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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I get used to the way the Ioniq works, and start to use more of the clever features - including adaptive cruise and regen - I'm getting a bit frustrated that I cannot change the braking regen level once the cruise control is initiated. Not only can I not change the regen level setting with the paddles, but I cannot even see what the current setting is.

Am I missing a setting somewhere?
 

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As I get used to the way the Ioniq works, and start to use more of the clever features - including adaptive cruise and regen - I'm getting a bit frustrated that I cannot change the braking regen level once the cruise control is initiated. Not only can I not change the regen level setting with the paddles, but I cannot even see what the current setting is.

Am I missing a setting somewhere?
When cruise control is initiated the car takes over all acceleration and braking - why would you want to change regen? ACC handles all regen so best to just leave it as it is. It might not be as good as the most efficient EV driver but I don't think the .1 mi/kWh benefit is worth the hassle
 

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You can only change the distance between you and the car in front ( by pressing the bottom right button on the steering wheel I think)
 

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The ACC is certified to a set amount of braking force being provided by regen. If you were able to change it, braking curves for all 3 levels of regen would need to be programmed and certified.
 

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The regen level simply changes the relationship between where regen starts on the throttle pedal position (or in the case of level 0) on the brake pedal. As others have mentioned, since the radar cruise control computer controls the braking, the position that takes place on the pedals is irrelevant.
 

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Interestingly, on the original Soul (which does not have ACC but plain CC), the amount of regen available to the cruise control is controlled by the drive mode setting, either B, D with eco on and D with eco off.

I’ve noticed this going down the rather steep hill outside of Houghton Le Spring on the A690 at 50 mph. If the car is in B, the cruise will hold 50 no problem, if the car is in D, the gradient is too steep and the car begins to accelerate because it cannot apply enough regen.

On the plus side, you can freely switch between these settings without tripping the cruise off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I need to clarify, as it's obvious I did not explain fully. This is all about conservation of momentum, the #1 principle in energy efficient driving (EV or ICE).

First, the ACC has limited data and in several scenarios it wastes momentum. Whereas a human driver can (not everyone does!) read the road in advance and make decisions to conserve momentum.

So, for example, when a car in front of you indicates because it is about to turn left, you see this long before the ACC notices the car slowing. If you leave ACC to do its work, it will slow down gently, according to your preset gap setting. then add more regen. But then it will 'panic' at the last moment: just as it notices that car's forward speed has slowed to near zero (that is, zero MPH in your direction of travel because it's now turning at almost 90 degrees). So the ACC applies very strong braking, bringing your car almost to a stop. This is annoying, but worse than that, it's a big surprise to the vehicle travelling behind you, who thinks you're a newbie driver who failed to anticipate. Now that the path in front of you is clear, it will take unnecessary time and energy for your car to get back to cruise speed.

I can manage this by setting the regen level to zero before setting ACC. Then when I see the above scenario, I cancel ACC immediately (bottom button press) which drops into coasting mode. When I need some regen, I can use the paddles to get as much or as little as I want. And when the car ahead has finished turning off of the road, I press Resume and the ACC takes over again. It works fine and conserves momentum. ACC's normal use of regen braking works fine, too.

The same sort of anticipation (or lack of it), happens in other common driving situations, too.

(FWIW, I have now changed the default regen setting, but cannot set it to zero, just Level 1.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
^ And to clarify the clarification (!) - the behaviour I want is available. It's in the Ioniq already - there's no 'certified' stuff needed. But only if you remember to change the regen level before setting the ACC. Then you can decide how and when you get regen when dropping out of cruise.

(Once you are cruising, pressing the paddle just brings up a 'no can do' message. My guess is that Hyundai does this so that people don't get the false impression that they can change the regen behaviour of ACC's own decision making.)
 

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Thanks for these last two posts - your description is exact the solution that I’ve come to. At the start I wasn’t great at doing it, but now it’s second nature. Gives a smoother ride, in my opinion, too.
 

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I have a Kona currently, but noticed the same thing OP, and it has annoyed me too. If you enter a phase of ACC driving after being in, say, regen level 3 for a while, perhaps after descending a hill or negotiating a winding road, and don’t remember to first change regen to a lower level, then, when you eventually cancel ACC, you have to remember to apply some accelerator pressure when cancelling in order to ‘catch’ or soften the strong regen effect which can otherwise be fairly unpleasant. It’d be more elegant if the car allowed you to alter the regen level preemptively, even when ACC was active.
 

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I agree with all your points @goldtop. To be fair to the Ioniq, the handling of slowing traffic (indeed it sometimes detects cyclists and even pedestrians) is an issue specific to radar controlled cruise rather to the Ioniq specifically. I drive in the same way I always have, cruise on as much as possible to ensure I don't accidentally speed and disable it when I can see the need to coast up to traffic or junctions or cyclists nearby that might cause it to hit the anchors unexpectedly. Overall I prefer the experience of smart cruise versus normal cruise control and just, as you have, work around the pitfalls.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I agree, Chris. The Ioniq's ACC is a revelation after my last cars (Lexus LS400 and RX400h). It's fantastic that it works so well, and I sort of expect it to make every decision perfectly, and - of course - it can't.

I need to develop a little 'pre-flight routine':
  1. press Start
  2. turn LKAS off
  3. turn regen to zero
  4. press D
 

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Enable parking sensors to prevent forward crashes, press EV to see battery percentage (in 28 models), doors to automatic and cross-check...
 
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