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hello all please help me im a novice lol i'm in process of looking to buy my first ev . i am utterly confused by the different charging variants the cost of a full charge for example, there is a charging point down the road it cost 16 p per kwh the bmw is 33 kwh so does that mean its 16 x 33 which is £5.28 to fully charge it or the charging time is say 8 hours does that mean its 16p x 8 which is £1.28

also the charging cables are confusing i would only get the home cable plug in the wall , im assuming i would need another cable if i was charging on the street , though i would like a home charging point

any pointers on these subjects would be very welcome thanks in advance andy
 

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hello all please help me im a novice lol i'm in process of looking to buy my first ev . i am utterly confused by the different charging variants....
Hi Andy, good fun isn't it! :LOL: I recommend the charging guides on ZapMap as a good source to help you make sense of it all.

Cheers!
 

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Costs 16p x 33kWh, but usually only a part charge. BMW can be expensive to repair. Range extender a mixed blessing, or just best to avoid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for reply , as for going for the bmw with range extender its my first foray into an ev i think i need that little extra piece of mind that going all electric would not give me , the bmw im looking at is a good price that i can manage some of the other models out there are very expensive and out my price range ive been looking at the zapmap is it saying the bmw can only ever charge at 11kwh and not use faster chargers
 

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Be careful. The i3 REX isn't that reliable, especially early models so make sure you have extended warranty or deep pockets if you get problems.

What is your driving profile as a full BEV really isn't as hard to live with as some people make out - providing you can charge at home.

The third party lease deals on the ID3 are hard to argue against at present - I don't like VW but agree it is a decent car.
 

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zapmap is it saying the bmw can only ever charge at 11kwh and not use faster chargers
When plugging in to a Chargepoint with AC, you will charge no faster than 7kW single phase, or 11kW 3 Phase. You can charge faster at a DC rapid charger where you'll get up to 50kW.

Also just to clarify, if you see a 22kW AC charging post, or a 100kW DC Rapid charger you can still absolutely use both. Your car will only pull what it needs. It won't damage it.

I'd also like to echo the above. Go full EV. Avoid the range extender. And make sure you have a warranty with the i3 especially.
 

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EGGY
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Charging curve for various i3 models. Basically the higher the rate for longer the more miles range you add for less time sitting around buying coffee. EV driving is a change of mindset, do you have off road parking ? How far do you drive and how often. Do you shop somewhere with charging available ? You may well be able to use a full BEV. We bought a Rex, in 3 years we had recourse to use it probably 4 times and 1 of those was the journey home from the dealer. We ended up using it just to keep it running and ward off potential issues (it kicks in monthly in maintenance mode)

Nice car, great for local driving less so for hammering it up and down motorways. We never had any issues but don't run without a warranty, repairs are likely to be in the thousands as a search of the i3 forum will show
 

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Leaf lover
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We leased i3 with the range extender in 2016 for three years and then added 2 more because we liked it so much. It is a go anywhere car without needing to wear a hair-shirt.
All of our day to day stuff comes from just charging up on the drive overnight. Trips out of range mean you can rapid charge or top up with petrol depending on whats available/convenient.
We now have a Tesla model 3 which my wife hasn't been keen to drive yet so whether we try and hang on to the i3 has yet to be decided. Anyway that option may not be open to us as it's on a PCH.
 

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hello all please help me im a novice lol i'm in process of looking to buy my first ev . i am utterly confused by the different charging variants the cost of a full charge for example, there is a charging point down the road it cost 16 p per kwh the bmw is 33 kwh so does that mean its 16 x 33 which is £5.28 to fully charge it or the charging time is say 8 hours does that mean its 16p x 8 which is £1.28

also the charging cables are confusing i would only get the home cable plug in the wall , im assuming i would need another cable if i was charging on the street , though i would like a home charging point

any pointers on these subjects would be very welcome thanks in advance andy
As said, you generally pay per kWh. Prices vary wildly from free to over 60p/kWh. Some charge point providers also have a connection fee and beware of overstay fees. Domestic prices are around 15-16p/kWh. Rapid chargers tend to be more expensive but it always. The most favoured rapid charge networks are Instavolt and Osprey both of these are in the region of 35p/kWh.

For home charging you’ll want to get a smart meter and switch to a home energy provider like Octopus Energy for their Agile or Go tariffs. Go gives you a few hours of 5p/kWh overnight. Couple with a timer on your car or charge point that’s what you need for the really cheap miles.

Rapid chargers always have a tethered cable. 7-22kW fast chargers tend to require you to have your own. Domestic chargers come in tethered and untethered forms, down to personal preference.
 

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I'm not a fan of REx or other hybrid cars. There has been extensive discussion on here in the past, so no point in going over why some people think REx and other hybrids are good and some think that they are bad.

Worth pointing out that BMW stopped selling the i3 with the REx option in Europe a while ago.

I'm of the opinion that if you want an electric car, it should be just that. Find an electric car that fits in with your usage pattern, but if you can't find one then stick with ICE until there is an electric car available that does fit in with your usage pattern.
 

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MG ZS EV
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hello all please help me im a novice lol i'm in process of looking to buy my first ev . i am utterly confused by the different charging variants the cost of a full charge for example, there is a charging point down the road it cost 16 p per kwh the bmw is 33 kwh so does that mean its 16 x 33 which is £5.28 to fully charge it or the charging time is say 8 hours does that mean its 16p x 8 which is £1.28

also the charging cables are confusing i would only get the home cable plug in the wall , im assuming i would need another cable if i was charging on the street , though i would like a home charging point

any pointers on these subjects would be very welcome thanks in advance andy
Scotland is pretty well organised for public charging. The Scottish Govt and Local Authorities have spaced out the chargers in strategic locations on the tourist routes and there are multiple chargers in cities. Again look at Zap Map and Charge Place Scotland. Also bear in mind that you start from home with a full tank (battery) every morning and that when out and about you plan ahead a little if you are doing a journey longer than the range of the car. You don't fully charge when out and about, usually, just enough to get you to your destination, so the 40-50 mins to 80% charge is probably not going to happen very often. I reckon 2 hours driving is enough at one go and I want a comfort break. The range of my car is 160 miles in summer 130 in winter. If you are in a city the only thing running when you are in a queue is the radio and a bit of heater maybe. Again, if you are making a journey with multiple stops try to charge every time even for a few minutes so that you don't have to wait while you charge when the battery is low. Once you have driven an EV, the simplicity of the driving and quiet will make you wonder why people want noisy ICE cars. Also the running costs are extremely low and the servicing of a full BEV is minimal. No oil, no plugs, no timing chain.... and it is not impossible to repair a battery, there is plenty of information about resurrecting 10 year old leafs by swapping out a few cells on the internet.
Go on, get a few test drives of new ones before you jump in...
 
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