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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is Tony Mak from UK who is interested to start to join EV family. How does the public EV chargers perform? how lone does it take to charge a EV ? thanks!
 

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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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This is Tony Mak from UK who is interested to start to join EV family. How does the public EV chargers perform? how lone does it take to charge a EV ? thanks!
That's a 'how long is a piece of string question'. You need to be more specific otherwise it's like asking which bread should I buy and from which supermarket!

How many miles per day, how many seats, charging at home or only on public chargers, which makes appeal to you ?
What is your budget?
 

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Welcome
How long is a piece of string?
Answer 1, home charging on drive, 30 secs to plug in and 1min to unplug and coil in the morning.
Answer 2, public AC charger (destination charger) approximately 30 Miles per hour plugged in, normally in a carpark when visiting something.
Answer 3, Rapid charger, depends on Car, size of battery, power of the charger and how fast the car can accept a charge, as well as the charge needed, 5 to 120 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's a 'how long is a piece of string question'. You need to be more specific otherwise it's like asking which bread should I buy and from which supermarket!

How many miles per day, how many seats, charging at home or only on public chargers, which makes appeal to you ?
What is your budget?
thank you for quick reply! I don't travel much a day, within 20 miles per day and I don't have a charger at home, so i need to public chargers. I have no idea about EV chargers cost...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome
How long is a piece of string?
Answer 1, home charging on drive, 30 secs to plug in and 1min to unplug and coil in the morning.
Answer 2, public AC charger (destination charger) approximately 30 Miles per hour plugged in, normally in a carpark when visiting something.
Answer 3, Rapid charger, depends on Car, size of battery, power of the charger and how fast the car can accept a charge, as well as the charge needed, 5 to 120 minutes.
thank you for your informative reply, highly appreciated ! I think different between "public" and Rapid" chargers are charging speed and cost, right ?
 

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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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thank you for quick reply! I don't travel much a day, within 20 miles per day and I don't have a charger at home, so i need to public chargers. I have no idea about EV chargers cost...
Something like a mk1 Leaf or Zoe would suit you.
No need to worry about a charger if you are using public ones.
Is there a charger at your destination?
 

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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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thank you for your informative reply, highly appreciated ! I think different between "public" and Rapid" chargers are charging speed and cost, right ?
Public chargers can be AC (slow or fast) or DC (rapid). The cost varies but is around 25-40p+/kwh, and obviously quicker on the rapid chargers.
 

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This is Tony Mak from UK who is interested to start to join EV family. How does the public EV chargers perform? how lone does it take to charge a EV ? thanks!
Welcome. Forgive us if we respond badly to such questions. But they are meaningless without context.
#1 - How do public chargers perform?

Do you mean how do they work? Or how reliable are they?

#2 - How lone (long) does it take to charge an EV?

If it is from a home charger then most cars will receive around 6 kWh's in every hour. If the car's battery is 50 kWh and it is empty at the start then that would be 50/6 = 8 hours approx. Do the maths for any other battery size.

If charging is from public chargers then the same rate of charge will be seen from street-side posts etc. But if a Rapid charger is used on a longer road trip then a typical scenario in a budget EV would be 20% to 80% in around 40 minutes.

After 80% the rate of power transfer becomes much slower and it can easily take another 40 minutes to reach 100%. This is why nobody tries to do that unless they really need a full charge at that time.

If you need more info please give details of the car model you will be driving and if you will have off-road charging at home, along with any specific questions that are troubling you.
 

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"Public" chargers are generally assumed be any that are available to everyone unlike a workplace one or home ones.

An example of a "public" one near me is a pair of 3.6kW units in the local Waitrose. these will charge at 3.6kW per hour, with the average EV doing 4 miles per kWh that is 14miles per hour, there is a maximum park of 3 hours so you could get 40 miles range whils shopping and having a coffee. Cost - these are BP Pulse so £8 month + 16pkWh or PAYG 20p

These are really slow, more common are 7.2kW units at 28 miles per hour, cost on PB Pulse is the same.

Rapids charge 39p -70p per kWh.

Look at ZapMap in your local area to see where the chargers are and what type and costs. From your use you will probably only need to charge once a week without home charging and a free charger at a local Tesco might be really handy whilst you shop :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Something like a mk1 Leaf or Zoe would suit you.
No need to worry about a charger if you are using public ones.
Is there a charger at your destination?
Thank you for your intel, i got many public chargers near me ( just wouldn't know if any available whenever i need it ..)
 

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Hi Tony,

Some off the charging apps show if chargers are available, Zap-map is good likeSpiny said. Tesco's seem to have free Pod point chargers but watch how long you can stay in their car park.
Have you got any off road parking to top up with the charger supplied with the car?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Welcome. Forgive us if we respond badly to such questions. But they are meaningless without context.
#1 - How do public chargers perform?

Do you mean how do they work? Or how reliable are they?

#2 - How lone (long) does it take to charge an EV?

If it is from a home charger then most cars will receive around 6 kWh's in every hour. If the car's battery is 50 kWh and it is empty at the start then that would be 50/6 = 8 hours approx. Do the maths for any other battery size.

If charging is from public chargers then the same rate of charge will be seen from street-side posts etc. But if a Rapid charger is used on a longer road trip then a typical scenario in a budget EV would be 20% to 80% in around 40 minutes.

After 80% the rate of power transfer becomes much slower and it can easily take another 40 minutes to reach 100%. This is why nobody tries to do that unless they really need a full charge at that time.

If you need more info please give details of the car model you will be driving and if you will have off-road charging at home, along with any specific questions that are troubling you.
NO worry to reply freely, all depends on how you read the context and feeling after all.

Most of the public chargers are being occupy when day time ( AC - slow / fast ).

Charging pots are available for Rapid, it depends on the number of power bump.

After 80% the rate of power transfer becomes much slower .... are you saying it happen in Rapid chargers ? or AC - slow / fast ) ? or all public chargers will have the same setting ? Thanks!

I haven't decide which EV yet, still need to know it better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
"Public" chargers are generally assumed be any that are available to everyone unlike a workplace one or home ones.

An example of a "public" one near me is a pair of 3.6kW units in the local Waitrose. these will charge at 3.6kW per hour, with the average EV doing 4 miles per kWh that is 14miles per hour, there is a maximum park of 3 hours so you could get 40 miles range whils shopping and having a coffee. Cost - these are BP Pluse so £8 month + 16pkWh or PAYG 20p

These are really slow, more common are 7.2kW units at 28 miles per hour, cost on PB Pulse is the same.

Rapids charge 39p -70p per kWh.

Look at ZapMap in your local area to see where the chargers are and what type and costs. From your use you will probably only need to charge once a week without home charging and a free charger at a local Tesco might be really handy whilst you shop :)
Thanks! Your insight are very helpful to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi Tony,

Some off the charging apps show if chargers are available, Zap-map is good likeSpiny said. Tesco's seem to have free Pod point chargers but watch how long you can stay in their car park.
Have you got any off road parking to top up with the charger supplied with the car?
Hi Harry,

Yes, I installed a few apps for EV chargers, Zap-map, Pod point... etc. Still learning how to use it... ( youtube can help ). No, i haven't got any off road parking to top up with charger, that's why i need more insight. Thanks!
 

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thank you for quick reply! I don't travel much a day, within 20 miles per day and I don't have a charger at home, so i need to public chargers. I have no idea about EV chargers cost...
Being able to charge at home, off-road is a big advantage in terms of convenience and cost. If you are solely reliant on public chargers then your location becomes super important as the public network is quite patchy. Would you be happy to offer your approximate location (village, town, city, London borough) as that might help us to help you more?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Being able to charge at home, off-road is a big advantage in terms of convenience and cost. If you are solely reliant on public chargers then your location becomes super important as the public network is quite patchy. Would you be happy to offer your approximate location (village, town, city, London borough) as that might help us to help you more?
Hi Jason,

Thanks for yr reply! Totally agree with you that my location super important ... i live in a town.
 

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After 80% the rate of power transfer becomes much slower .... are you saying it happen in Rapid chargers ? or AC - slow / fast ) ? or all public chargers will have the same setting ?
The speed of charging on a Rapid charger varies a lot over the session. It's called a 'charging curve' and different cars have different settings designed by the manufacturer to either protect the battery or satisfy their own management control units. This is an explanation of the charge curve by Fastned. The curve shown is just one example and each car has a different curve which can be discovered once you decide on what you will buy.

What determines the charge speed? – Fastned support

This is the charge curve for the Hyundai Ioniq. As you can see, it is different for each model and whether it is connected to a 50 kWh or 150 kWh Rapid.

Charging with a Hyundai Ioniq – Fastned support


Also, the charge session greatly depends on the condition of the car's battery when it is plugged in. If the battery is very hot following a fast drive then the power will be limited to avoid further damage.

As a general explanation, if the battery has a very low state of charge when plugged in then the Rapid will send power in there very quickly until it is partly full. It will usually then start to ramp down the speed gradually until it is about 80% full at which time it will really slow the power transfer down until at 95% it is barely a trickle charge.

That effect is not as noticeable with a street-side 7 Kw charger but, again, it will slow down over the last few % until full. But as such charging will take some hours then the last bit taking a while longer is not noticed in the overall time involved.
 

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A lot of Tesco stores have free chargers ( well the lower power ones) mines has a couple of 7Kw a couple of 22Kw and a Rapid 50Kw for which I think I paid 25p a Kw, only used this once, but generally top up while I shop each week so about 35 miles if I take an hour to shop. What is your journey profile, if you never do long trips then a car with a smaller battery will work fine. My 64Kw E- Niro is showing around 300 from a full charge, and covers my longer journeys. Pick a car that meets your needs, boot size, seats etc then consider the electric side of things in addition.
 

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With a 20 mile commute in a UK town you’ll be fine without home charging. We all eventually find our preferred public chargers on the balance of location/reliability/cost/coffee/dog pooping possibilities. Best of luck in your search.
 
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