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Now enjoying my new Kia SOUL EV
2020 Hyundai Ioniq Electric (38.3 kWh) Premium SE in Iron Grey with Shale Grey Interior option
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I think that could be quite an interesting model and fantastic to see so many options being developed. The momentum is building....

 
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28Kw battery, 105 mile real world range. I for one am disappointed. Hyundai IONIQ Electric Has A 28 kWh Battery, 105 Miles Real Range
Shame... If it was more like 36kWh (130 real world range) I would have definitely considered this for my next car. I'll just keep my LEAF until a 40kWh model comes along which more than likely will be the Model 3.

Great to see Hyundai developing BEV's though. Shame they have been wasting their time with Hydrogen.
 

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I can see the PHEV in particular selling really rather well for them, at the very least there will be good number of Ampera drivers out there up for renewal with little else out there meeting their requirements.

I can also see it being a gateway drug for a new raft of EVers too

Interesting that the BEV is only 28kwh I've seen other articles where they have stated the real life range to be comfortably better than their competitor beggining with an N's car (sic)

another news story here

Hyundai IONIQ to debut with hybrid, plug-in and electric powertrains
 

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... number of Ampera drivers ... with little else out there meeting their requirements....
This is very true. Lets see if any of the 3 Ioniqs tickles my tastebuds:

a) IONIQ Electric ... 28 kWh (unknown whether total, or useable) ... estimated range of over 155 miles at up to 103mph using its 118bhp motor
So, a BEV. Nice beefy motor :) but I have Range Anxiety, :(. Sorry, not for me.

Let's see what the ICEd varieties offer:

"IONIQ Hybrid and IONIQ Plug-in both feature the new Kappa 1.6-litre GDI, direct injection petrol, four-cylinder engine with 103bhp combined with a six-speed dual-clutch transmission and an electric motor."

Oh dear, they got it wrong, failed to use large electrics & small ICE, would have let them totally discard the complex 6-speed gearbox and fit a smaller ICE with more batteries instead. GM's Ampera got this right.

b) IONIQ Hybrid’s electric motor delivers 43bhp and will offer targeted CO2 emissions from 79g/km. Battery capacity 28 kWh. (unknown whether total, or useable).

Ok, so this is the Prius-style hybrid, no plugin, but suitable for homeowners who can't run a cable to their car.
43bhp means any motorway driving _must_ use ICE. Sorry, this model doesn't cut the mustard. But there's the plugin!

c) IONIQ Plug-in Hybrid gets a 61bhp electric motor and will offer a 31-mile electric range.
Battery 8.9 kWh - similar to VW GTe, it looks to me.

Oh dear, still has tiny electrics, any motorway driving _must_ use ICE. 31 miles isn't much - I get that in winter, and 45 in summer. I bet that's their summer distance! There will still be a lot of Ampera drivers waiting for a suitable replacement to appear. This isn't it. Back to the drawing board, Hyundai!

edit: added battery info.
 

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Another car that supports 100kw DC. I wonder how long it can actually pull that with its 28kWh battery before it tapers.
 

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Another car that supports 100kw DC. I wonder how long it can actually pull that with its 28kWh battery before it tapers.
Unfortunately it's 100kW CHAdeMO, not CCS. Is the 100kW CCS standard sorted yet? Won't be able to sell it in Europe with that connector so we're likely to only see 50kW charging.

Although as you say, pulling 100kW on a 28kWh battery is a bit pointless, it will be into taper before it even starts.

Still, it's good to see three versions of the same car. That's a good way to drive costs down, even if it does come with compromises at the moment. Same approach that VW have taken.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Won't be able to sell it in Europe with that connector so we're likely to only see 50kW charging
They already do on the Soul and isn't there at least one 100kW charger on the ground?

pulling 100kW on a 28kWh battery is a bit pointless, it will be into taper before it even starts
It totally depends on the battery chemistry.
 

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They already do on the Soul and isn't there at least one 100kW charger on the ground?
Yes, however, the Soul is type-approved already so they can keep selling it. There are 100kW posts at Kia headquarters (interestingly, I am sure someone said they were multi-head with CCS as well ... but no idea if the CCS has 100kW too).

It totally depends on the battery chemistry.
Interesting, I can't find the chemistry for the ioniq (haven't looked hard, to be fair). Can you do a non-taper chemistry which is also air cooled (Leaf/Zoe etc.)
 

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should be just a bit less than 30kw leaf IRL.
Reading earlier articles and comments by Hyundai reps it sounds as if the design brief for the pure EV varient was just to build a slightly better car than a leaf. Either they didnt anticipate the increase in capacity in the improved leaf or they cant do it at a reasonable cost.
It will be interesting to see if the abilty to produce hybrid, plug-in hybrid and pure BEV on the same platform translates into a competitive advantage and to see how many manufacturers follow a similar path and how many prefer to optimize each platform to a specific type of drive train
 

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A cynic might suggest that there is a lot of built in gradual obsolescence going on with new EV models except Tesla and Chevrolet/Opel who seem genuinely committed to delivering an affordable long range EV as soon as they can.

Drivers are buying or leasing the best new affordable EV on the market, knowing full well that there will be better cars on the market in 2-3 years time but not so much better as to prevent many from upgrading to the best current model in the interim. There is great business logic in Nissan, Hyundai, BMW and others drip-feeding the market a slightly longer range car every 18 months or so, rather than releasing a game-changer which would decimate the existing affordable EV sector overnight. I think this is Nissan's thinking behind continually releasing slightly longer range Leafs rather than going all-out in the race to release the best car it possibly can.

Maybe I am guilty of floating a crazy conspiracy theory but it would chime with Hairy Leafer's remarks above - most manufacturers' aim is to lead the EV niche market, and stay just ahead of the competition, not to transform the transport industry!
 
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