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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, we have ordered a Niro PHEV which arrives in Sep but am now looking at options for charging. It's my wife's car and it needs to be convenient to charge and allow her to reverse into the drive. At the dealership a 5m cable will reach but it will be in mid air (which I think isn't ideal), and I'm not keen having a granny lead used unless it's on it's own ring (which means extra cost anyway, plus the granny lead doesn't look like something that will last long term exposed to the elements). Therefore I think I'm looking at a dedicated charger with a 7m tether (unless someone convinces me of a better option).

I started off (like many others I guess) looking at PodPoint but the rumblings about them have got me to look around and HyperVolt looks like an option.

So, I have a few questions:

  • Am I wasting my money and should look at a 32A commando connection?
  • Can any approved installed buy and install a HyperVolt and claim the grant back?
  • Is PodPoint that bad, and is there any benefit in having them (e.g. are there discounts when using their public chargers)?
  • Anyone know of a installer in Surrey that offers NHS discount?
 

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Your next car will be 7.2kW one so get a 32amp chargepoint and at least you will not need to change it. Do you have or are intending to get solar panels? If so look at the points that can use solar like tha Zappi and similar.
An independent installer who is OLEV registered can install any chargepoint though some don't feel the paperwork and time to get paid is worth it. You may find it cheaper not to have the grant.

You only get one grant unless you keep the phev and add a second ev and charge point.
 

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Not sure if this helps... granted I've only had it a few weeks, but my PodPoint is fine so far - very professionally installed, looks ok, works, 7.5m tethered lead. Had to take a million photos to send off beforehand, but that's acceptable. Not aware of any special benefits when using their public chargers - we've only used one of those so far and that was a free destination charger.
 

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So, we have ordered a Niro PHEV which arrives in Sep but am now looking at options for charging. It's my wife's car and it needs to be convenient to charge and allow her to reverse into the drive. At the dealership a 5m cable will reach but it will be in mid air (which I think isn't ideal), and I'm not keen having a granny lead used unless it's on it's own ring (which means extra cost anyway, plus the granny lead doesn't look like something that will last long term exposed to the elements). Therefore I think I'm looking at a dedicated charger with a 7m tether (unless someone convinces me of a better option).

I started off (like many others I guess) looking at PodPoint but the rumblings about them have got me to look around and HyperVolt looks like an option.

So, I have a few questions:

  • Am I wasting my money and should look at a 32A commando connection?
  • Can any approved installed buy and install a HyperVolt and claim the grant back?
  • Is PodPoint that bad, and is there any benefit in having them (e.g. are there discounts when using their public chargers)?
  • Anyone know of a installer in Surrey that offers NHS discount?
To answer the bullet points:
  • Youd have to work the costs out for this, it may probably cost more for this option if you are getting an electrician in to install the commando (i.e. cost of the ohme plus electrician installing a new circuit). If you have a mate thats a sparky it may work out?
  • Yes, installers now do not have to be approved by the manufacturer to claim the EVHS. They do need the EVHS approval and installer number from OZEV. This is different from the WCS.
  • I think what you have to remember is that podpoint have been around for a while (google says around 12yrs?) and that they have a lot of units installed (car manufacturer deals/car parks/supermarkets/etc). So there are alot more reviews on the web compared to other manufacturers. They have had a few problems over the years, but then again they are quite a big manufacturer so their support maybe better then a newer/smaller manufacturer. Hypervolt look good, but seem to of only been around for a little while... 1yr?
  • Not that many would recommend them on here but i know rolec had a direct deal with the nhs. They were installing points at homes for people who worked at local surgery's...
I currently advise not going for thethered units for a few reasons: unsightly, targeted for scrap theft, limited ability to change the length without voiding warranty... although the andersen unit i would recommend (pricey though!).

I believe the grant runs out in march 2022? So if you want to take advantage, now would be the time? (Although, no doubt the units will drop in price when it runs out, just like solar!)..

I currently recommend the UT zappis atm.. its a futureproof unit (if you ever think about installing microgeneration) and has the required protection.
 

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Thanks for all the responses, is scrap theft really a thing for tethered units?
Unfortunately yes, just do a quick google to find related stories..

They are pretty knowledgeable with regards to electrics. We had a big project over the country at un-manned sites. The client had such a big problem with scrap theft that we had to install all the earth cables (green and yellow cables) in black! As the thieves knew that green and yellow was dead and good to steal. Leaving the site in a very insafe condition!

So seeing a nice coiled up cable on a charger, normally means its not on, and then a quick snip and they are away.. untethered units get targeted to, but if you have the the cable hid away in your boot for the majority of the time, then there is a lot less chance. To add, there are some charging cable locks that you can buy that go around the cable and locks to your wheels...
 

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There are loads of stories about the potential for cable theft, but very,very few reports of actual cable thefts. This is an EV forum and I cannot recall a single report in the couple of years I've been here of a tethered cable theft from someone's home. Personally I think that what happened with this story if that someone thought cable theft might be a problem, wrote a story about it, linking this possibility with other cable thefts (like railway signalling cables, power cables, etc) and the story then grew legs and got picked up by many other media outlets.

Perhaps worth starting a poll here to ask how many people have personally experienced a tethered cable theft in the UK.

I've had two tethered charge points installed at two different houses since 2013, with both being empty for when we were at the other one. We now had two tethered charge points here, and frankly I'm not even slightly worried about anyone cutting the cable and stealing it. The bottom line is that the scrap value of a tethered cable is less than a fiver, and there are much easier ways to make a fiver that cutting off a charge cable. If theft was a major problem, then we'd see tethered rapid charger cables getting nicked, as they have maybe £20 of scrap copper in them.
 

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For what it's worth, the practical daily benefit of a tethered unit vastly outweighs the negligible risk of theft. This is yet another problem perceived rather than real. I've lost count of the number of people who installed a socket unit and within a few months had to buy a second cable to take away on trips because they had secured the first one to the wall unit to emulate the tethered version they should have fitted in the first place. Trust me, fighting with a wet cable in and out of the boot daily soon becomes old.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Unfortunately yes, just do a quick google to find related stories..

They are pretty knowledgeable with regards to electrics. We had a big project over the country at un-manned sites. The client had such a big problem with scrap theft that we had to install all the earth cables (green and yellow cables) in black! As the thieves knew that green and yellow was dead and good to steal. Leaving the site in a very insafe condition!

So seeing a nice coiled up cable on a charger, normally means its not on, and then a quick snip and they are away.. untethered units get targeted to, but if you have the the cable hid away in your boot for the majority of the time, then there is a lot less chance. To add, there are some charging cable locks that you can buy that go around the cable and locks to your wheels...
Cheers, the charging point is under three CCTVs from different angles so not too fussed about that TBH.
 

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For what it's worth, the practical daily benefit of a tethered unit vastly outweighs the negligible risk of theft. This is yet another problem perceived rather than real. I've lost count of the number of people who installed a socket unit and within a few months had to buy a second cable to take away on trips because they had secured the first one to the wall unit to emulate the tethered version they should have fitted in the first place. Trust me, fighting with a wet cable in and out of the boot daily soon becomes old.

I agree, and the first charge point I installed here, back when I was still building the house, was a box with a socket, rather than a tethered one. At the time my thinking was that this was still a building site, and a tethered cable would possibly get damaged, mucky, etc. After about a month of using the lead that came with the car every day, I got so frustrated that I changed the unit over for a tethered one. It's so much less hassle to use a tethered one, that even if the cable got nicked I'd just replace it with another one. If you get a tethered cable that doesn't tangle, and which coils almost by itself (the ones we have now are both like this) then it's even less hassle. Nothing worse than faffing around in the cold a wet on a dark winter's evening trying to get leads out and plugged in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I agree, and the first charge point I installed here, back when I was still building the house, was a box with a socket, rather than a tethered one. At the time my thinking was that this was still a building site, and a tethered cable would possibly get damaged, mucky, etc. After about a month of using the lead that came with the car every day, I got so frustrated that I changed the unit over for a tethered one. It's so much less hassle to use a tethered one, that even if the cable got nicked I'd just replace it with another one. If you get a tethered cable that doesn't tangle, and which coils almost by itself (the ones we have now are both like this) then it's even less hassle. Nothing worse than faffing around in the cold a wet on a dark winter's evening trying to get leads out and plugged in.
If I don't have a tethered cable, the wife won't use it. If the wife won't use it, then it'll only be charged when I do it. If she does it, she'll see how easy it is and do it all the time :)
 

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I actually have an untethered unit but only because my car is older and has a type 1 socket, the next will be type 2 so that is why it was fitted. Used as a tethered with the cable locked to the wall, its been 6 years now and no-one has nicked it. Did save some hassle when the original cable failed after many years, the thin CP cable fractured inside it.
I'd recommend a tethered one to new owners, only a few used cars are type 1 now.
 

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If I don't have a tethered cable, the wife won't use it. If the wife won't use it, then it'll only be charged when I do it. If she does it, she'll see how easy it is and do it all the time :)
Personally I would go tethered and not worry about it. Saves having to coil it up in the boot / put it in the house / put it in the garage when you leave.
 

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I installed a project EV charger, socketed but you can lock the cable into the charger using the app so best of both worlds. This allowed me to have a coiled tether so quite neat for cable management. ( I have a separate dummy type 2 socket on the wall to store the plug when not in use ).
Plant Hood Leaf Automotive tire Road surface
 

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There are loads of stories about the potential for cable theft, but very,very few reports of actual cable thefts. This is an EV forum and I cannot recall a single report in the couple of years I've been here of a tethered cable theft from someone's home. Personally I think that what happened with this story if that someone thought cable theft might be a problem, wrote a story about it, linking this possibility with other cable thefts (like railway signalling cables, power cables, etc) and the story then grew legs and got picked up by many other media outlets.

Perhaps worth starting a poll here to ask how many people have personally experienced a tethered cable theft in the UK.

I've had two tethered charge points installed at two different houses since 2013, with both being empty for when we were at the other one. We now had two tethered charge points here, and frankly I'm not even slightly worried about anyone cutting the cable and stealing it. The bottom line is that the scrap value of a tethered cable is less than a fiver, and there are much easier ways to make a fiver that cutting off a charge cable. If theft was a major problem, then we'd see tethered rapid charger cables getting nicked, as they have maybe £20 of scrap copper in them.
I can see your point of view, and how a story like this would develop and build (especially with anything new!)

I have 5 close family and 1 friend within 3 different police services. This was mentioned to me a while back by one of them pointing out a said online article (as you say not an actual account, more of speculation). Since then, I edge on the side of caution and do not actively promote the tethered units.

Dependant on cable length and type, with bright copper scrap value fluctuatating between 6-7k you'd get a bit more of around £10-20 per cable. Thats good going for someone who is used to unbolting and lugging around steel fences for a couple of quid.

I do still stand by the recommendation for untethered units though.. Dependent on charger, if you cant be bothered to remove one end after you remove the other end from the car, and after you've coiled it up, then you all you have to do is just leave it plugged in to the charger and locked. You have the choice with the untethered, with thethered you dont.

You can buy another length cable from that what was supplied with the car and have 2 cables with you everywhere you go, and always a spare.

Its great saying you can just change the tethered cable, but not everyone has the aptitude to do this.

Anyway, the OP says he has cameras and a Mrs that wants a tethered unit. Always please the other half when switching to the EV culture. Of which 9/10 of them are usually not convinced until you have one. So keep them happy 😊
 

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It comes down to a personal risk assessment, based on what crime is like in any particular area, and how someone feels about the hassle of getting the lead out of the car and plugging it in every time they charge. For me, this latter point got to be really irritating, fairly quickly. It was winter, so the hassle was worse because of the weather, but I'd gladly accept a very tiny possible theft risk for the ease of just grabbing a tethered cable and plugging it in.
 

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It comes down to a personal risk assessment, based on what crime is like in any particular area, and how someone feels about the hassle of getting the lead out of the car and plugging it in every time they charge. For me, this latter point got to be really irritating, fairly quickly. It was winter, so the hassle was worse because of the weather, but I'd gladly accept a very tiny possible theft risk for the ease of just grabbing a tethered cable and plugging it in.
Depends what you're used to I suppose! After 5 and a half years of not being able to charge at home, the 90 seconds it takes to get the cable out of the boot and plug the car in is no effort whatsoever compared to driving to a car park, leaving the car there and walking/cycling home for the day or wasting away at rapid chargers!

Certainly not enough effort to justify the rather horrible look of unnecessarily long cables hanging around on the wall, and extra expense of the tethered charger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Depends what you're used to I suppose! After 5 and a half years of not being able to charge at home, the 90 seconds it takes to get the cable out of the boot and plug the car in is no effort whatsoever compared to driving to a car park, leaving the car there and walking/cycling home for the day or wasting away at rapid chargers!

Certainly not enough effort to justify the rather horrible look of unnecessarily long cables hanging around on the wall, and extra expense of the tethered charger.
Horses for course, and we are different. I know for a fact that having a tethered charger will make it more likely that my wife will use it.
 

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I know for a fact that having a tethered charger will make it more likely that my wife will use it.
I can vouch for that. And the same comment came from a mate around the corner with his PHEV. With him it's a bit more important of course as every trip really needs to be plugged in after or more petrol is used. But for sure, my wife has no issues grabbing the plug and poking it in. But asking her to fight with a wet and dirty cable in and out of the boot would receive the death stare.
 

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Horses for course, and we are different. I know for a fact that having a tethered charger will make it more likely that my wife will use it.
Definitely the case for my wife! I had originally fitted a charge point on our garage, which is around 30m or so from the house, and she parks outside it. Before she got her Zoe I moved that charge point and fitted it on a post, right by the driver's door of her car in her usual parking spot. This not only meant it was a lot easier for her to use, but also reduced the length of tethered cable, making it look neater.

I'm a great fan of charge points on posts now. I first fitted one like this around 8 years ago, at our old house, to avoid trailing a cable several metres across the drive, and both our charge points here are post mounted. I'm thinking of moving the one I use all the time to be on a post at the edge of a hedge next to where I park, to make it both a bit neater looking and easier to use. It has a 10m cable on at the moment, because the I-Pace charge port is in the front wing, about as far from the existing post as it is possible to get. All my previous plug in cars have had the charge port at the rear (Prius PHEV, BMW i3, Tesla Model 3).
 
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