 

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Definitely heart for me. Going from a nearly new 66 plate Ceed for about 18k to an e-Niro means I absolutely cannot save money with the EV. But my wife and I are trying to be more environmentally conscious and we really do like the car.
 

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Constants:
Unleaded petrol is currently averaging £5.80 per gallon according to the RAC, my electricity costs 12.217 pence/kWh. A hybrid will attract £135 per year road tax after the first year. I average 3.8 miles per kWh in my Leaf.

My Leaf costs (£0.12217 divided by 3.8) = 3.22 pence per mile to drive.
A 50mpg petrol car would cost (£5.80 divided by 50) = 11.6 pence per mile to drive.

Based on driving 10,314 miles (just to keep the numbers easy) per year:
The cost of driving EV is 10,314 x 3.22p = £332.11
The cost of driving a 50mpg ICE is 10,314 x 11.6p = £1,196.42 plus £135 Road Tax = £1,331.42

The difference in basic running costs per year = £999.31
(With a bit of solar on your roof that would increase as your EV cost per kWh reduced.)

In other words it'll take 9 years to profit from going EV (based on 10,314 miles per year, no solar installation and no other changes in pricing/road tax etc). Yes you currently pay a premium to go EV, even now we're still early adopters and that always costs extra. But the real benefits will be to our grandchildren and great grandchildren who will enjoy any benefits of a quicker reduction in CO2 output as people like us influence those around us to make the change and go EV. In 50 years kids will be horrified that we used to burn fossil fuels and release the toxic gasses into the air we breath. For me it's both head and heart.
 

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Nobody talks about the potential increases in Carbon Taxes, or some such Tax, which are more likely to be loaded on the costs of Petrol or Diesel. Excise Duty on Petrol and Diesel are a big source of revenue for the Exchequer. If 10% of the country moves to EV's, the government need to recoup this 10% from the remaining 90%.

The use of Solar PV will mean that even if Carbon Taxes are loaded on electricity costs., you can avoid a certain amount of home charging usage. However, I reckon that Carbon Taxes on electricity costs, given that they would affect every household in the country, must surely have a direct effect on a countries' inflation
 

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Buying almost any new EV compared to its ICE counterpart is likely to work out more expensive aat the moment. The cheap PCPs and other deals that were around a few years ago are long gone. You have to really want one these days. However there are 2 reasons that you can make it seem more viable. Either purchase now because you think the £3500 government grant is going to disappear soon or wait in the hope that the 95g co2 limit, and fines for not meeting the limit, will result in over supply of EVs this year. Which might happen if ordinary folk really are not keen to buy them. Personally I just refuse to go back to an ICE and will reluctantly pay for the privalidge of having one.
 

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even now i do 80 miles a day, pure economical stand point would take many years to break even to ICE
look at other way, environmental...well we should always try to use our old car till it dead
but i still switch to a 225xe rather than the 225i/220d and likely to change to Mini Electric or MX30 for my next car
ICE will be history, how soon? couldnt tell, may be 20 years or 40 years from now.
You dont need a reason to own an EV, for me buying new car is always a heart decision
if you fancy EV, go EV
 

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I’ve said this before, but you should not compare the e-niro with the niro. They are totally different animals. The e-niro is FAR superior in performance and day-to-day living. It can cost you literally nothing to run all year around if you can charge at work or free places. The niro is the same shape - that’s the only similarity imho.
 

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I’ve said this before, but you should not compare the e-niro with the niro. They are totally different animals. The e-niro is FAR superior in performance and day-to-day living. It can cost you literally nothing to run all year around if you can charge at work or free places. The niro is the same shape - that’s the only similarity imho.
Absolutely. Can't emphasise enough the performance and responsiveness part.
Or the utter blissful, gentle silence depending on your mood.
The hybrids are slow, laggy beasties in comparison with an instant torque 200bhp e-Niro.
My only issue will be the lifespan of my front tyres ?
 
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My only issue will be the lifespan of my front tyres ?
Agree :) Can somebody who wears theirs out first please measure the rear tread at that time so I can calc when to do a front to back swap so I wear all four out about the same time
 

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One justification will be the saving in fuel. If the petrol/hybrid engine does 53.3 mpg (combined mpg from spec), I calculate that this will equate to 9.77p/mile (at £1.20 per litre).
I'm regularly seeing close to £1.30 per litre and I don't think it will be many years before we're seeing £1.50 (I've seen it above £1.40 on the motorway).
 

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I have been driving my Niro PHEV for about 9 months, and put just over 10,000 miles on it in that time, and I really wish I had been more on top of things and just ordered the BEV.
The electric driving experience is much more stressful, because the EV only range is very short indeed. I've done a good deal of long drives, and never been far from a fast charger(which I can't use to charge my PHEV).

From a real world fuel economy point of view, if I have a full charge, then I get something of the order of 70-90 mpg in HEV mode, but at <20% battery, it drops to 50-55 mpg. I would imagine the HEV sees something of this order all the time, probably less, particularly the 4 model with the larger wheels.

Coming from my previous car, there is definitely an improvement in fuel economy, but it's somewhat compromised by having to truck around the extra weight of both a petrol engine, and the electric drivetrain
 

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Agree :) Can somebody who wears theirs out first please measure the rear tread at that time so I can calc when to do a front to back swap so I wear all four out about the same time
Don't worry about it. Golf GTE though not eNiro...

I did it the simple way:
  • fit 4 new tyres;
  • swapped front to back at 5k miles, in reality about ~1mm difference in tyre thread depth;
  • did another swap at 10k (it took 5k to even and another 5k for 1mm difference). That is 15k miles.
  • Considering this approach in another 10k I should be ready for another swap, but chances are at 25k I will need 4 new tyres
 
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Hey @Engeeaitch

A couple of things that may help, although as others have said, you are in the wrong place to find objectivity. If we’re honest, we’re mostly ‘heart’ people here.

1, Have you driven an electric car for longer than a 20 minute test drive? Living with my wife’s Leaf pretty much convinced my that my next (and probably all) future cars of mine would be EV. Lack of engine noise, quick pick up and cheap home refuelling sold me. As well as all the green benefits.

2, Have you looked at options other than pulling the trigger on a lot of money to help you figure it out? I lease mine from a company called Evogo. It’s a three month lease for £550 a month (15k Miles per year rate) and then you hand it back if you want. They had stock in mid Jan - mine was ready around 10 days after I signed up. I’m not connected with them at all, just a happy customer.

Hope this helps


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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I enjoy new technology, and the thought of a long range electric vehicle is really appealing. I’ve had my name down for one since August – so it shouldn’t be too many more months until I get to the top of the queue.

But… can I justify it?

The cost of a Niro Hybrid 4 is £29,555, which with a quick search online, could be bought for £25,937. Compare this to the eNiro at £34,497 and there is a difference of £8,560. (I am assuming no discount is available on the eNiro).

One justification will be the saving in fuel. If the petrol/hybrid engine does 53.3 mpg (combined mpg from spec), I calculate that this will equate to 9.77p/mile (at £1.20 per litre). So if the cost of charging the electric is zero (which it won’t be), that will mean I will have to do at least 87,615 miles to cover the extra cost. Over say, seven years that’s 12,500 miles per year. If the cost of charging the eNiro is 4p/mile (not sure how accurate this is) then that would equate to an additional 148,353 miles or 22,000 miles per year.

I won’t be doing that – perhaps only a quarter. So what are the other benefits:
  • Novelty factor
  • No more trips to the petrol station
  • Environmentally friendly
And the downsides:
  • The faff of plugging in every night
  • The need to buy a charging point
  • Unsightly wires draped across the garden
  • Unable to travel very long distances without careful planning and/or charging delays
  • Uncertain reliability – the clicking noises reported here especially worry me.
  • Uncertain depreciation costs
So my heart says yes, but my head says no.

Have I missed anything?
I can provide pure objectivity. I don't know what 'thinking with your heart' even means.

If you are only doing 5,000 miles a year, then get a bike, use a bus for commuting, and use a taxi for the bits in between.

You can hire a limo service to take you to your annual holiday and still end up with sacks of cash left over after buying a car. Why do you want one?

You have not clarified your current position. Whatever that is, stick with it. Not spending £40k probably means you can retire ~2 years earlier.
 
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