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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Ok, here it is, the real low-down from my perspective. I happen to have both these cars in my possession at the mo', so thought it would be interesting to try & do a direct comparison. My goal is to do a 160 mile trip in all weathers non-stop, starting at 100% SOC, and arriving with let's say 10 miles range or more.
As it happened I ran the Ioniq down to 3% SOC last night, so that's about 12-13 miles range remaining. While the car was warning me lots, it didn't go into turtle mode, which was nice of it!

I did 5 identical trips yesterday, 2 ID.3, 3 Ioniq. There was a thin band of rain forecast to sit right on top of me + chosen section of M3, so I really wanted to test both cars in this same belt of rain at an identical 70 MPH. But the band passed faster than I wanted (!), so the Ioniq got 1 trip with medium rain 100% of the time, the ID.3 followed immed after with very heavy spray but no rain as such. Then immed after, another Ioniq trip on wet-but-less-so roads did a v similar performance to the worst-case, so I think what matters is the fact that the road is wet, more than the actual droplets of rain themselves.

The test trip is my home (edge of Winchester) to motorway, traffic lights at bottom of slip-lane access, up to Basingstoke, exit & return, lights again at bottom of clip lane exit, home. Home section is edge-of-city 40/60 stuff with one roundabout in, traffic generally light. Distance is 44.4 miles acc to google. Interestingly both cars reported 44 miles as the trip dist covered always, though one was actually 45 when I used the total-distance Odometer for my calcs.

The ID.3 is brand new Life 58 kWh + Heat Pump + Alloys, tyre pressures whatever the dealer's set, not yet measured though. Ioniq has done 5k miles, tyres pumped to 36 psi cold. Speed was set using standalone Satnav to calibrate on-the-fly. ID.3 needed ACC set to 72 MPH to get genuine 70, Ioniq needed 74 setting for same actual speed.

The first trip I screwed up the Ioniq settings. Carefully set it to 22C, A/C on, whole-car to be controlled, vents set to screen, body & legs, fan speed slow, trying to match what the ID.3 would be set to. I forgot to turn Heating On ! So I set out, and was wondering why my hands were a bit chilly! Realised after a mile what I'd done, but carried on anyway as it's all useful info. Car was at 100% SOC before I left, having had morning topup from 90% prev day to final 10% just before departing. No preconditioning done. ID.3 got similar treatment; was at 60% SOC overnight, charged it up to 85% while out in Ioniq, then decided I couldn't wait for a 100% fill as needed to get the wettest road I could.

Here's a screenshot of my spreadsheet.
138623


Conclusions?
1) Hyundai gets 10% more M/kWh than ID.3 does in these wet conditions at 70 MPH.

2) Hyundai has MAX RANGE 130 Miles in these conditions, so 120+SafetyMargin in my book.

3) ID.3+HeatPump has MAX RANGE 175 miles in these conditions, so 165+SafetyMargin in my book.

4) Journey times vary. Partly delays at traffic lights, partly held up at times by traffic so forced to do 60 for a bit, then overspeeding up to 75 after to try & compensate, so hard to achieve a consistent drive tbh. Both cars used the traffic-following Auto Cruise Control. Hyundai holds speed v steady, ID.3 happy to vary between 71 & 73 when actually set to 72.

5) Trip 1 gets high range for Ioniq. Road was virtually dry, and no heating! Interesting, but no use to compare with the remaing 4 trips.

6) Trip 2 & 4 get similar results for Ioniq, so I think the ID.3 trip3 in-between is a good comparison.

7) ID.2 trip3 and trip5 are v similar, despite road drying a bit. I see I did trip 5 a bit faster, so maybe I drove a bit faster in places hence slightly lower MAX RANGE predicted.

8) More testing needed to see if tricks like turning off A/C but keeping heat on in Ioniq can improve towards the 160 mile range predicted for trip1. Maybe try no heat but use heated steering wheel. Etc.
 

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Very interesting - that 10% difference in efficiency is a testament to Hyundai in what is not a purpose designed EV.

But from your perspective the key is the battery size - 38kWh on the Ioniq vs 58kWh on the ID.3. To paraphrase the old American saying, "The ain't no substitute for kWh".

Which car do you prefer driving? I am struggling to make a case for the Ioniq based on your goal of
to do a 160 mile trip in all weathers non-stop, starting at 100% SOC, and arriving with let's say 10 miles range or more.
as in the not particularly cold but damp you'll have to cut your speed significantly to make it, and in very poor weather likely have to "splash and dash" near the end to make the journey.
 

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I love nerdy tests like this! 👍

I expect slightly higher air temperature, lower humidity(?), higher pressure(?) and hence probably lower air density also had at least a little bit to do with the impressive result for the Ioniq in run 1.
 

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This is an interesting comparison & definitely a good job on levelling the dataset between the cars as much as possible.

I wouldn't say this is quite an apples to oranges comparison, more of a Granny Smith to Cox's comparison - They're both apples, but with enough significant differences that the results become more subjective than objective. As @dk6780 says, which do you prefer to drive etc?

I'd really like to see a detailed comparison like this done between two of the same car with slightly different specs. For example, a Life with a heat pump vs a 1st without one.

My son & I are both getting new ID.3s next week. His is a standard spec Life, mine a 1st. So the only real difference between them is the alloy wheels and the slight difference in kerb weight (the Life is 10kg heavier according to the specs). I may try to do a similar comparison with him where we both do the same trip together at the same time, if he can be bothered :)
 

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I love nerdy tests like this! 👍

I expect slightly higher air temperature, lower humidity(?), higher pressure(?) and hence probably lower air density also had at least a little bit to do with the impressive result for the Ioniq in run 1.
Its a common misconception about humidity and air density - dry air is actually more dense than humid air ! - see here
 

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I'd really like to see a detailed comparison like this done between two of the same car with slightly different specs. For example, a Life with a heat pump vs a 1st without one.
Your lucky day!
 

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the Life is 10kg heavier according to the specs
I find that hard to believe. Is this like Ladies underwear - the more you pay the less you get?
 

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In my experience with the Ioniq, I get about 160 miles in these conditions (well actually it is my wife driving - she is brilliant at this), but this is without Cruise Control. Switch this off and see what you get. I find that Cruise Control seems to use a lot more kw than your foot. I know that this is harder to get a consistent comparison, but we have had 170+ miles in the wet winter on motorways with speeds 65-70mph.
 

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we have had 170+ miles in the wet winter on motorways with speeds 65-70mph
That "small" difference in speed from @HandyAndy 's indicated 74 would make a huge difference.
 

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That "small" difference in speed from @HandyAndy 's indicated 74 would make a huge difference.
Yes, probably right. We are aiming for 70, but with conditions on the M62, it drops in places and then you have to take into account the satellite adjusted speed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ok guys, I've crunched the numbers for how much Grid electricity was required for the Ioniq & ID.3 tests above.
Ioniq finished the tests on 3% SOC, but this fell to 2% SOC by the following morning when I refilled. I did have to switch cars on the drive, so that will have used a few more Coulombs, but I'll work on 2% figure.

Ioniq drew 43.6 kWh from Grid to fill 98% SOC. This works out to 44.49 kWh for 100% SOC refill. 38.4 kWh is usable.
So Ioniq Charging Efficiency on 7 kW EVSE = (38.4/44.5) * 100 = 86% Efficient.
Or, your electricity bill will be about 16% more than your Ioniq's usable range might suggest.

ID.3 drew 34.8 kWh from Grid to fill from 32% to 86% SOC. This works out to 64.44 kWh for 100% SOC refill. 58.4 usable.
So ID.3 Charging Efficiency on 7 kW EVSE = (58.4/64.44) * 100 = 90% Efficient.
Or, your electricity bill will be about 11% more than your ID.3's usable range might suggest.
 

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I've found wind a killer factor at this time of year, often 40mph winds at this time of year, now on a same day round trip it will even out, But earlier in the year I tried a 140 mile journey (returning the next day) in mostly quite heavy rain into 40mph winds. I think the car would just have made it (with dropping speed down to 60ish) but I still took a precautionary charge on route.
 

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I've found wind a killer factor at this time of year, often 40mph winds at this time of year, now on a same day round trip it will even out, But earlier in the year I tried a 140 mile journey (returning the next day) in mostly quite heavy rain into 40mph winds. I think the car would just have made it (with dropping speed down to 60ish) but I still took a precautionary charge on route.
That's when it's time to find a MegaBus..
 

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Ok guys, I've crunched the numbers for how much Grid electricity was required for the Ioniq & ID.3 tests above.
Ioniq finished the tests on 3% SOC, but this fell to 2% SOC by the following morning when I refilled. I did have to switch cars on the drive, so that will have used a few more Coulombs, but I'll work on 2% figure.

Ioniq drew 43.6 kWh from Grid to fill 98% SOC. This works out to 44.49 kWh for 100% SOC refill. 38.4 kWh is usable.
So Ioniq Charging Efficiency on 7 kW EVSE = (38.4/44.5) * 100 = 86% Efficient.
Or, your electricity bill will be about 16% more than your Ioniq's usable range might suggest.

ID.3 drew 34.8 kWh from Grid to fill from 32% to 86% SOC. This works out to 64.44 kWh for 100% SOC refill. 58.4 usable.
So ID.3 Charging Efficiency on 7 kW EVSE = (58.4/64.44) * 100 = 90% Efficient.
Or, your electricity bill will be about 11% more than your ID.3's usable range might suggest.
Interesting. So that reduces the efficiency gain of the Ioniq to around 5% overall.
Still impressive.
 
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