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Perfectly reasonable to criticise public charging as only way availability and reliability will change. I wish though it was balanced by fact that a lot of EV drivers a.know about limitations and still make it work for them b. Some potential EV users will wait a while before be de-icing and that is reasonable and some will jump the EV ship when they find that currently EVs do not work for them and that is reasonable as well (although probably just a small percentage). c. most current EV drivers charge at home/work or a mix of and as in our case rarely have to go near a public chargepoint anyways (a lot better than being exposed to fluctuating fuel prices, diminishing number of gas stations, sticking diesel in a petrol car, etc.

Still positive news is not that common in our media these days...
 

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EVs must have been made just for me. My longest trip is generally 15 miles. I charge up in my garage on a cheap rate overnight every few days when 50% - 70% SOC. Occasional trips to my daughters, 80 miles - 50% SOC and charge at night after return. One trip in 12months of 180 miles and charged at Instavolt when down to 50%. One overnight stay and charged from hotel room. No worries!
 

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If your experience prior to getting your own car was limited to that of EVs, I believe you would have struggled owning a ICE vehicle. You would have had the expectation to arrive home or at the supermarket and fill up the tank from some pipe, maybe the gas pipe; or you would have left your car at the pump and go for a meal. That is the difference, it's cultural, societal: everyone knows how ICEV operate because everyone have them and the generation before had them, so knowledge flows easily. Because it is ingrained in our culture so deeply, we don't think other ways are reasonable.

Many people in Romania have used their home air conditioning units as HVAC units for a pretty long time, because no one taught them otherwise, there was no cultural knowledge about how those things work because no one before my generation had access to such machines to know otherwise. Machines were misused, some people got ill, but overtime, because of knowledge sharing, people got to know how to use them.

If future EV owners come to the technology because of the misleading information given by journalists, they will despise the technology, not the journalist. I don't think many EV drivers will tell you that owning an EV is or should be as practical as owning an ICEV; they have their strengths and weaknesses. We capitalize on strengths and we mitigate the weaknesses. The fact that a journalist doesn't appreciate these differences and assumes that an EV has to behave exactly like an ICEV doesn't make the technology impractical, it makes the journalist ignorant.

Journalists have the ability to disseminate information, they have the privilege to be in an informational authoritative position (they have the authority to change people's perceptions). This is a responsibility and it comes with obligations and two of those obligations are research and integrity. Having expectations are neither research, nor integrity.

Why not have a featured article, a 500 miles drive with an EV owner, to get to understand how they think when it comes to driving their car? Make it a live-stream! Put the transcript online. Maybe that would make some readers think "hey, that lifestyle would work fine for me", while others will think "well, I will never get an EV because that lifestyle sucks"; and that's fine! Actually, that's far better than what many journalists are doing today: "i got a car for a week and it sucks".

Today my arguments with many potential EV owners revolve around what's being said in the press and the first thing I tell them is to not trust people that have not owned such an item from less than a few months, because you cannot draw a solid conclusion if you're ignorant about things.
Good post ?
 
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