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Discussion Starter #1
Visited this twice last week (out and back on holiday) didn't really need it for charge on the way back but wanted a coffee so charged whilst was there. One minute off the motorway.
8 chargers, all working, super simple process to charge no apps or rubbish like that. Tap card, plug in, done.
One large Costa with loos a minutes walk away where I sat for about 20 minutes and added 60 miles in that time. Which was about 50 more than I needed, I didn't look at the charge rate but it must Have been max for my eSoul. I should probably have started a charge, walked to costa and got a takeaway to save a fiver but wanted some time out of the car.
3 out of the 8 stalls being used outbound, 2 back (including me) A pleasing contrast to the single CCS Ecotricity chargers I encountered elsewhere. About half of which weren't working or were in use or in one case, both ! (Someone was trying to charge their Ioniq but it kept cutting out every couple of minutes)
Will definitely be aiming for Instavolt chargers on longer trips in future.
 

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Hopefully they have already planned how such sites can be expanded to 32 or more chargers. With EV use for long distances travelling double much faster then every year and more people discoveribg these sites the demand will quickly increase.
 

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Well, the closer to home a rapid charger is, the less likely you are to ever use them. :)
A totally dependable rapid cluster close to home does allow V2G without careing about always keeping the car charged for unplanned use.
 

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Sounds good, I look out for them on my drives for the simplicity of use and fair pricing and the fact there's always at least 2 of them but the only one I've used was on business park next to a building in construction with nothing around (lucky we needed just a few kwh) and the last one I considered using was on the car park of a small towns sports ground, with nothing like toilet or a coffee nearby. I needed the 20% to 80% charge on the iPace so went to the ionity charger nearby.
 

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Well, the closer to home a rapid charger is, the less likely you are to ever use them
Unless you don't have a home charger. In which case, far more convenient to use a rapid charging hub than hunting around for a slow street charger to hook up to for hours on end.

What I'm saying is that rapid charging hubs are the answer to drivers with no off-street parking.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hopefully they have already planned how such sites can be expanded to 32 or more chargers. With EV use for long distances travelling double much faster then every year and more people discoveribg these sites the demand will quickly increase.
Lets walk before we can run I'd rather they expanded their doubles to four and fours to eight first. Though there are also the big locations going in with 20-30 chargers and facilities. Can't recall who runs them, first one in Essex IIRC?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Unless you don't have a home charger. In which case, far more convenient to use a rapid charging hub than hunting around for a slow street charger to hook up to for hours on end.

What I'm saying is that rapid charging hubs are the answer to drivers with no off-street parking.
Best place for those would be supermarkets and similar though. No need for a trip on the motorway and something to do while you shop plus The time to charge isn't too far off a big shop.
 

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Supermarkets are too prone to ICEing, and no way would Tesco fence off a section for EVs, much less enforce it.
 

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Lets walk before we can run I'd rather they expanded their doubles to four and fours to eight first. Though there are also the big locations going in with 20-30 chargers and facilities. Can't recall who runs them, first one in Essex IIRC?
GridServe.

Off the M11, near Stansted. Hopefully many more of them soon.
 

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Supermarkets are too prone to ICEing, and no way would Tesco fence off a section for EVs, much less enforce it.
It's got merits. I've charged on 3 occasions at Morisons near Yeovil and Exeter whilst staying nearby and that was very very good. By contrast on another occasion I stayed about 30 min drive from a Ionity charger hub but couldn't be asked to drive there and back just to sit in the car or at whatever hospitality there is at a service station.
 

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Unless you don't have a home charger. In which case, far more convenient to use a rapid charging hub than hunting around for a slow street charger to hook up to for hours on end.

What I'm saying is that rapid charging hubs are the answer to drivers with no off-street parking.

That is very true, I have got some rather condescending comments on this forum when I mention I do not have a Drive/Live in a flat.

A Rapid/Fast Charger network will be needed as so many live in streets/flats where home charging cannot be acheived.
 

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Maybe, but I would expect potential customers for EVs to suss out the relative costs of home charging v charging at a rapid station and then work out that now is not the right time to own a BEV. Long term, I expect electricity for home charging to be taxed, to level up the playing field. Say in about 10 yrs.
 

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Maybe, but I would expect potential customers for EVs to suss out the relative costs of home charging v charging at a rapid station and then work out that now is not the right time to own a BEV. Long term, I expect electricity for home charging to be taxed, to level up the playing field. Say in about 10 yrs.
I think road pricing is much more likely to be the answer to loss of tax revenue. The infrastructure required is effectively almost already there.
 

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Research Briefing
Road pricing
Published Thursday, 06 August, 2020

"Despite a flurry of interest in the idea of a national road pricing scheme in the earlier part of this century, it fell out of favour in about 2008/09 and never regained favour. The 1997-2010 Labour Government looked at a national road pricing scheme in some detail but cooled on the idea after it was negatively received by voters and in the media and faced technological limitations. The Conservative Party has tended to oppose road pricing and has not spoken positively of the idea while in Government over the past decade.

However, in policy circles the debate never entirely went away and many local road charging schemes have been introduced in the past decade, in the UK and abroad. Recently there has been renewed interest in the idea, partly because of the anticipated changes to travel over the next 20-30 years and the common policy aim of all major UK political parties to decarbonise road transport and the implications of such a policy.

Local and central Governments are facing a perfect storm of poor air quality in towns and cities, the adoption of ultra-low emission vehicles (ULEVs) and their long-term impact on car tax and excise duty, and the need to tackle congestion and its knock-on impacts. Together these factors have created a new climate in which some sort of pricing for road use may not only be possible, but acceptable in a way it was not when the Labour Government supported the idea in the mid-2000s.

Over the past decade and a half what surveys there have been of public opinion generally and of drivers specifically, have shown consistent doubts about road pricing. However, they have also shown that these concerns could be ameliorated with certain policies, particularly guarantees that income from road pricing would be spent on certain things (e.g. investment in public transport, road maintenance or reductions in other motoring taxes). That said, there remain many, particularly private motorists, who remain suspicious of the aims of any national road pricing system, what it would achieve and what limits would be set on powers to increase costs without sufficient oversight.

The Government had been expected to respond to the National Infrastructure Assessment by the 2020 Budget, in a comprehensive National Infrastructure Strategy. That did not happen and there is no date set for publication. It is as yet unclear whether the future of motoring taxation, the move to net zero and the question of a national road pricing scheme will be addressed in the Strategy."

 

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Yes, road pricing is more logical and will definitely happen as fuel revenues reduce. This would then leave the massive disparity between the cost of home charging v the cost of rapid charging away from home.
It is true to some extent, that in a mature market, the cost of rapid charging would come down and there will be more workplace and parking place charging but those with home charging will always pay less.
At the moment though and in purely financial terms, a BEV makes no sense unless you have home charging.
 

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At the moment though and in purely financial terms, a BEV makes no sense unless you have home charging.
? Puzzled Lots of workplaces would be accomodating. And Podpoint is free at least in Burton. So for most a day on a podpoint will be free and give a weeks driving. Lots of others as well. If it works for home charging then there are ways to may it work with public chargers.
 

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I did mention that an increase in workplace charging would make a difference but also recognise that the EV charging providers need in the end to make a profit. Some employers may provide workplace charging at cost or even subsidise it, but the massive hospital car park near me currently has none. Given how beneficial to the environment it would be for all hospitals to provide workplace charging, you have to ask what's stopping them?
 

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Also, I have met people who have no home charging. Either or both, they charged at our local Nissan Dealer 3 times a week or left their car in a supermarket car park for and then walked half a mile to work but had to return 3 hours later. Seems just too much of a faff to me although I concede some people manage it.
 
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