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Last November, I finally became the proud (though broke) owner of an E-Niro 4+. I guess this may have different names elsewhere, but it’s basically the latest version available in the UK which I ordered back in July 2020 and received in November.

Here, in very roughly the order of experience, are some of my early impressions of the car which may be of interest to others planning to buy the same model. I had done a test drive of a model 4 a few months earlier to confirm this was the right way to go.

For reference, my previous car was a Mondeo Ghia Estate. This was bought 16 years ago at a time when the government was encouraging low CO2 and ignoring the other polluting factors. It was a great car, and over that length of time, only let me down a few times: 2 broken road springs (wonderful UK road maintenance), 1 jammed starter, 1 dead battery and 1 dead alternator. Only had to use the spare wheel once, despite several punctures. Although still a good car to drive, the underside was starting to rot and would probably have failed the next annual MOT or at least required major welding.

So, a raid on life’s savings, second mortgage, couple of bank jobs, just enough for the E-Niro and a home charger. (Note to literal minded readers – no actual banks were held up in the buying process).

1. First drive home from the showroom:
1.1 Heavy car, very firm suspension (Mondeo was 1.5t, this is around 1.8)
1.2 Bewildering array of knobs, buttons and menus. Luckily, it was a bright dry day, so no wipers or lights needed.
1.3 Indicated range of 283 miles clearly fictional – 20 mile drive used about 30 (see later comments)
1.4 Managed to bypass fear of a prang on exit from showroom and arrived home without a scratch.

2. Next steps:
2.1 Start to understand some of the zillion options.
2.2 Manual as thick as my Oxford dictionary and seemingly more warnings than actual information.
2.3 Started on “what happens when I press that?” process.
2.4 At some point, managed to reset everything so lost all my radio favourites and subsequently seemed to be driving much too fast (see later).
2.5 Gave up on UVO for the moment owing to smartphone problems (a whole other story there).
2.6 Threw out the ridiculous chunks of polystyrene taking up most of the lower boot space.

3. A bit more driving:
3.1 Very responsive. Drove in Eco mode for some time to get used to acceleration.
3.2 Accelerator pedal spring too weak. I find I’m forever holding my foot up to avoid flooring it. (Suspect nothing can be done about this).
3.3 Seemed to be exceeding the speed limit too easily, but on slowing down, drivers behind seemed frustrated.
3.4 Finally realised the reset (above) had changed mph to kph. Mental calculations until I get home to fix it.
3.5 Steering wheel options for tyre pressure units (psi, bar, etc) and temperature (Celsius and Fahrenheit), but no distance/speed unit selection. Huh?
3.6 Finally phoned dealer. “Hold 5 while I get into my model here and figure it out for you.” Short story, select the settings menu and go into the Navigation bit. Yes, folks, the miles/kilometres setting is there, not with the other unit choices.

4. Bings and bongs.
4.1 The vast number of pings, bleeps and jingles has been commented on at length elsewhere.
4.2 Only good bit advice I’ve found (apart from getting out the wire cutters) is to put your seat belt on before hitting Start. You still get the annoying jingle, but fewer bongs. Please, please, please, how can I stop that stupid jingle?
4.3 The lane warning, while useful on motorways when you’re dozing off, is sometimes triggered by cracks in the road (e.g. where cables have been laid). Can be distracting.
4.4 Some beeps can be disabled. Others can’t. Or can they?

5. Other “features”:
5.1 When approaching the car, it waggles its ears (door mirrors) at you. In my narrow drive, this is enough to partly block my entry. I’ve somehow managed to disable this feature (not sure which menu it was). I also keep the key in an RFI pouch most of the time now to avoid a relay theft).
5.2 The automatic headlight turn on is useful, but ...
5.3 On a clear bright day (by UK standards anyway), if a small bird passes in front of the sun, the lights come on and stay on for some time. Much too conservative.
5.4 The wiper auto-start is adjustable but seem to take a while before the first wipe.
5.5 The driver seat auto adjustment warns about crushing the passenger behind after you’ve already opened the door. Being overweight only for the first few weeks after Christmas, I’ve turned this feature off.

6. Tinkering:
6.1 I have a dashcam, so wired this in using one of those fuse jumpers so as not to disturb the existing wiring. Attaching the negative lead to the nearby screw was tricky, but a ratchet spanner with a hinged head had just enough movement in that tricky location.
6.2 A lot has been written about the 12V battery not charging properly on some models, so I’ve fitted a 12V socket to a non-switched circuit (same method as above) to monitor the voltage. No problems so far, but I have a small solar panel and charge regulator from the previous car to use if necessary.

7. Charging:
7.1 Charging only from home AC as yet, will update if I have to use a rapid DC point.
7.2 All well so far. The estimated mileage seems to be settling down at around 254 for a full charge, which, given it’s winter with heating and lights on most of the time, seems reasonable.
7.3 Both the dealer and the manual advise giving a full charge, so for the moment I’m ignoring all the warnings about going only to 80-90% to prolong battery life. Time will tell, I guess. I do tend to drive off straight away after a charge anyway.

8. Conclusion:
8.1 It’s early days yet, but I’ve now worked out what most of the options and menus do.
8.2 The cruise control is great, though at first it can be disconcerting when the car slows or accelerates, or the steering wheel nudges left or right.
8.3 The muscles in my left leg and arm are wasting without a clutch/gearstick to operate!
8.4 Despite any niggles mentioned above, this is a really nice car to drive. Nipping in and out of traffic is much easier given the acceleration, and I’m gradually getting used to a new driving style – almost one pedal operation.
8.5 Having read other posts here, I guess I now have to check my software versions, cable type (1 or 3 phase), etc, etc.
8.6 Or maybe I’ll just get on with my life and enjoy driving the thing for a while. Apart from the jingles.

Comments/questions welcome.
 

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Last November, I finally became the proud (though broke) owner of an E-Niro 4+. I guess this may have different names elsewhere, but it’s basically the latest version available in the UK which I ordered back in July 2020 and received in November.

Here, in very roughly the order of experience, are some of my early impressions of the car which may be of interest to others planning to buy the same model. I had done a test drive of a model 4 a few months earlier to confirm this was the right way to go.

For reference, my previous car was a Mondeo Ghia Estate. This was bought 16 years ago at a time when the government was encouraging low CO2 and ignoring the other polluting factors. It was a great car, and over that length of time, only let me down a few times: 2 broken road springs (wonderful UK road maintenance), 1 jammed starter, 1 dead battery and 1 dead alternator. Only had to use the spare wheel once, despite several punctures. Although still a good car to drive, the underside was starting to rot and would probably have failed the next annual MOT or at least required major welding.

So, a raid on life’s savings, second mortgage, couple of bank jobs, just enough for the E-Niro and a home charger. (Note to literal minded readers – no actual banks were held up in the buying process).

1. First drive home from the showroom:
1.1 Heavy car, very firm suspension (Mondeo was 1.5t, this is around 1.8)
1.2 Bewildering array of knobs, buttons and menus. Luckily, it was a bright dry day, so no wipers or lights needed.
1.3 Indicated range of 283 miles clearly fictional – 20 mile drive used about 30 (see later comments)
1.4 Managed to bypass fear of a prang on exit from showroom and arrived home without a scratch.

2. Next steps:
2.1 Start to understand some of the zillion options.
2.2 Manual as thick as my Oxford dictionary and seemingly more warnings than actual information.
2.3 Started on “what happens when I press that?” process.
2.4 At some point, managed to reset everything so lost all my radio favourites and subsequently seemed to be driving much too fast (see later).
2.5 Gave up on UVO for the moment owing to smartphone problems (a whole other story there).
2.6 Threw out the ridiculous chunks of polystyrene taking up most of the lower boot space.

3. A bit more driving:
3.1 Very responsive. Drove in Eco mode for some time to get used to acceleration.
3.2 Accelerator pedal spring too weak. I find I’m forever holding my foot up to avoid flooring it. (Suspect nothing can be done about this).
3.3 Seemed to be exceeding the speed limit too easily, but on slowing down, drivers behind seemed frustrated.
3.4 Finally realised the reset (above) had changed mph to kph. Mental calculations until I get home to fix it.
3.5 Steering wheel options for tyre pressure units (psi, bar, etc) and temperature (Celsius and Fahrenheit), but no distance/speed unit selection. Huh?
3.6 Finally phoned dealer. “Hold 5 while I get into my model here and figure it out for you.” Short story, select the settings menu and go into the Navigation bit. Yes, folks, the miles/kilometres setting is there, not with the other unit choices.

4. Bings and bongs.
4.1 The vast number of pings, bleeps and jingles has been commented on at length elsewhere.
4.2 Only good bit advice I’ve found (apart from getting out the wire cutters) is to put your seat belt on before hitting Start. You still get the annoying jingle, but fewer bongs. Please, please, please, how can I stop that stupid jingle?
4.3 The lane warning, while useful on motorways when you’re dozing off, is sometimes triggered by cracks in the road (e.g. where cables have been laid). Can be distracting.
4.4 Some beeps can be disabled. Others can’t. Or can they?

5. Other “features”:
5.1 When approaching the car, it waggles its ears (door mirrors) at you. In my narrow drive, this is enough to partly block my entry. I’ve somehow managed to disable this feature (not sure which menu it was). I also keep the key in an RFI pouch most of the time now to avoid a relay theft).
5.2 The automatic headlight turn on is useful, but ...
5.3 On a clear bright day (by UK standards anyway), if a small bird passes in front of the sun, the lights come on and stay on for some time. Much too conservative.
5.4 The wiper auto-start is adjustable but seem to take a while before the first wipe.
5.5 The driver seat auto adjustment warns about crushing the passenger behind after you’ve already opened the door. Being overweight only for the first few weeks after Christmas, I’ve turned this feature off.

6. Tinkering:
6.1 I have a dashcam, so wired this in using one of those fuse jumpers so as not to disturb the existing wiring. Attaching the negative lead to the nearby screw was tricky, but a ratchet spanner with a hinged head had just enough movement in that tricky location.
6.2 A lot has been written about the 12V battery not charging properly on some models, so I’ve fitted a 12V socket to a non-switched circuit (same method as above) to monitor the voltage. No problems so far, but I have a small solar panel and charge regulator from the previous car to use if necessary.

7. Charging:
7.1 Charging only from home AC as yet, will update if I have to use a rapid DC point.
7.2 All well so far. The estimated mileage seems to be settling down at around 254 for a full charge, which, given it’s winter with heating and lights on most of the time, seems reasonable.
7.3 Both the dealer and the manual advise giving a full charge, so for the moment I’m ignoring all the warnings about going only to 80-90% to prolong battery life. Time will tell, I guess. I do tend to drive off straight away after a charge anyway.

8. Conclusion:
8.1 It’s early days yet, but I’ve now worked out what most of the options and menus do.
8.2 The cruise control is great, though at first it can be disconcerting when the car slows or accelerates, or the steering wheel nudges left or right.
8.3 The muscles in my left leg and arm are wasting without a clutch/gearstick to operate!
8.4 Despite any niggles mentioned above, this is a really nice car to drive. Nipping in and out of traffic is much easier given the acceleration, and I’m gradually getting used to a new driving style – almost one pedal operation.
8.5 Having read other posts here, I guess I now have to check my software versions, cable type (1 or 3 phase), etc, etc.
8.6 Or maybe I’ll just get on with my life and enjoy driving the thing for a while. Apart from the jingles.

Comments/questions welcome.
Thank you for posting.

1.4 Managed to bypass fear of a prang on exit from showroom and arrived home without a scratch.
:) :) Yes I felt the same and have done with every new car I buy.

2.5 Gave up on UVO for the moment owing to smartphone problems (a whole other story there).
:) :) Don't give up on the UVO App,, to date mine works very well.

5.5 The driver seat auto adjustment warns about crushing the passenger behind after you’ve already opened the door.
:) :) First thing I turned off.

6.2 A lot has been written about the 12V battery not charging properly on some models.
:( Yes I have been watching this with interest.

8.1 It’s early days yet, but I’ve now worked out what most of the options and menus do.
:) :) Menu system is a little different but soon found my way around it.

8.2 The cruise control is great, though at first it can be disconcerting when the car slows or accelerates, or the steering wheel nudges left or right.
:) :) Had all this stuff on my MK3 Superb,

8.5 Having read other posts here, I guess I now have to check my software versions, cable type (1 or 3 phase), etc, etc.
:) :) Yes I made sure dealer had checked that the correct charging cables had been supplied, as for the Software Update, well they failed miserably on that one, goes in o the 18th for update.

So far, like you I am very impressed with the car, this is my first Kia, as I said in my post, just wish Kia had used a little more soft plastics, especially on the door trims.
 

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Kia e-Niro MY20 64 kWh - Gravity Blue
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About charging to 100%: don't. At least, not every day. The manual says do this once a month to balance the cells. It will not do enormous harm, but if you want to keep the car as long as the Mondeo, then charge to 80% daily and only charge to 100% if you have a long trip ahead or indeed once a month. Do not leave it at 100% without taking the car for a drive the next day.

Lane Keep Assist (so the one that works without having cruise control enabled) works well on straight roads and is a pain on winding, curvy roads. Luckily it can be disabled with a button.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the comments above. I'll look into the charging thing again at some point, but only need to charge every 1 or 2 weeks anyway, my mileage at the moment is so small. Well, right now, with the lock down and the fact that my car is buried in a foot of snow, it's zero!

The UVO app issue is a long story, but the short version is this. My previous Samsung was rooted. My current one isn't, but refused to run the app. After several weeks of trial and error, various forums, etc, it turned out that when transferring stuff to the new phone, I'd copied over a (now useless) root management app. Deleting this has solved the problem, just haven't had the will to restart the process, and besides, it's only 3 paces from my front door to check the status.

As for the cable, yep, the idiots have given me a single phase one. Not an issue at the moment, but I'll be banging on their door as soon as they reopen.

Haven't checked the firmware version yet, but won't be surprised if it's not up to date. Does the latest give you any significant advantages or bug fixes?

As a matter of interest, for various reasons I went for the rather pricey Zappi home charger. This does give you some indication of how much charge is going in, and how much (if any) the solar array is contributing. It also shows how much charge you have put in over the current and previous month, so you can calculate the cost (still on a fixed rate, smart meter finally installed but not commissioned yet - and that's yet another story).
 

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For 12V just make sure the battery saver option is enabled.
It should be on by default but worth checking.
It tops up the 12V on a regular schedule when enabled.

The jingles are the thing I'd like to disable.
It's a pretty good car if that's the major quibble :)
Oh and I kind of want awd as there's enough poke to light up the front wheels even at 30mph in the wet!
Having too much torque is not really a criticism!

I also navigated my way home in kph when I got my car. Some things never change! :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, battery saver is on. From what I've read, the new algorithm is better than the old one where the top up went to sleep if the car was left any length of time. That's assuming I have recent software of course. I probably won't drive at all for the next week or so, so I'll be monitoring the 12V SoC to see what happens.

AWD would be nice. Only tried Sport mode a couple of times, but being a fairly conservative old git of a driver, normal or even eco is good enough for me. The poke does help though when aiming for that small gap in the rush hour traffic at a busy roundabout - no fear of stalling half way across.
 

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If 12V voltage drops, you can use Utility Mode to charge it, no need to connect an external charger.
 

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1.3 Indicated range of 283 miles clearly fictional – 20 mile drive used about 30 (see later comments)

....

3.2 Accelerator pedal spring too weak. I find I’m forever holding my foot up to avoid flooring it. (Suspect nothing can be done about this).
My first reaction was these two are probably related ;)

you’ll find the distance to empty or guess-o-meter is actually pretty good in the Niro. If your driving style is consistent this will calibrate to the Mi/kWh you get in reality. As you say 250odd for winter isn’t bad. Short journeys use more. I’ve noticed it takes about 8-10 miles before the energy use drops, probably some battery heating going on.

With battery saver on I’ve had no issues. I’m hoping those issues are behind us Kia drivers now.... when it does the 12v charge one of the green dash charge status lights flashes... it’s in the manual, but of course that doesn’t help.... just in case you notice it and wonder why, as I did.
 

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My first reaction was these two are probably related ;)

you’ll find the distance to empty or guess-o-meter is actually pretty good in the Niro. If your driving style is consistent this will calibrate to the Mi/kWh you get in reality. As you say 250odd for winter isn’t bad. Short journeys use more. I’ve noticed it takes about 8-10 miles before the energy use drops, probably some battery heating going on.

With battery saver on I’ve had no issues. I’m hoping those issues are behind us Kia drivers now.... when it does the 12v charge one of the green dash charge status lights flashes... it’s in the manual, but of course that doesn’t help.... just in case you notice it and wonder why, as I did.
Spotted the a green charge light flashing yesterday, thought what the hell is that, I believe the online manual has the lights numbered incorrectly, if you look, viewing from outside the car, as shown in the diagram, my lamps (as per the manual drawing below) where showing, 3,2 off, 1 was blinking.
To that end, should the manual drawing be showing:
1 is actually 3
2 is 2
3 is actually 1.
So looking at the picture below from left to right would be 3 - 2 - 1, because it was the far left (1 in the diagram) that was blinking, no charging cable was connected.

Just to note that when I had the car on charge, with 80% in the battery, 3, 2 are solid green, 1 was blinking, complete opposite of what is shown below.
Or am I just going mad.

139421
 

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You are right, and the table above is right, it is the illustration that is wrong and should be ignored. The three green lights are numbered from left to right in the car.
 

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I always understood it's left to right from outside, which I believe the lights are actually intended for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If 12V voltage drops, you can use Utility Mode to charge it, no need to connect an external charger.
Unless I'm a thousand miles away for a couple of weeks [chance would be a fine thing atm, but one can dream]
 
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