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2020 BMW i3S 120Ah BEV
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I had a similar thought for a moment or two before getting the i3S having driven FWD all my life, but in practice it's really no issue. As others have said the traction control is miraculously effective, and even if you switch it off you'll find it's just as easy to control as FWD once you've experimented on a few quiet roundabouts...
I'm sure you've driven go-karts anyway, they're all RWD too.
 

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And with the big slugs of torque you get with an EV, rear drive should help the front wheels to get on with just steering the car.
Hoping the ID3 will be an enjoyable thing to drive like the i3 and mini are :)
 

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VW haven't managed to do that for a long time. I think probably since the Mk3 came out...
Cant agree with that. They (VW) did lose their way when it came to making cars that were enjoyable to drive but definitely turned it around with the MQB platform.
We have a 2015 Seat leon and it's great fun. Ok, the torsion beam rear end is a bit short on playfulness compared with a good multi link set up and the steering is a little numb, but it's still a hoot to hustle down the local B roads.

Will be truly surprised if most cars on the MEB platform are not a giggle to drive ;)
 

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Saw a UK reg BMW 1 series, RWD, in the Alps a few years ago with snow chains on the front tyres!!
 
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Learned to drive in RWD cars only changed to FWD due to manufactures design and packaging
RWD always felt better but I get the concern from anyone not having driven anything other than FWD
Btw all trucks and a lot of vans are RWD and they have no issues on the road with modern restrictions and tech onboard
 

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Cant agree with that. They (VW) did lose their way when it came to making cars that were enjoyable to drive but definitely turned it around with the MQB platform.
We have a 2015 Seat leon and it's great fun. Ok, the torsion beam rear end is a bit short on playfulness compared with a good multi link set up and the steering is a little numb, but it's still a hoot to hustle down the local B roads.
Ironically the best car to drive I have is the Corrado which has a torsion beam rear suspension setup and the most boring is the MQB golf, with multi-link rear suspension.. :)
It's exactly that - numb steering - that totally kills it. The old hydraulic assist racks had a fluidity and feedback that none of the electric assisted cars can come close to thus far. Coupled with the instant throttle response of a large naturally aspirated V6 it is way more fun to drive than the turbo four pot MQB cars I've driven (even if ultimate handling grip level is not quite as high as the newer cars).
 

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It is indeed a shame that hydraulic steering is all but consigned to history now. I had a Focus for 8 years before the Leon and the difference in steering feel is still obvious every time I drive it.
Think Mclaren are the only manufacturer still fitting fluid racks, and I can't afford one of them :cry:

Having said that, the Leon feels bloody great after I drive wifies leaf, it's the very embodiment of a slow witted numb electric tiller, absolutely horrible IMO :mad:
 

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Kona 64
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I have nothing against RWD, I owned a VW Karmann Ghia, and had a go on a skid pan with it! I am still alive to tell the tale. I currently have a Kona EV so FWD. The regen works on the front wheels thus considerably reducing wear on the front discs, pads and tyres, as long as I am careful not to spin the front wheels.

My question is, the regen on this RWD can only be on the rear driven axle. To get balanced braking then surely the trusty old pads & discs on the front have a lot more work to do? I know that modern traction control will make braking safer than my Karmann Ghia but will the front brakes wear out just as quickly as on an ICE? Also the rear brakes which have an easy life anyway now have even less to do? I guess this issue is also relevant to the i3. The Front pads & discs on my Kona look to be good for 100,000 miles. What will the wear be like on this VW? I note Skoda plan a 4WD version of the ID4 which is the best solution if you have deep enough pockets.
 

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I have nothing against RWD, I owned a VW Karmann Ghia, and had a go on a skid pan with it! I am still alive to tell the tale. I currently have a Kona EV so FWD. The regen works on the front wheels thus considerably reducing wear on the front discs, pads and tyres, as long as I am careful not to spin the front wheels.

My question is, the regen on this RWD can only be on the rear driven axle. To get balanced braking then surely the trusty old pads & discs on the front have a lot more work to do? I know that modern traction control will make braking safer than my Karmann Ghia but will the front brakes wear out just as quickly as on an ICE? Also the rear brakes which have an easy life anyway now have even less to do? I guess this issue is also relevant to the i3. The Front pads & discs on my Kona look to be good for 100,000 miles. What will the wear be like on this VW? I note Skoda plan a 4WD version of the ID4 which is the best solution if you have deep enough pockets.
Well normal brakes are always used at slow speeds
 

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I have nothing against RWD, I owned a VW Karmann Ghia, and had a go on a skid pan with it! I am still alive to tell the tale. I currently have a Kona EV so FWD. The regen works on the front wheels thus considerably reducing wear on the front discs, pads and tyres, as long as I am careful not to spin the front wheels.

My question is, the regen on this RWD can only be on the rear driven axle. To get balanced braking then surely the trusty old pads & discs on the front have a lot more work to do? I know that modern traction control will make braking safer than my Karmann Ghia but will the front brakes wear out just as quickly as on an ICE? Also the rear brakes which have an easy life anyway now have even less to do? I guess this issue is also relevant to the i3. The Front pads & discs on my Kona look to be good for 100,000 miles. What will the wear be like on this VW? I note Skoda plan a 4WD version of the ID4 which is the best solution if you have deep enough pockets.
I think that you are over thinking this. :unsure:

Their is a significant amount of regen available from both FWD and RWD EVs, but it is at a limit (due to battery charging constraints) than is significantly below the levels of grip available on "normal" roads even at its highest settings. Anything above that is done by the friction brakes regardless of which axle is braked. In some ways it makes more sense to brake at the rear first as it stabilises the vehicle and then add additional braking to the front as ultimately "weight transfer" means that more can be done there. So the only issue remaining is for the manufacturers to size the brakes accordingly.
 

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I have nothing against RWD, I owned a VW Karmann Ghia, and had a go on a skid pan with it! I am still alive to tell the tale. I currently have a Kona EV so FWD. The regen works on the front wheels thus considerably reducing wear on the front discs, pads and tyres, as long as I am careful not to spin the front wheels.

My question is, the regen on this RWD can only be on the rear driven axle. To get balanced braking then surely the trusty old pads & discs on the front have a lot more work to do? I know that modern traction control will make braking safer than my Karmann Ghia but will the front brakes wear out just as quickly as on an ICE? Also the rear brakes which have an easy life anyway now have even less to do? I guess this issue is also relevant to the i3. The Front pads & discs on my Kona look to be good for 100,000 miles. What will the wear be like on this VW? I note Skoda plan a 4WD version of the ID4 which is the best solution if you have deep enough pockets.
You don't need to brake the front if you are braking the rear.

However, you should aim to brake the rear if you are braking at the front.
 

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Kona 64
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You don't need to brake the front if you are braking the rear.

However, you should aim to brake the rear if you are braking at the front.
Therefore RWD is the way forward with EV’s? I see the new Nissan Araya is rear engined (or 4WD)). I recall on my push bike, rear brake first otherwise head over handlebars and I recall on my Lambretta front brake first to transfer weight. So car braking is more nuanced? Clearly any thinking time required is now taken over by the electronics which are faster to respond. I learned cadence braking on a skid pan 40 years ago but the car now also does that better than a human. Soon the driver will be redundant.
 

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As the weight distribution front to rear is nearly roughly 50 50 and the wheelbase has been extended there should be less tendency for the weight to come off the rear wheels and shift to the front when braking heavily so you should be able to apply a greater proportion of braking to the rear without problems, which asks the question why fit drums on the rear when you can do nearly as much braking with them as the front with discs.
 

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Therefore RWD is the way forward with EV’s?
Not really. The regen power from RWD is less than FWD.

The optimum is 4WD, and given motors can be compact and there are efficiency gains for two motors whose most efficient operation is at different speeds, 4WD is the way to do. Of course, all depends on cost.
 

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Not really. The regen power from RWD is less than FWD.

The optimum is 4WD, and given motors can be compact and there are efficiency gains for two motors whose most efficient operation is at different speeds, 4WD is the way to do. Of course, all depends on cost.
I have started saving for a Skoda Enyaq or Nissan Ariya 4WD
 

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Not really. The regen power from RWD is less than FWD.

The optimum is 4WD, and given motors can be compact and there are efficiency gains for two motors whose most efficient operation is at different speeds, 4WD is the way to do. Of course, all depends on cost.
A lot of these new skate board platforms seem to be going the RWD route though. Honda e is another example.

Advantages with the turning circle and the simpler drive shaft setup probably out weigh FWD.
 

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My question is, the regen on this RWD can only be on the rear driven axle. To get balanced braking then surely the trusty old pads & discs on the front have a lot more work to do? I know that modern traction control will make braking safer than my Karmann Ghia but will the front brakes wear out just as quickly as on an ICE? Also the rear brakes which have an easy life anyway now have even less to do? I guess this issue is also relevant to the i3. The Front pads & discs on my Kona look to be good for 100,000 miles. What will the wear be like on this VW? I note Skoda plan a 4WD version of the ID4 which is the best solution if you have deep enough pockets.
Regarding your three questions:

No..

No, and..

Not detectably.

The friction brakes produce significantly more stopping power than regen to the extent that the differential wear caused by regen being applied to one or other axle is likely to be undetectable, BUT regen is sufficient to remove the need for 90+ percent of friction braking no matter which axle it acts upon, if the driver is sufficiently alert.
 

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Kona 64
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Regarding your three questions:

No..

No, and..

Not detectably.

The friction brakes produce significantly more stopping power than regen to the extent that the differential wear caused by regen being applied to one or other axle is likely to be undetectable, BUT regen is sufficient to remove the need for 90+ percent of friction braking no matter which axle it acts upon, if the driver is sufficiently alert.
Agree and I stay Alert. A lifetime of dealing with motor accidents and particularly staged whiplash claims makes me very suspicious of my fellow motorists.
 
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