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Discussion Starter #1
Not a car expert at all. Is the fact that it will be RWD an issue? Never owned a RWD and worried about stability etc... Can someone set me right please?
 

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No issue at all.

Don’t drive it like a loon into the bends and you will never know it’s RWD, find a nice wide open car park when you get a bit of snow and push the car a bit to learn how to control a drift at low speed.
 

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All F1 racing cars are RWD. Front wheel drive came about because they are cheaper. BMW kept with RWD. RWD cars can have a tighter turning circle.
 

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Just drive it normally and you'd hardly notice. The two EVs I've owned both RWD have had exceptional traction and stability control as there's so much less mass in the drive-train to control. The electric motor works with the brakes unlike an ICE. You really have to chunk one into a corner or deliberately drive beyond the traction to upset them.

If anything I've seen FWD EVs with less finesse as they can spin the front wheels more easily.
 

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Electric motors have finer control, so as long as the ESP is designed correctly, there shouldn’t be a problem.

EVs tends to have a 50/50 weight distribution, making them less sensitive to where the power is put down.

Certainly on the Tesla it wasn’t an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
No issue at all.

Don’t drive it like a loon into the bends and you will never know it’s RWD, find a nice wide open car park when you get a bit of snow and push the car a bit to learn how to control a drift at low speed.
All F1 racing cars are RWD. Front wheel drive came about because they are cheaper. BMW kept with RWD. RWD cars can have a tighter turning circle.
Just drive it normally and you'd hardly notice. The two EVs I've owned both RWD have had exceptional traction and stability control as there's so much less mass in the drive-train to control. The electric motor works with the brakes unlike an ICE. You really have to chunk one into a corner or deliberately drive beyond the traction to upset them.

If anything I've seen FWD EVs with less finesse as they can spin the front wheels more easily.
Thanks everyone for your replies.
I just wasn't sure really, so I can carry on looking with one concern ticked off.
Much appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Electric motors have muccontrol, so as long as the ESP is designed correctly, there shouldn’t be a problem.

EVs tends to have a 50/50 weight distribution, making them less sensitive to where the power is put down.

Certainly on the Tesla it wasn’t an issue.
Makes sense. Many thanks
 

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Kia Soul EV 2020
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Why don't you go and test drive a rwd car? EV if possible...

And Corona safe, if possible...
 
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Front wheel drive is an aberration brought about by the desire to improve packaging in cars by eliminating the transmission tunnel and have the engine mounted transversely. It is not inherently safer than RWD, and is more prone to "lift off oversteer", particularly when the car has significant cargo in the back.
Everyone should learn how to control their cars outside of normal limits, because you can reach them in poor weather. If you get the opportunity take a decent course on a skid pan and learn how to react in different circumstances, some of it you may find counter intuitive.
 

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Not a car expert at all. Is the fact that it will be RWD an issue? Never owned a RWD and worried about stability etc... Can someone set me right please?
Better under acceleration, so long as it isn't hard acceleration in a corner.

Lower maximum regen than if it were a FWD, but the computers will take care of that.
 

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Lower maximum regen than if it were a FWD, but the computers will take care of that.
In theory, but in reality even the most powerful regeneration used on road cars is well under the traction limits of the rear tyres.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Just a question of hoping it will be possible to test some one day and buy one. It must be very tough for all in the industry...
 

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Everyone should have a couple of hours on a track before they get their licence. 2 hours doing 100mph round corners learning how cars grip and what they (and you) can and can't do is hugely informative. I did it on a motorbike about 20 years ago after riding for many years. I wished I'd done it at the beginning.
 

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Not a car expert at all. Is the fact that it will be RWD an issue? Never owned a RWD and worried about stability etc... Can someone set me right please?
Late to the party but... RWD is better than fine. I drove an old RWD BMW 3 series here in Norway for years and with good winter tyres (the biggest factor for traction in winter) it was not a problem. Handling is generally better with RWD with no torque steer to contend with and although RW slide is more likely to occur in RWD ICE cars if you take corners too fast, those slides are much easier to straighten than a FWD slide.

With a BEV you have the added advantage of low, centrally distributed weight (so more weight over drive wheels than with a FWD ICE car), and better traction control than an ICE car.
 

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IMO front wheel drives were made mostly because of the ease of fitting the running gear into the wave of smaller cars that were designed in the 50-60's, but also there was a lot of talk of them being more 'idiot-proof' to drive, which in a sense it is but Im not a fan of not teaching people how to recognise and deal with adverse driving conditions (i.e high speed and/or skid pan training before licence issue).
 
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