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It seems that with the advent of the facelift Kona Electric Hyundai UK have taken a leaf (no pun intended) out of VW‘s book and are now charging £875 for the heat pump, even on the top-spec new Ultimate model.

They have reduced the base price but I don‘t recall seeing this change mentioned in any of the press releases for the facelift.
 

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It seems that with the advent of the facelift Kona Electric Hyundai UK have taken a leaf (no pun intended) out of VW‘s book and are now charging £825 for the heat pump, even on the top-spec new Ultimate model.

They have reduced the base price but I don‘t recall seeing this change mentioned in any of the press releases for the facelift.
What is a "Heat Pump"?
 

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What is a "Heat Pump"?
It seems that with the advent of the facelift Kona Electric Hyundai UK have taken a leaf (no pun intended) out of VW‘s book and are now charging £825 for the heat pump, even on the top-spec new Ultimate model.

They have reduced the base price but I don‘t recall seeing this change mentioned in any of the press releases for the facelift.
Do they quote a reduced WLTP range for the non heat pump version?
 

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Do they quote a reduced WLTP range for the non heat pump version?
As far as I understand the WLTP is the same with/without a pump because it is carried out at higher temperatures. It is under lower temperatures that the heat pump prevents a loss of range better than cars without. The following is taken from Hyundai's website:

"A study carried out by Korea’s Ministry of the Environment on the Hyundai Kona Electric and Kia Niro EV found that the heat pump significantly reduced battery consumption in cold conditions. When each car was driven in temperatures of -7°C (19°F) with the HVAC system activated, they were able to maintain 90 percent of their driving range compared to journeys undertaken at an ambient 26°C (79°F) – setting a new benchmark for other EVs. By contrast, many EVs offered by other manufacturers saw their total electric driving range drop by between 18 and 43 percent under the same test conditions."
 

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The heat pump harvests wasted heat from various electrical components and uses it to warm the cabin, which increases overall efficiency off the car. The Kia e-Niro still has a heat pump as standard on the top spec model.
Heat pumps harvest heat from the outside air, not waste heat from the electrical systems in the car.
 

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As far as I understand the WLTP is the same with/without a pump because it is carried out at higher temperatures. It is under lower temperatures that the heat pump prevents a loss of range better than cars without.
The other thing to remember is that there’s only a difference when you ask for cabin heat, nothing is more efficient HVAC wise than ‘off’.

You only see some efficiencies or difference in range between a heat pump and no heat pump car if you’re asking for cabin heat.

That said, there might be some benefit if your battery is actively warmed, but it would depend on the exact car and the way the heat pump system has been designed.

My own general feeling after seeing this discussed for years and trying my own experiments driving EVs in the exact same journeys in similar temps with cabin heating on vs off, is it’s a pretty small benefit here in the UK.

I think there is more benefit in Nordic climes etc, where heat pumps are fitted as standard on many EVs, which says it all for me.
 

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Heat pumps harvest heat from the outside air, not waste heat from the electrical systems in the car.
Not strictly the case with all systems.
My 28 kWh Ioniq, has a combined A.C/Heat-pump which has circuits with a water-refrigerant intercooler under the onboard charger and from the motor coolant.
 

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The other thing to remember is that there’s only a difference when you ask for cabin heat, nothing is more efficient HVAC wise than ‘off’.

You only see some efficiencies or difference in range between a heat pump and no heat pump car if you’re asking for cabin heat.

That said, there might be some benefit if your battery is actively warmed, but it would depend on the exact car and the way the heat pump system has been designed.

My own general feeling after seeing this discussed for years and trying my own experiments driving EVs in the exact same journeys in similar temps with cabin heating on vs off, is it’s a pretty small benefit here in the UK.

I think there is more benefit in Nordic climes etc, where heat pumps are fitted as standard on many EVs, which says it all for me.
Check out Bjorn's channel. He's done a number of comparisons of heating systems and their effect on range.
 

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Check out Bjorn's channel. He's done a number of comparisons of heating systems and their effect on range.
I have, I’m a Bjorn patreon, but he’s also Norway based so results are not typical for UK or Southern Europe based drivers.
 

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The other thing to remember is that there’s only a difference when you ask for cabin heat, nothing is more efficient HVAC wise than ‘off’.

You only see some efficiencies or difference in range between a heat pump and no heat pump car if you’re asking for cabin heat.

That said, there might be some benefit if your battery is actively warmed, but it would depend on the exact car and the way the heat pump system has been designed.

My own general feeling after seeing this discussed for years and trying my own experiments driving EVs in the exact same journeys in similar temps with cabin heating on vs off, is it’s a pretty small benefit here in the UK.

I think there is more benefit in Nordic climes etc, where heat pumps are fitted as standard on many EVs, which says it all for me.
My gen 1 Leaf has no heat pump and the consumption of the heater in even cool never mind cold conditions is just silly.
 

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My gen 1 Leaf has no heat pump and the consumption of the heater in even cool never mind cold conditions is just silly.
I did a number of long runs in my old e-Golf, 100% down to 5%, same journey and similar temps, heating on and heating off, the latter just using the heated seats and windscreen.

I got roughly a 5-8% range benefit with heating off if I remember correctly. A heat pump can’t be as efficient as ‘off’, so the main benefit was a few more miles that didn’t change where I had to stop and recharge, but I would say that certainly the benefit of a heated cabin was worth having!

Inside EVs have tried a number of runs in ID.3s with and without heat pumps, and they found the heat pump car consumed more in some circumstances, and there was a small benefit at proper sub zero temps.

There’s either more smoke and mirrors around heat pumps, or they’re poorly implemented in some cars.
 

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It seems that with the advent of the facelift Kona Electric Hyundai UK have taken a leaf (no pun intended) out of VW‘s book and are now charging £825 for the heat pump, even on the top-spec new Ultimate model.

They have reduced the base price but I don‘t recall seeing this change mentioned in any of the press releases for the facelift.
Where have you seen this? The Hyundai UK web site still seems to only show metallic paint as an optional extra - Discover the New Hyundai Kona Electric - Electric SUV | Hyundai UK
 

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Some countries in the EU see Long Cold Winters while others never drop below 10deg C. So it makes sense it's an option.

In UK you need to decide if a Heat Pump is right for you or not. If you don't drive long distance much, especially not in the Winter, then maybe save the cash. If you do long winter road trips then yeah totally worth it. Only you can decide.

Still better it's an option and not a fixed cost/weight addition to the car.
 

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Heat pump is very efficient in countries with mild winters - like UK. Efficiency decreases with falling temperatures. So in -20C heat pumps usually don't have much advantage over resistive heater (it takes a lot of energy to extract eg. 30C heat from -20C air).

Is it smoke and mirrors?? Depends how you look at this.
Pros: Often heat pumps have EER efficiency between 2.5 to 4.5 (eg. you put 1kW into heatpump and you get 3kW heat output; whereas you put 3kw to traditional heater and get roughly 3kW heat)
Cons: Since the car consumes much more power to drive anyway is saving of 1-2kWh for each hour you drive worth £800-1000?

Each of us would have different preference.

Heat scavenging (battery, motror) is something different - worth seeing Bjorn's new TM3 video.
 

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Cons: Since the car consumes much more power to drive anyway is saving of 1-2kWh for each hour you drive worth £800-1000?
Cons: It varies by car, but the side by side tests of the ID.3 whose heat pump was apparently designed for very cold sub zero temps just doesn’t show that much difference.

I agree that when you put it like the above, ie you’ll have 1 to 2 kWh more per hour of driving to put into moving the car rather than heating the cabin, then it doesn’t feel like a very good vfm option.

But damn why would I still get one?! 😂🤷
 
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