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Leaf 30kWh, Outlander PHEV
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Now that the school's have started, I am starting to realise that Outlander PHEV while decent, is something I am having to charge often more than once a day as I am using it up more than I thought.

This month I have done over 350 EV miles driving kids to school, taking my son to tennis etc.

The max range of 2017 PHEV is about 23 miles around town and at higher speeds, it drops like a stone - more like 15 at 70mph.

I wonder if its possible to take existing pack and swap the LEV40 cells for higher capacity Leaf40 / Gen 4 modules.
Any thoughts @muxsan ?

Do others who use Outlander find this limiting and wish it had greater range or is it just me?
 

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Outlander
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Do others who use Outlander find this limiting and wish it had greater range or is it just me?
The maximum pure-EV performance I managed in the Outlander PHEV was 34 miles, which is (or was) exactly my daily mileage. Tentative driving required, regeneration disabled at steady speeds, regeneration on max when braking, and some luck with the weather.

If the battery can be swapped out then I would sign-up for an upgrade because doing so would relax my driving. There might be red flags though because I doubt battery upgrades were an original design consideration - the cells might be embedded in the car with esoteric connectors and obscure computer communications.

The carefully designed cooling airflow around the battery would be a further concern. There would need to be a level of confidence that the replacement battery will last as long as the original.
 

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Leaf 30kWh, Outlander PHEV
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Discussion Starter #3
If the battery can be swapped out then I would sign-up for an upgrade. There might be red flags though because I doubt battery upgrades were an original design consideration - the cells might be embedded in the car with esoteric connectors and obscure computer communications.

The maximum pure-EV performance I managed in the Outlander PHEV was 34 miles, which is (or was) exactly my daily mileage. Tentative driving required.
I seriously doubt that it is that complex. If cells are replaced while using original BMS, the system should use then without significant changes. Most cars operate on CAN and a small update might be required to inform of additional capacity.

Muxsan already support Leaf battery swaps all the way to 62kWh packs.

From what I've read, if you find newer 13.2kWh pack, those are the easiest swaps


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Tesla Model S, Ford Transit Flt Bed (Smiths), Mitsubishi i-MiEV, Vectrix VX-1, Aixam Mega City
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I have fairly extensive experience of the BMS in the Mitsu i-MiEV (see i-MiEV With Failing Battery - Another CMU LTC chip Failure?) and, as you may know, much of the Outlander's drive electronics are very closely related to the i-MiEVs. The BMS in the i-MiEV counts energy in and out of the pack and if it counted more than it expected to find (ie if you increased the cell capacity) it would almost certainly register it as a DTC (diagnostic trouble code) on the CANbus and prevent the car from starting.

So, probably (and do take what I say with a large pinch of salt as I am no expert) the only way to do it would be to somehow fox the current sensor into under reading the current in proportion to the increase in battery size. That may be easier said than done and might cause other confusion in the system that would also shut the car down/prevent it from starting.

Actually, I found this thread looking for info on ditching the ICE and installing a bigger battery on the basis that the Outlander is currently just about the only affordable (ie well-used) 4x4 that has an electric drivetrain and have found nothing so far...
 
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