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Went from a ford cmax energi, I can't remember the max charge rate, to a 2020 bolt and I'm using the same ~2 year old aftermarket 220/240 32amp aftermarket charging cable. I had a nema 14-50 plug added to my garage, 6 gauge wire, 50 amp fuse, 12 inch from the bottom of my electric box permitted and inspected. No issues charging the cmax, cable did not get hot at all. Just chargd my Bolt from 15%-100%, lets say 8 hours of charging, was charging at the full 32amps per the display on the charger. Now the head of the plug gets pretty damn hot. It was 75F in my garage and the temp gauge on the display of my charger got up to 125F. I'm trying to determine if this is "normal" or "expected". The manufacturer says its normal up to 150F and they test up to 180F. Seems pretty hot to me. Outlet is cool, its the plug head and the first 18 inches of the cable is pretty warm, rest of the cable is barely warm. No sign of melting, no bad smell, pulled out the plug and the 4 pins, while hot, are clean, no plastic etc.

Matt
 

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The connectors should be large enough to handle the current. That they are getting hot suggests sparking. Do they have any tarnish or black bits?
 

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The connectors should be large enough to handle the current. That they are getting hot suggests sparking. Do they have any tarnish or black bits?
No tarnishing, melted material etc. The prongs look good. I'm just really trying to gauge how much heat is okay.
 

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Went from a ford cmax energi, I can't remember the max charge rate
On a quick search it's 3.3kW, so half or less than the Bolt. So I'd expect all the cables and connectors to run significantly warmer.
How much is OK I don't know - we don't have NEMA in Europe, so maybe one of the few US forum members can help out.

The temperatures you quote from 'the manufacturer' ... For which part of the system and are those ambient temps or actual component temperature? And if the latter case, which part? (Eg, plug pins will be hotter than the casing.)
 

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The Nema plug looks too small for regular charging, ok for occasional use, but regular you are best getting a wired up type 2/1 charge point.
 

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How much is OK I don't know - we don't have NEMA in Europe, so maybe one of the few US forum members can help out.
The Nema plug looks too small for regular charging,
NEMA 15-50 should be fine for 7kW. That is about 32Amps @ 240Volts.

NEMA 15-50 is rated 250V 3-phase 50A. NEMA 15 is usually 3-phase + ground. It can be wired up split phase + ground.

NEMA 14 is the standard 4 wire split phase connetor (hot, hot, netural ground)


I moved to the UK before home EVSE installs were common. I'd have guessed NEMA 14-30 and 14-50 since they are common in homes already. 14-30 is used for electric dryers and 14-50 for electric ranges (cookers).


Plug should not be getting hot. Warm is ok but not hot. Either the plug, socket or the wires into the socket are not making a good connection. All should be clean, bright and tight. Try swapping in a different EVSE and see if that one gets hot???

< shrug > I'm not an electrcian.

If OP can't figure it out, get the electrician back in to check connection.




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If the plug is sealed, the only thing you can do is check the wiring and connections to the outlet itself. It might be worth just installing a new high quality outlet, as your existing one might simply be worn out from years of use. I dont know the favoured brands in the US, but pick something high quality.

If the outlet is good, but the plug is heating up, that suggests a bad connection inside it. It might be an option to remove the original plug and fit a new one, but given it appears to have temperature monitoring, that might not be easy.
 
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