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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know that the Leaf has FLEX on the document for battery lease and if you buy your battery out from Nissan they send the document away to have it removed.
BUT I have just come across a Zoe for sale and in the adverts title it says (with batteries) and then there is no mention of the batteries in the advert again. That is not saying NO LEASE and for a 2015 at £6,999 I suspect not. Someone may get a big shock a few weeks later.
So back to my question,how do you know, or how does the seller PROVE it?
 

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Discussion Starter #5

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If you can get the reg then you can use the autotrader vehicle checker to see if it’s an ‘i’ model (batteries included). £7k sounds like a great price, I picked a similar one up for £7.7k recently (albeit half the mileage & from a dealer) which I thought was a bargain. The i model is very rare and you don’t usually see them advertised for less than £9k.

It would be useful to know whether it’s had the Battery Management System update, as if not its likely that the state of health of the battery could be quite low given the mileage. If not it’s not a major issue as you should be able to get Renault to do this for you, presumably providing there is a full service history.

This may all be moot as I wouldn’t expect an i to hang around too long at that price!

Edit - a couple of things suggest that it’s an i model - the £23k that the seller says he paid new and the 50k mileage. Nobody would’ve paid that price for a lease model (it sounds steep for an i!) and the i model works out better for higher mileages.
 

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If the vendor says, in writing (ie on the receipt) batteries are included then they are liable.

My understanding is that the law has changed with cars and if a bona fide purchaser has bought something the vendor had no right to sell, then the true owner has to chase THE VENDOR for the item/money, they can't claim back the thing from the new bona fide purchaser.

The thing being that the owner has to chase and claim from the vendor, not the bona fide buyer.

I believe this was a change in the law in the last round of consumer regulations, to avoid the often repeated scenario of people suddenly losing their car as the police take it off them saying it wasn't theirs.

I am happy to be corrected on this, I have not been in the situation to test this.

2015 was the first year of the "-i" so it is not impossible. There were a few nearly new for £11k to £12k back then, so 50,000 miles for £4k would still have been cheap motoring for the guy, at 3p/mile fuel, he might just be passing on a good deal.
 
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