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Hi I am converting my ENV200 into a camper van. I will only ever use the electrics when I am plugged in at a camp site so it makes no sense to install an extra leasure battery.
Does anyone know how I would take power directly from the battery and how to do this safely?
 

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Nissan E-NV200 Tekna Panel Van, 24kWh Battery, Kia Soul EV 27 kWh, BMW i3 94ah REX
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Hi I am converting my ENV200 into a camper van. I will only ever use the electrics when I am plugged in at a camp site so it makes no sense to install an extra leasure battery.
Does anyone know how I would take power directly from the battery and how to do this safely?
Look no further!

 

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Nissan E-NV200 Tekna Panel Van, 24kWh Battery, Kia Soul EV 27 kWh, BMW i3 94ah REX
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If you follow the links you'll find a comprehensive list of materials and "what to do's.."
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If you follow the links you'll find a comprehensive list of materials and "what to do's.."
Thanks Jack, Thats great. is this your van?
So from watching that, it looks like they use the 12v battery (already under the bonet) for starting the van to also charge with the solar panel and for lights and coolbox. So use this for smaller electrical items.
Then they use a separate system directly from a plug, installed under the bonnet for 240v, so this is for more draining alliances like the hob, kettle, toaster, laptop ....
So no need to tap into the vans batteries, keep them for driving.
Does that sound right?
 

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Tapping into the vans HV battery is a risky business as the voltage is ~ 400volts, and you would need to do something to turn on the connection to the battery which is controlled within the battery case and would then turn on the rest of the van's systems in the sameway as having the car ready to drive. There is a 1000W DC : DC convertor already built in but you may not view that as sufficient to power your "more draining appliances". Using a split system as in the example above allows the owner to know that sufficient capacity will remain to start the van even if the owner discharges the other battery too much. I'd recommend a split charge system with a second battery like a touring caravan to get the best of both worlds.
 

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Nissan E-NV200 Tekna Panel Van, 24kWh Battery, Kia Soul EV 27 kWh, BMW i3 94ah REX
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Thanks Jack, Thats great. is this your van?
So from watching that, it looks like they use the 12v battery (already under the bonet) for starting the van to also charge with the solar panel and for lights and coolbox. So use this for smaller electrical items.
Then they use a separate system directly from a plug, installed under the bonnet for 240v, so this is for more draining alliances like the hob, kettle, toaster, laptop ....
So no need to tap into the vans batteries, keep them for driving.
Does that sound right?
I wish it were but, alas no, it's Glyn Hudson's van
 

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Nissan E-NV200 Tekna Panel Van, 24kWh Battery, Kia Soul EV 27 kWh, BMW i3 94ah REX
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Thanks Jack, Thats great. is this your van?
So from watching that, it looks like they use the 12v battery (already under the bonet) for starting the van to also charge with the solar panel and for lights and coolbox. So use this for smaller electrical items.
Then they use a separate system directly from a plug, installed under the bonnet for 240v, so this is for more draining alliances like the hob, kettle, toaster, laptop ....
So no need to tap into the vans batteries, keep them for driving.
Does that sound right?
I can't answer for Glyn Hudson but I assume exactly the same as you! He splits the ac from charging point and has a clever bit of kit [he developed?...I think...] to alter the current to match the supply.
 

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Nissan E-NV200 Tekna Panel Van, 24kWh Battery, Kia Soul EV 27 kWh, BMW i3 94ah REX
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I just read your initial question where you say you'll only use the electrics when you're plugged in at a camp-site?
In that case the easiest solution is to fit a small Consumer Unit hooked up to a Commando Socket so you can plug in just like caravans do. That way you have a 240vac supply which is completely decoupled from your 12v battery.
 

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I believe that Japanese ENV200's actually have a 110 V ac socket in the back. I wonder if you could fit the kit to a British van, and then get some American appliances to plug in?
 

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Nissan e-NV200 (converted campervan)
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Yes, I use the main 12V battery for my campervan. I agree, there is no point fitting a leisure battery when there is so much energy stored in the HV battery, just leave the van switched on with the DC-DC converter running to continuously rechange the 12V. Here's my 12V wiring diagram:

139535


I also have a 240V hookup with a mini consumer unit and a couple of plug sockets in the van for when on a campsite hookup.

I recently upgraded the size of the cable run to the battery, so I can run a powerful 240V inverter to power a induction hob. It works great, here's an update video:

 

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Nissan e-NV200 (converted campervan)
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There is a 1000W DC : DC convertor
The DC-DC convertor is actually 135 Amps (approx 1.7KW), if you do draw more power than this the extra power would be provided by the 12V battery. Although to be on the safe side I wouldn't recommend drawing more than 1kW for any length of time. My Vango Sizzle induction hob is 700W
 
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