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30KW Tekna (2017)
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Discussion Starter #1
So while my beloved Leaf 30 is having its weak cells investigated at dealership, I have had last years 40kw leaf Tekna to play with.

Now I have been longing for one pedal driving, thinking I was missing out on something in my Leaf 30 by having to make do with B mode, but I just cannot get used to it.

I find it hard to judge exactly when I will come to a full stop at varying speeds and I conscious the break lights may be on of I take my foot off it completely, what I tend to do when entering a right corner in B mode.

So now although I love the new Leaf and May well be upgrading next year, I don’t feel In missing out anymore!
 

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2019 Leaf 40
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E Pedal isn't that good for anything other than stop start slow town driving. It's not got the refinement or sufficient braking power for speeds above about 30 unless you want to be quite slow. A few times even with full lift I felt you either had to lift off several car lengths further back or use the brake. In B mode it does seem easier to judge even though e pedal in B mode should be as consistent.

I did one journey with it on all the way there and back. It's poor at slow manoeuvring as well. Much better to use brake pedal to keep the car slow and have it in a normal mode.

Some people love it but I'm not a fan. It's just too crude.
 

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30KW Tekna (2017)
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Discussion Starter #5
Yes I merrily speed up to a big roundabout expecting it to brake, it didn’t! Lol

Biggest annoyance I found was reverse parking, it then does stop the car abruptly, I guess I’m used to lifting my foot off too much, it’s probably my poor driving technique.

It’sa lovely car tho and I can feel the oomph. I had to drive my leaf 30 to help the garage run the battery down to 25% and going from the 40 made my leaf feel very dated!!!!
 

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I prefer the reference of 'Golf Buggy Mode' which some carts also use the same single peddle method.
Personally its not my preferred driving option, taking a little more concentration to get the braking distance correct.
 

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I feel like we’re in the minority here. It’s the same with the BMW i3 which is basically always stuck in a similar mode to e-pedal and can’t be disabled.

Any time I say I don’t like that feature in either the LEAF or i3 I always seem to be met with shock and people tell me I’m wrong.

For me, any amount of automatic regen than is enough to cause the brake lights to come on is too much regen. I’m much happier with two pedals and full control of slowing at the rate I want to slow down and actually stopping in the right place.
 

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So while my beloved Leaf 30 is having its weak cells investigated at dealership, I have had last years 40kw leaf Tekna to play with.

Now I have been longing for one pedal driving, thinking I was missing out on something in my Leaf 30 by having to make do with B mode, but I just cannot get used to it.

I find it hard to judge exactly when I will come to a full stop at varying speeds and I conscious the break lights may be on of I take my foot off it completely, what I tend to do when entering a right corner in B mode.

So now although I love the new Leaf and May well be upgrading next year, I don’t feel In missing out anymore!
I don't hate it but also don't necessarily like it. My wife loves it. It's her car, so it's good that she loves it. Anyway, it takes some time to get used to it, but I learned after a couple of driving session with an open mind without negative emotions. Really, not rocket science, and if you give it a chance, you may even like it. However, if you don't like it at all, you don't have to use it. In my wife's car, we did not set it as default at start up, but engaging it when we want to use it. Yes, the break lights turn on when you remove your foot from the pedal. The idea is that you remove your foot when you want to stop. If you just want to reduce speed a bit then you release the pressure, but not completely. Why would you remove your foot in a right turn...? If you have e-pedal on then the car comes to a halt BEFORE you get around the bend, so why do you do that? ...and why in right turn...? I think the e-pedal is good, but I rarely drive the Leaf, so I am not used to it as much as my wife is.
 

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I quite like e-pedal when in a stop-start traffic jam. Wouldn't touch it with a barge pole under any other circumstances.
Why is that? I mean, in "other circumstances". What's the difference between using the e-pedal on highway and not using e-pedal? The normal breaks work even with e-pedal, and in my opinion, in long non-stop drives e-padal is not different from normal two pedals use of the car.
 

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30KW Tekna (2017)
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Discussion Starter #13
I think that’s it, I’m so used to taking my foot off when day turning I have to relearn to keep it on, seems alien to me.

and when reversing I’m used to an automatic going into slow mode work foot off, not being bought to an abrupt stop!
 

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I feel like we’re in the minority here. It’s the same with the BMW i3 which is basically always stuck in a similar mode to e-pedal and can’t be disabled.

Any time I say I don’t like that feature in either the LEAF or i3 I always seem to be met with shock and people tell me I’m wrong.

For me, any amount of automatic regen than is enough to cause the brake lights to come on is too much regen. I’m much happier with two pedals and full control of slowing at the rate I want to slow down and actually stopping in the right place.
I don't know where you get this from. I mean, as far as I know, the break lights does NOT come on in every regen situation, at least not in my BMW 330e and our Leaf Tekna. I also see a lot of Teslas and i3 driving long downhill without break lights. Now, I don't know the i3, but my 330e is coasting downhill and it generates electricity for charging and it does that without break lights. Same with the Leaf we have. Anyway, the e-pedal is an option in the Leaf, you have a separate switch and also can set it up to be the default mode at starting. Are you sure you can't do that in the i3...? Change the default start mode is an option even in my 330e, but it does not have the e-pedal feature.
 

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2020 BMW i3S 120Ah BEV
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Yes the brake lights come on in the i3 when you take your foot off the pedal and it's in full regen braking.

I find it hard to balance in the i3 too. It's great in stop start driving but once you're on the motorway I really want to turn it down... I'd like to switch to a brake pedal that enables full regen in the first part of its movement, then enables friction braking if I want more.

It's true however that at very high speeds regen just isn't that effective which takes the edge off the twitchiness of the pedal response and somewhat eases your cramping right foot. And cruise control isn't as easy to set as it should be in the circumstances either, nor as reliable. I would say that the natural decrease in torque-present-at-the-wheels caused by changing your ICE to a higher gear ratio provides a much easier to control cruising experience compared to EVs such as the i3 with a full-on-regen-all-the-time experience. Really, it shouldn't be hard to offer both levels either based on current speed or based on a simple user input.

Can anyone explain what's the difference between "B" mode and "e-pedal"? I have an i3, it has no controls..
 

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2019 Leaf 40
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B mode in the Leaf is stronger regen than D but it doesn't bring the car to a complete stop. E Pedal does. The accelerator response is also different. E Pedal is far softer on acceleration and braking is harsher especially at low speeds compared to using B mode and the brake at low speeds. I find B mode is far smoother if you're not a lead footed oaf.
 

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2020 BMW i3S 120Ah BEV
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Ok thanks. I'm ok with the i3 stopping the car actually. The i3S has different throttle response modes (from very very slow, through "middling but heavily damped", to razor sharp, insanely quick) but afaik none of them make any changes to regen settings.
 

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the e-pedal is an option in the Leaf, you have a separate switch and also can set it up to be the default mode at starting.
To be pedantic, you can set it up so that the car remembers whether or not you were in e-pedal mode when you turned the car off, and it will start up in that same mode, i.e. if you turn the car off while it's in e-pedal mode then it will start up in e-pedal mode, but if e-pedal mode is off when you turn the car off then it will start up with e-pedal mode off. You can't set it so that it will always start in e-pedal mode regardless.
 

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Yes the brake lights come on in the i3 when you take your foot off the pedal and it's in full regen braking.
OK, when you REMOVE your foot. But why would you remove your foot unless you want to stop? I mean, at least with the Leaf, you still need to apply some pressure, even downhill, unless you want to stop completely, and in that case it is good (and pretty normal) that the break lights turn on. Driving with e-pedal is different from driving with manual shifting ICE. In fact, with my 330e PHEV downhill, the motor (or the engine) goes into coasting mode and the electric motor acts as a generator to charge the high voltage battery. I can of course, if I have cruise control on, remove my foot from the pedal, without any break lights, and the break lights doesn't come on when the motor is coasted in downhill driving. With the active crusing control on, the speed is kept, but the break lights come on ONLY if I approach another car or some other obstacle and the speed must be reduced more dramatically. Approaching another car from behind which is driving a bit slower than I do means a small change in speed and it does not turn on the break lights, though results in a small regeneration. This is the way even the Leaf is working. I have never driven an i3, but see several every day, and from what I can see, they behave similarly.
And cruise control isn't as easy to set as it should be in the circumstances either, nor as reliable.
Again, I don't know the i3, but in my experience, both the Leaf and the BMW 330e has very reliable cruise controls, but all cars are different. We have fully adapted type with stop/start in both cars and I like to use that feature and in my experience EXTREMELY accurate in both cars. Perhaps in my BMW it is a bit aggressive, it slows down a bit later than I'd do when I have full control, but it means only that it applies a harder break pressure to slow down, the distance to the obstacle in front of me is the same when the car stops as it would be if I was driving. I like it that way, and probably the behaviour would change if I change the Driving Style setting to Comfort from Sport, as I have it now. My wife gets spooked when I use it, but on the other hand, the Leaf is softer and that's what she is used to. When I drive her Leaf I never get a cramped right foot, but to be honest, I mostly use her car on very short trips, like this afternoon, I took her car to a car wash in my village, drove about 12 km with the e-pedal, traffic lights, crossings and so on, but no problems. Perhaps we are different, e-pedal may not be for everyone's favour.
Can anyone explain what's the difference between "B" mode and "e-pedal"? I have an i3, it has no controls..
The B mode is something I never really understood. I mean, it says to give more regeneration then non-B, but why not always have the B? Perhaps that is what you have in the i3. B is a weird thing only exists in Nissan. Maybe it is similar to one of your ECO PRO or ECO PRO+ modes.
 
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