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My old mower had died so I need a new one. It seems everyone is trying to tie you in to their battery system. (mower/drill/hedge trimmer etc.) I feel a mug for taking the plunge. Is it worth it? Was looking at 'green works' : the battery and charger are an extra £110! I have a bosch drill with batteries but they don't seem transferable.
 

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My old mower had died so I need a new one. It seems everyone is trying to tie you in to their battery system. (mower/drill/hedge trimmer etc.) I feel a mug for taking the plunge. Is it worth it? Was looking at 'green works' : the battery and charger are an extra £110! I have a bosch drill with batteries but they don't seem transferable.
All the tools I have are Makita so that was my choice (that means I didn't have to purchace the batteries and charger as I already use them every day). My worry and another reason I went Makita is the long period of time the batteries will sit in the shed slowly discharging in the freezing cold.

The mower is a 2x18v and the strimmer is 18v they both work really well but won't tackle really long grass, they are definatly garden tools and not wilderness ones.
 

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I am sticking with Ryobi for now, sold off my other cordless drills etc, just bought the chainsaw to cut some branches down, its so light I can use it one handed.
 

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I've got cordless Ryobi everything, but my mower is a Mountfield, I forget the model name.

It's a 48v model, and came with 2 x 4Ah batteries so plenty of cutting time.

Screwfix sell them.
 

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Much as we all love portable batteries (right?), it is completely pointless unless you truly need portability. If you have such a lawn that you cannot cut it with an extension cable and electric mower then sure go for it. If you can use a lead, stay wired. This is not so much for cost, necessarily, but if you use the mower once every few weeks and then barely over winter, the batteries will die and it is a huge waste of resources.

Batteries where you need portability, but you also have to use them or they will die a death.
 

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Much as we all love portable batteries (right?), it is completely pointless unless you truly need portability. If you have such a lawn that you cannot cut it with an extension cable and electric mower then sure go for it. If you can use a lead, stay wired. This is not so much for cost, necessarily, but if you use the mower once every few weeks and then barely over winter, the batteries will die and it is a huge waste of resources.

Batteries where you need portability, but you also have to use them or they will die a death.
That's why I like the Ryobi stuff as I use the same batteries on my grinder/impact driver/reciprocating saw/drill etc leaving batteries for long periods kills them.
 

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Much as we all love portable batteries (right?), it is completely pointless unless you truly need portability. If you have such a lawn that you cannot cut it with an extension cable and electric mower then sure go for it. If you can use a lead, stay wired. This is not so much for cost, necessarily, but if you use the mower once every few weeks and then barely over winter, the batteries will die and it is a huge waste of resources.

Batteries where you need portability, but you also have to use them or they will die a death.
I don't think that's true with lithiums, I have a cordless drill/driver, probably 9 orb10 years old now, still works fine!
 

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Mine hasn't quite died but is very old and I seem to have to do more each year to get it working in the spring so I to am looking at cordless stuff for the garden. I looked at the EGO stuff and was quite keen but it is very expensive so am now considering the Greenworks 80v range as this is cheaper and the multi tool uses Ryobi expand-it attachments which can be bought cheap on ebay.

Re the battery life, I was a bit concerned as I have has drill batteries go south between projects but I seem to only get a month or so off mowing the lawn now we have mild winters year in year out and when not mowing the battery will be used for a leaf blower, hedge trimmer etc so should get almost year round use with only a month or so of rest. Also I understand these outdoor cordless equipment now cut off rather than fade suggesting they have better battery management than they used to, ie. they get to 10-20% capacity and cut power so you cant finish the lawn and then leave them completely depleted. I might be wrong but that is what I thought when the cut out was described in a youtube review I watched. edit oh dear, I have just admitted to watching lawnmower reviews on you tube !
 

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It's even more true for LiIon, you must have a very good make/be lucky. How often do you use it?
It's another Bosch item, so in my mind good but not top end. I'd say I use it once every few weeks, just for putting up pictures or flatpack furniture etc. Run it until it's empty and then put it in its dock to charge, might stay at 100% for weeks or months.
My father had nickel (cadmium I think) ones and they were terrible. Flat every time you went to use them and dead within a couple of years.
 

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I put mine (along with any number of my approx 50 remote control aircraft Lipos!) into a storage charge mode (50-60%) if I know I won't be using them for a good while.

That said, I'm not at all careful with most of my tool batteries, and I haven't noticed any degradation or failures with them.
 

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It's another Bosch item, so in my mind good but not top end. I'd say I use it once every few weeks, just for putting up pictures or flatpack furniture etc. Run it until it's empty and then put it in its dock to charge, might stay at 100% for weeks or months.
My father had nickel (cadmium I think) ones and they were terrible. Flat every time you went to use them and dead within a couple of years.
I don't think it correlates with chemistry, but internal construction. Thick separators, and all that.

I actually have a set of NiCd C-cells dated back to 1988. They still work. No idea if they have the same capacity, they barely had much when they were new! ;)
 

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I bought a Bosch Rotak 34Li in an Amazon deal in 2012 for £232 - worked great ever since. I have a typical suburban semi-detached house and garden (front and back). One charge will easily do the whole back garden even when over grown a bit, charging is quite fast but it's very rare I will need it twice in a day.

I think the replacement model is typically about £400 (with battery etc.) but Amazon seem to have occassional offers and I am sure others do too.

It's a lot of money but it so much easier just to walk to the shed with a battery and get the mower out and use it, no faff with extension cables etc. and the added reassurance of no cable to cut through.
 

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i second this i really love using this mower
Thirded. Takes me an hour to mow the lawn and it copes easily. And I also bought the 'naked' (without battery) chainsaw, hedge trimmer and leaf blower ... so my battery fits them all. Would never go back to noisy and stinky petrol ...
 

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Thirded. Takes me an hour to mow the lawn and it copes easily. And I also bought the 'naked' (without battery) chainsaw, hedge trimmer and leaf blower ... so my battery fits them all. Would never go back to noisy and stinky petrol ...
naked hedge trimmer and strimmer are on my christmas list :D
 

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Are any of these self-propelled?
The Bosch lawnmower isn't self-propelled. That said, my lawn slopes significantly and my previous petrol Honda was SP. But the new mower is so much lighter that pushing it is no problem. In fact, it is less hard work than manhandling the heavy petrol mower around. I think of it as a work-out! :D
 
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