Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner
1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had my ID3 for almost 3 weeks now. The advertised range is 260 yet when I have charged to 100% it only registered 235 miles of range and when I charge to 80% it only registers a max of 165 miles. Can anyone explain why this is or do you think I should take it back?
 

·
Registered
Hyundai Ioniq 38kwh
Joined
·
66 Posts
In the colder weather you should expect the range to be reduced a bit, it'll go back up when the weather is warmer :)
 

·
Registered
Hyundai Ioniq 38kW EV
Joined
·
145 Posts
Hello @Darren76. I am assuming that the advertised range refers to WLTP testing? Typically I would ignore the advertised figure as you would rarely every achieve this. Although this figure is far more “accurate” than the out of date testing it replaced, it still does not refer to what range you would get any normal driving conditions. The range you will get will depend on a host of factors:

  • Temperature
  • Speed
  • Weather conditions (wet / dry)
  • Wind
  • Use of heating / air conditioning
  • SOC

All these also affect the range of ICE but you do not notice the difference as much in ICE cars compared to EVs.

Typically you would get the best range in the warm summer months and less in the winter.

What you are reporting above is normal.
 

·
Registered
Hyundai Ioniq 38kW EV
Joined
·
145 Posts
Also.- forgot to mention that the drive range will also be based on the latest drive cycle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Most cars use previous driving style history to calculate the displayed range - if you drive carefully you will probably see the range go up over time
I didn’t account for that. I had just come off a long drive hitting the limit. Still testing the car. Thanks Mike
 

·
Premium Member
VW ID.3 1st Edition & Tesla M3 LR
Joined
·
8,370 Posts
I’ve only had mine 5 days and covered less than 200 miles, some of that ‘enthusiastic‘ driving, and mine is reporting 161 miles at 80% charged, which translates to just over 202 miles at full charge. That’s only 3.5 miles per kWh, I’d expect to get more than that on a more sustained run.

It‘s just an estimate based on current temp and recent driving style and energy consumption, and will bear little relation to what you could actually achieve range wise, unless you carry on driving in a similar fashion of course.
 

·
Premium Member
VW ID.3 1st Edition & Tesla M3 LR
Joined
·
8,370 Posts
On my regular 175 mile run, I was getting 3.6 to 4.1 miles per kWh depending on wind and rain in the e-Golf, that’s mostly A1 and keeping up with the traffic flow. Actual driving time was usually 3hrs 15min, but with charge stops (in bad weather I always did a quick 10 minute stop quite early on) it was over 4hrs.

I ran the tyres at 41 psi, seemed to make quite a difference versus 34.

It will be interesting to see how the ID.3 compares over the next few weeks.
 

·
Registered
Tesla Model 3 LR AWD, Renault ZOE R135 ZE50 GTLine (Sold: R90 ZE40 i Dynamic Nav)
Joined
·
948 Posts
I ran the tyres at 41 psi, seemed to make quite a difference versus 34.
That's quite a difference in tyre pressures. I did a skid pan course many years ago during which we ran the same car with high and low tyre pressures all round, and with high at the front / low at the back, and vice versa. The difference in handling and reduction in grip for high pressures on wet smooth tarmac was vast. High tyre pressures do reduce grip. The different front to rear configurations lead to understeer and oversteer respectively.

I've no problem with raising tyre pressure somewhat to increase efficiency, but I'd be tempted to try out a 24% increase on a skid pan before committing to it long term, especially with reducing tread depth.
 

·
Premium Member
VW ID.3 1st Edition & Tesla M3 LR
Joined
·
8,370 Posts
That's quite a difference in tyre pressures. I did a skid pan course many years ago during which we ran the same car with high and low tyre pressures all round, and with high at the front / low at the back, and vice versa. The difference in handling and reduction in grip for high pressures on wet smooth tarmac was vast. High tyre pressures do reduce grip. The different front to rear configurations lead to understeer and oversteer respectively.

I've no problem with raising tyre pressure somewhat to increase efficiency, but I'd be tempted to try out a 24% increase on a skid pan before committing to it long term, especially with reducing tread depth.
I don’t drive like I’m on a skid pan?! 🙂

It’s within the spec for the car, the door plate specifies it as an allowable pressure for the stock tyre size.

Of course, tyre pressures are just one variable for how a car handles, springs and dampers play a big part.

I never felt anything untoward in 28k in the e-Golf, perfectly predictable and planted in all road legal scenarios.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,193 Posts
FWIW Ampera say you can run theirs at anywhere between 32 & 40 psi. Mine had worn shoulders & under-worn central zone when I bought it, so I ran 40 from then on & never had any problems. But I can feel every stone I drive over, deffo a lot firmer & maybe fidgetier ride though. Tyres now wear much more evenly.
 

·
Registered
Tesla Model 3 LR AWD, Renault ZOE R135 ZE50 GTLine (Sold: R90 ZE40 i Dynamic Nav)
Joined
·
948 Posts
I ran the tyres at 41 psi, seemed to make quite a difference versus 34.
It’s within the spec for the car, the door plate specifies it as an allowable pressure for the stock tyre size.
I was responding to your comment that you were running at 41 instead of 34, as you stated. If the 41 is in spec then my misunderstanding.

Still, I'd recommend everyone to go on a skid pan course. It is really illuminating and helps understand car handling, especially in difficult situations, such as UK summer tyres on ice.
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top