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Vauxhall Corsa-e (Elite Nav Premium)
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It is odd how the different networks have such different pricing. If you compare petrol stations within a town they all tend to be within a few pence of each other.
I'd bet this is going to change with mass EV uptake. People will simply not use the expensive ones, and they'll be forced to reconsider their prices.
 

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Kia E Niro 4
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I think EV users have to ask themselves which is more important a reliable charging network or budget pricing. These companies are not charities and need to be viable, wholesale electric prices are high at the moment and they need to make a profit. EV's are still by and large cheaper to run than a diesel
 

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I'd rather pay a higher price for a network that is reliable and expanding (Instavolt, Osprey) than a lower price for a network stagnating and contracting (CYC, Ecotricity) or only growing at a snail's pace based on single rapids at busy supermarkets (Podpoint, Geniepoint).
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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I'd rather pay a higher price for a network that is reliable and expanding (Instavolt, Osprey) than a lower price for a network stagnating and contracting (CYC, Ecotricity) or only growing at a snail's pace based on single rapids at busy supermarkets (Podpoint, Geniepoint).
That was precisely my argument for signing up with Polar, even though I didn't use it that much.

Oh well .... I tried to support it ...

I don't believe that 'loyalty' is ever returned in the capitalist system. You can do business with companies and people you like to make you feel better, or are simply easier to deal with so save you time, but it is unlikely to represent the best deal.

This is precisely where 'salesmanship' has been lost. They knew about this sort of stuff decades ago, my father even had a set of Ford training literature about how to sell cars, dating from the 60's. They knew about things then. The art of salesmanship is was to do a trade with a customer that they feel good about, so good that even if they saw a cheaper deal for the same thing the next day they wouldn't feel ripped off. Nowadays, that is precisely what we are conditioned to think. A good salesman never lets their customer suffer buyer's regret.
 

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I'd bet this is going to change with mass EV uptake. People will simply not use the expensive ones, and they'll be forced to reconsider their prices.
That strategy never worked for petrol & diesel. They just all raise their prices.
 

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GOLF GTE PHEV
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That strategy never worked for petrol & diesel. They just all raise their prices.
Indeed, there is never a race for the bottom.

In fact I am surprised some networks have not already matched prices with the more expensive ones.

It seems remiss of them to still be flogging power at a loss or zero profit, and even if they are tied into a fixed price contract from their supplier, why wouldn't they make a few extra quid by price matching?
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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We're still in a world of confusion-marketing when it comes to EV charging, but there are plenty of models like that and we're doomed to suffer them.

I mean .. imagine that when you used your mobile phone you had a choice of network (without subscriptions), each one showing how much some particular call would cost. I wonder how that would change the mobile phone market? But this is just a dream and mobile phone calls are not going to be like buying litres of fuel, and I have no particular reason to believe EV charging ever will, either.
 

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GOLF GTE PHEV
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We're still in a world of confusion-marketing when it comes to EV charging, but there are plenty of models like that and we're doomed to suffer them.

I mean .. imagine that when you used your mobile phone you had a choice of network (without subscriptions), each one showing how much some particular call would cost. I wonder how that would change the mobile phone market? But this is just a dream and mobile phone calls are not going to be like buying litres of fuel, and I have no particular reason to believe EV charging ever will, either.
I'm not sure about that.
I can forsee an app that ranks chargers within a given radius of your location based on price per kWh.
 

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Indeed, there is never a race for the bottom.

In fact I am surprised some networks have not already matched prices with the more expensive ones.

It seems remiss of them to still be flogging power at a loss or zero profit, and even if they are tied into a fixed price contract from their supplier, why wouldn't they make a few extra quid by price matching?
I really, really don't understand why anyone would be surprised by that. I would be wholly unsurprised to learn they are making a loss at any price below £1/kWh.

The only way is to get a subscription service in place, wherein the subscriptions from everyone covers the base costs, spreading the costs across everyone, and then the profit comes by selling leccy for a bit more than wholesale.

In fact .... like the proposal I made 6 years ago!
 

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I'm not sure about that.
I can forsee an app that ranks chargers within a given radius of your location based on price per kWh.
As last post, I don't believe there is any future in no-subscription ad hoc charging. It just has to work out waaay to expensive. At least, for any time in the next decade or so.

In the absence of a subscription, the costs would be high, it'd be akin to buying petrol from a motorway service location, something you'd do for convenience and time and you ignore the cost momentarily thus not be shopping around.

What I see more of is people offering their own charge points in town centres to rent out while people go shopping, or live in flats or such, and some profit-based calculation scheme that goes along with that.
 

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GOLF GTE PHEV
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As last post, I don't believe there is any future in no-subscription ad hoc charging. It just has to work out waaay to expensive. At least, for any time in the next decade or so.

In the absence of a subscription, the costs would be high, it'd be akin to buying petrol from a motorway service location, something you'd do for convenience and time and you ignore the cost momentarily thus not be shopping around.

What I see more of is people offering their own charge points in town centres to rent out while people go shopping, or live in flats or such, and some profit-based calculation scheme that goes along with that.
You've got it back to front!

It's going to be all PAYG contactless ad hoc charging in the future.

No one wants to have to use an app or rfid card or drive around looking for a charger on a network they have subscribed to.

I've only once used a Gridserve charger that was contaactless and it was as quick and easy as paying for my groceries.

Roll on coin operated chargers.
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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You've got it back to front!

It's going to be all PAYG contactless ad hoc charging in the future.

No one wants to have to use an app or rfid card or drive around looking for a charger on a network they have subscribed to.

I've only once used a Gridserve charger that was contaactless and it was as quick and easy as paying for my groceries.

Roll on coin operated chargers.
I understand that is what YOU want, but that is not what the charger companies want.

Just because that is what you want doesn't mean you are going to get it.

Why should they do what you are proposing? It isn't working for them at the moment.

Why do you think it isn't like that at the moment? Why have they been dragging their heels to put that in place? Why do you think Gov has had to mandate it as a regulation, if the companies would want to do that anyway?
 

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GOLF GTE PHEV
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I understand that is what YOU want, but that is not what the charger companies want.

Just because that is what you want doesn't mean you are going to get it.

Why should they do what you are proposing? It isn't working for them at the moment.

Why do you think it isn't like that at the moment? Why have they been dragging their heels to put that in place? Why do you think Gov has had to mandate it as a regulation, if the companies would want to do that anyway?
I get it and it's of course because they want brand loyalty which is easier to ' encourage' if one has the app, or subscription - same as a Teco Clubcard.

So we need an Aldi or Lidl of the EV charging networks - no frills, apps, nor cards.
 

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I get it and it's of course because they want brand loyalty which is easier to ' encourage' if one has the app, or subscription - same as a Teco Clubcard.

So we need an Aldi or Lidl of the EV charging networks - no frills, apps, nor cards.
For sure I cannot predict clearly what is going to happen, but it'll be interesting to see if my prediction turns out to be true, and if so to what degree.

As you say, we might suddenly find [and I mean from announcement by a keen executive, to tangible chargers we can use within a few weeks] that established consumer businesses with existing expansive land holdings and car parks can make a go of offering BEV charging, and somehow make a business off it, even as a loss leader (but not much!).

They can set up loyalty systems, spend £X per month to maintain your discounted kWh rates.

They are then at liberty to charge what they like to ad hoc users and profiteer as much as they dare.

Stand alone businesses that have to acquire land rights, install power, install chargers, all the 24/7 back office support, account management ... seriously, if I had a billion pounds right now I'd prefer to invest it in infrastructure projects in developing countries than in BEV charging in the developed world. But if I was considering investing in a supermarket and it just announced that, then maybe it'd tip my favour.
 

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Tesla Model X 75 D
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I wonder how long Gridserve will stay at 30p. Considering it is one of the better networks and mainly at motorway services I would have expected it to be a higher price.

It is odd how the different networks have such different pricing. If you compare petrol stations within a town they all tend to be within a few pence of each other.
Gridserve charging station was designed to make money by selling electricity to the grid. I'm pretty sure that ev charging is not a profit centre in the business plan of the charging hub roll out. Obviously the electric highway is different, so who knows.
 

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Look at Supermarket petrol stations - loss leading petrol to buy in footfall. If supermarkets replace petrol forecourts with ultra rapid charger banks at cost, you can completely fill up whilst you shop.
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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Not sure they are losing anything at the moment, wholesale price of fuel has dropped, forecourt prices very slow to respond (now, isn't that a shocker!!).
 
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