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This is my label showing the definitive that the car has the 6.6kVA but for quickness it's easier to look at the dash charge screen for the 3kW and 6kW



 

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This is my label showing the definitive that the car has the 6.6kVA but for quickness it's easier to look at the dash charge screen for the 3kW and 6kW



Apparently three orange cables signify 6.6kw see vid from 11 mins in
My car has three cables but a 3.6 charger according to the label. Can anyone tell me if the label is wrong or the three cable rule is not correct?
 

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My car has three cables but a 3.6 charger according to the label. Can anyone tell me if the label is wrong or the three cable rule is not correct?
Three cable 'rule' is incorrect. All cars with DC rapid charging have the three orange cables.Dash display and the 'engine' plate are the ways to check for 3.3 or 6.6 kW charger fit.
 

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My car has three cables but a 3.6 charger according to the label. Can anyone tell me if the label is wrong or the three cable rule is not correct?
There are two orange cables from the DC CHAdeMO socket and one from the AC socket, so he is incorrect. He also incorrectly states that the solar spoiler comes as standard with the Tekna model, it's a £300 option for all models.
If you only have the 3kW shown on your charge time display then you have the standard 3.3kW charger.
 

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There are two orange cables from the DC CHAdeMO socket and one from the AC socket, so he is incorrect. He also incorrectly states that the solar spoiler comes as standard with the Tekna model, it's a £300 option for all models.
If you only have the 3kW shown on your charge time display then you have the standard 3.3kW charger.
Ok thanks this confirmed my initial thoughts and the reply above.
 

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I have a 7kW charger at home, and sometimes wished it had a dial to turn it down a bit - or automatically adjust for sunshine levels so I can make the most out of my PV array on the roof.
Supposing you changed the charge cable to the 3.3kW one would you only charge at 3.3kW. From recent looking, I think a resistance value between the CP pin and another pin on the J1772 connector determines the charging current. Anyone agree?

I'm with you on the automatic adjustment for sunshine levels. I'm in the process of installing 3kW of solar. Will not get anything for it from the grid if it goes up there so the obvious thing is to use the power to charge the car. But I wouldn't want to be paying high tariff rates if the sun goes behind the cloud. I wonder is there a solution. If what I'm saying above is true, maybe the resistance value is linearly related to the charge current??

On the "knowing what your getting" topic, I think from reading this thread that the 6.6kW charger that was supposed to be in a '15 Leaf that I've just bought isn't there either. At least I don't get the 2 timings for charging on the display. Must look for the label that Cath referred to.
 

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......
Quite worrying that Dealers don't know what they are selling.
you could use that phrase for pretty much Any EV- PHEV model , most go on about ' leather seats & satnav ' -
you'd know that already , but would like info on battery charge & whether the accompanying leads have been checked as working
 
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Supposing you changed the charge cable to the 3.3kW one would you only charge at 3.3kW. From recent looking, I think a resistance value between the CP pin and another pin on the J1772 connector determines the charging current. Anyone agree?

I'm with you on the automatic adjustment for sunshine levels. I'm in the process of installing 3kW of solar. Will not get anything for it from the grid if it goes up there so the obvious thing is to use the power to charge the car. But I wouldn't want to be paying high tariff rates if the sun goes behind the cloud. I wonder is there a solution. If what I'm saying above is true, maybe the resistance value is linearly related to the charge current??

On the "knowing what your getting" topic, I think from reading this thread that the 6.6kW charger that was supposed to be in a '15 Leaf that I've just bought isn't there either. At least I don't get the 2 timings for charging on the display. Must look for the label that Cath referred to.

I'm investigating if an immersion controller can be used to dial down the car current, I will report back if I get some info.

I just got a7kw point installed (planning on future proofing) and plugged in my 2014 leaf and found out it was drawing 6.6kw yet was sold second hand as a 3.3kw. So far every second hand car I investigated I was told was 3.3 charger and I was quite surprised that no one had appeared to take up the 6.6kw - probably they were all 6.6kw and the dealers just didn't know.
 

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I just got a7kw point installed (planning on future proofing) and plugged in my 2014 leaf and found out it was drawing 6.6kw yet was sold second hand as a 3.3kw.
If your car is fitted with the 6.6Kw charger when you plug in the display will show two times to full charge. One time at 3.3Kw and another time for 6.6Kw. If the car only has the 3.3Kw charger on board it won't show the faster time there.
 

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If your car is fitted with the 6.6Kw charger when you plug in the display will show two times to full charge. One time at 3.3Kw and another time for 6.6Kw. If the car only has the 3.3Kw charger on board it won't show the faster time there.

Yes it shows both times. That's my point the dealer didn't know it was 3.3kw, and undersold a £1000 upgrade!!
 

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I've just picked up my first leaf. It took two attempts for RCI to deliver a 6.6 to the dealership before the managed a 6.6 on the third attempt. The dealers didn't notice (more likely didn't check as they assumed RCI would know their inventory - completely reasonable) and I picked it up on the video they sent me when it was delivered when I noticed only one charge time displayed on the dash.

When the second was on the lorry to the dealer they got a call/email saying it probably wasn't a 6.6. Luckily the third was!

The dealer told me they invoiced RCI £1000 for the first car, I don't know whether RCI paid that though.
 

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is it correct that all 30 kWh are 6.6 charge ?
No it's still a £1150 upgrade option, however with the 30kWh model regardless of on-board charger size you do get both cables, 3 pin EVSE in a bag and a 5m 32A Type 2-Type 1 cable in a box.
 

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i have nissan leaf 3.3 if i buy charger 6.6, is it possible to charge my car and it doesnt demage my car battery .
Charge unit rated at 7 kW (or even 22 kW) will not harm your 3.6 kW Leaf.

The car will just merrily take only enough electricity to charge at 3.6 kW per hour, no matter how much is offered.

We all tend to incorrectly refer to the electric supply units, whether they be 16 amp or 32 amp, we can have installed on our homes as chargers.
They are not.
The charger is built into the car.
The Nissan Leaf has two options, 3.6 kW or 6.6 kW onboard charger.

230 volts at 16 amps is 3680 watts or 3.68 kW, just enough to supply a 3.6 kW Leaf at maximum power.

230 volts at 32 amps is 7360 watts or 7.36 kW, so this is what you need to supply a 6.6 kW onboard charger equipped Leaf at it's full capacity.

The unit fitted to your house, or in the street / car parks, is purely an electric supply unit not a charger. It supplies AC (alternating current) electricity to your car's built in charger, which then converts this into DC (direct current) to charge your battery. Battery can only take DC.

Rapid chargers are actually chargers.
Their heavy duty cables and plugs (CHAdeMO in the case of a Leaf) supply typically 43 kW of DC (direct current) straight to your cars battery. Your onboard charger is bypassed. If an onboard charger broke you could still use the car if you had access to rapid chargers.

If you are lucky enough to find a rapid dispensing 400 volts at 106 amps (maximum I've found) you are charging at 42.4 kW.
Unfortunately most run quite a bit slower than this.

Supposedly these units are rated as 50 kW.
You'd need to see 125 amps at 400 volts displayed on the screen, for this to be the case.
 

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[QUOTE="johnleaf, post: 305327, member: 5259" If what I'm saying above is true, maybe the resistance value is linearly related to the charge current??[/QUOTE]

I think it is a step function if the EVSE detects resistance in a certain band it selects the appropriate current by sending a mark-space ratio square wave to the car charger. The choices would be 32A, 16A, 10A, 7A I think. If the EVSE and lead are both 32A then the mark-space will be for 32A but the car charger will only draw 16A if it is a 3.3 car.
 

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I'm investigating if an immersion controller can be used to dial down the car current, I will report back if I get some info.
Immersion controller is designed for a resistive load and caters for this by lowing the voltage.. this wont work with batt charger that is trying to pull the full load based on voltage and amps.. if the voltage is too low it will just shut down and error. Only way to vary the charge rate is to change the pulse modulation send to the car over pilot pins to IEC 62196 standards to tell the car to charge at different rate. Some people have got this working with a Mainpine EVSE controller and various resistors. Bit complex to hook in with solar generation but i've got a simple 13amp socket switched on by relay when solar generation is over 1.6kw and off when under 1.2kw
 
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