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Discussion Starter #1
Morning all,

Just doing some future planning, as I do, and have been thinking about the Model 3 Standard Range Plus as the successor to my i3 REx. In theory, its got long enough range for me to go fully BEV (as it would sit beside my existing i3 BEV), is quite a lot quicker, has more tech and more space.

However, I'd like to focus on the performance aspect as having looked at the figures on paper, there's more to it. Whilst the i3 REx is quoted as 0-60 in 7.6s, Parkers, the Model 3 is quoted as 5.6s, also Parkers. But when I look at the power to weight ratio, the i3 sits at 127bhp/tonne and the Model 3 is 130 - you'd think an indeterminate difference, so why are the 0-60 times so different? I can only assume it's down to the 'off-the-line' ability of the Tesla. The i3 is known to have a bit of lag straight off the line, only picking up 20mph (or so) +, whereas I should imagine, like the Model S & X the Tesla probably launches hard.

My question is, has anyone driven both or even own both, and what's the difference?

In conclusion, if there is little difference I may not change the i3 as performance is a big factor for me and I do love how I can nip between traffic in the i3, a compromise with the Model 3 that, with little performance difference, would not be worth it IMO. I'll wait until the Performance becomes affordable.
 

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Getting actual numbers is a bit difficult since Tesla doesn't really advertise it properly. But the SR+ Dynos's at around 270-275HP. Apparently the Model 3 is 1611kg (DIN). That puts the P:W ratio at around about 170HP/Tonne and the Torque:Weight ratio at 242Nm/Tonne.

That's around about the same as a Focus ST (0-62 6.3s) or BMW 330i (0-60 5.9s).

Tesla advertises the Model 3 0-62 time in Canada as 5.6s, I'd be a little weary of that since the US tends to favour '1 foot roll-out' times so my guess would be somewhere in the region of the mid-to-high 5 seconds. Especially given the manufacturer tyre pressure's are quite high and our roads are quite cold and most of the time. But you do have the advantage of the EV torque.

Similarly for the BMW- 170HP over 1315kg gives 129HP/tonne or similar to a Fiat 124 (0-62 7.5s), Jag XE (0-62 7.6s). So around about 7.5-8.0s is reasonable.

If anything, their power to weight ratio is about consistent with what you'd expect give or take half a second either side as is to be expected.

In terms of straight line performance the Model 3 SR+ should slot in neatly between a BMW 330i and an Alfa Giulia Veloce.

What you have to consider is also that the i3 has noticeable torque drop off at around 40MPH and more so at 70mph plus. I've not driven a Model 3 but have the 3-Series and Alfa, so if we assume that the Tesla is similar in performance there is definitely a noticeable performance increase.

Not quite off the line because you'll probably end up much more traction limited than you are in the i3 but when you're already going the torque drop-off of the i3 is noticeable but in these higher powered cars you still get some of that 'push-back' feeling at least still in the mid-range.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Getting actual numbers is a bit difficult since Tesla doesn't really advertise it properly. But the SR+ Dynos's at around 270-275HP. Apparently the Model 3 is 1611kg (DIN). That puts the P:W ratio at around about 170HP/Tonne and the Torque:Weight ratio at 242Nm/Tonne.

That's around about the same as a Focus ST (0-62 6.3s) or BMW 330i (0-60 5.9s).

Tesla advertises the Model 3 0-62 time in Canada as 5.6s, I'd be a little weary of that since the US tends to favour '1 foot roll-out' times so my guess would be somewhere in the region of the mid-to-high 5 seconds. Especially given the manufacturer tyre pressure's are quite high and our roads are quite cold and most of the time. But you do have the advantage of the EV torque.

Similarly for the BMW- 170HP over 1315kg gives 129HP/tonne or similar to a Fiat 124 (0-62 7.5s), Jag XE (0-62 7.6s). So around about 7.5-8.0s is reasonable.

If anything, their power to weight ratio is about consistent with what you'd expect give or take half a second either side as is to be expected.

In terms of straight line performance the Model 3 SR+ should slot in neatly between a BMW 330i and an Alfa Giulia Veloce.

What you have to consider is also that the i3 has noticeable torque drop off at around 40MPH and more so at 70mph plus. I've not driven a Model 3 but have the 3-Series and Alfa, so if we assume that the Tesla is similar in performance there is definitely a noticeable performance increase.

Not quite off the line because you'll probably end up much more traction limited than you are in the i3 but when you're already going the torque drop-off of the i3 is noticeable but in these higher powered cars you still get some of that 'push-back' feeling at least still in the mid-range.
A comprehensive and informative reply, many thanks!

Interesting that Tesla should feel the need to under-quote their power figures. But given the performance you have suggested above in respect of the dyno figures, that is more in line with what I would consider worthy of an upgrade from the i3.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Not having driven the i3 I can't help here but it would be interesting if you could update us how long in seconds it took you to be convinced in a M3 testdrive - my bet's on less than 10.
A bold bet, but one which I don't think unreasonable. I have considered WeVee who offer a 7 day test drive but it's £699 which I'm not sure I can justify...
 

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Being EVs it is less about the maximum power output of the motor but how the software decides to deliver the power.
In my Leaf it was really obvious that maximum power output was being held back for a few seconds. I think this was partly to protect the mechanics and also minimise torque steer (there was still a lot).
I also think the legacy automakers do not want their EVs beating their high end ICE cars.

Whereas Tesla does not care.
 

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Coincidentally in my inbox today...
You’re invited to test drive Model 3 at an event at Farnham Hall, Hertfordshire.​
Test drive to experience our award-winning Model 3 — with a 5-star Euro NCAP safety rating, and one of the longest driving ranges of any electric vehicle, up to 348 miles (WLTP). During the event, Tesla Product Experts will be available to answer any questions you may have.​
Space is limited. Please RSVP to confirm your attendance.​
 

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I didn't think Tesla were offering test drives on Model 3s yet, the website only states booking/scheduling for Model S & X..
M3 Test drives can be booked via the a Tesla website.
Ours is booked a week on Saturday.
Took a couple of weeks for the email reply to arrive saying slots were available.

In a similar position. Replacing the wife’s i3S Rex....potentially. We’ll see.
 

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Getting actual numbers is a bit difficult since Tesla doesn't really advertise it properly. But the SR+ Dynos's at around 270-275HP. Apparently the Model 3 is 1611kg (DIN). That puts the P:W ratio at around about 170HP/Tonne and the Torque:Weight ratio at 242Nm/Tonne.

Similarly for the BMW- 170HP over 1315kg gives 129HP/tonne or similar to a Fiat 124 (0-62 7.5s), Jag XE (0-62 7.6s). So around about 7.5-8.0s is reasonable.
You should really use the pre-dyno figures for the tesla, if you’re going to use them for the i3?

That Tesla output is ‘at the wheels’ whereas the i3 is ‘at the motor’ and takes no account of any losses, which admittedly should be lower than a car with a traditional transmission, but they‘ll still be there.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
You should really use the pre-dyno figures for the tesla, if you’re going to use them for the i3?

That Tesla output is ‘at the wheels’ whereas the i3 is ‘at the motor’ and takes no account of any losses, which admittedly should be lower than a car with a traditional transmission, but they‘ll still be there.
To be fair, whilst I wasn't aware of any Model 3 dyno figures, I had read previously the i3 (non-S) produced around 180bhp, a little more than quoted, but still more or less in line with scarysharks comments.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
M3 Test drives can be booked via the a Tesla website.
Ours is booked a week on Saturday.
Took a couple of weeks for the email reply to arrive saying slots were available.

In a similar position. Replacing the wife’s i3S Rex....potentially. We’ll see.
I'll be interested to hear about it if you get a chance to update us!
 

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My first post as I've been reading threads for a while mainly the Evezy related before I decided to g straight for a Tesla SR+ after owning an i3 for a year.

Easiest way to describe the difference is the i3 is a very efficient but sporty town car with slightly soft suspension and a quite aggressive traction control. I could usually put a few car lengths on most cars at traffic lights but traction was a bit iffy in anything less than dry roads. So after wearing a rear set of tyres in a few thousand miles I decided to move up to the Tesla. During some of my digging on the i3, as I like stats. I read that the i3 motor or battery not sure which is rated to 125Kw only for a limited time and then it reduces to 85kw continuous which may explain why it's quick off the line and then after 70mph rapidly tails off if correct.

The Tesla is simply a much better handling car with more grip and a better suspension setup that is very chuck able in corners. Match that to a drive train that has a continuous power delivery right into the triple figure range. Though generally less efficient it doesn't loose efficiency like an i3 does once above 60mph which was my own personal limit driving the i3 60ah version to get near the 80 mile average. I believe the later cars have batter battery tech but the Tesla simply cruises at 70mph without the compromises of the i3.

So the Tesla has better handling and is noticeable quicker to higher speeds and doesn't suffer the efficiency loss at motorway speeds compared to the i3. The weight distribution and lower centre of gravity make it a true performance car with lots of grip from the 235 tyres all round and that's only the SR+!!

The i3 is great in urban environments but is ultimately limited by the tyres as it has good brakes that can overwhelm the tyres in sudden application. The sound system in the i3 with the HK upgrade is probably better with more subtle bass but they are close.

Oh and I still miss the very configurable charge scheduling and pre-heating of the i3. Much superior to the Tesla Model 3 which has only just got a simpler departure time setting with pre-heat but only settable for weekdays or weekends.
 
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