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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As EV batteries taper the charge it takes roughly as long to go from 80-100 % as nil (flat) to 80%.
But as nobody arrives intentionally at a charger totally flat it can actually take longer to go from 80-100% than to get to 80% in the real world.

I recall the shock when Nissan started throttling their new rapid chargers to 80% Max and the relief when we discovered it can be got around (requiring you to return to the car and restart, previously unnecessary).

However If paying is going to be purely based on time connected and costs get anywhere near approaching fueling an ICE as Chargemaster are intent on introducing then, in attempting to make EV operational financial maths stack up, there will be an effect of reducing our range to minimise costs i.e avoidance of the tapered charge end period.

When you allow for the charge needed to arrive to be comfortable with say 10%, that would mean our new max useable charge being reduced to 70% with an associated 70% range to repeat the process on any longer journeys.

The current 62 miles you get on motorways if you are lucky in the case of a Leaf is already half of the 124 Nissan continue to claim. So at 70% economy range 49.6 miles becomes the new real affordable motorway range but that's only if you are prepared to run it to turtle and that will still cost you £7.00 or £14 if you are connected for over half an hour. (buys 50-100 miles respectively in our diesel). I wonder how many would have bought their EV had they known there would be a powerful financial incentive to only use 70% of the cars actual real world range during a journey. Oh and if you aim to arrive with 10% spare the Leaf's new economy range is now 43.4 miles! Less if it is windy or raining or especially cold due to heater consumption (another 5-10 miles lost in a Gen1!), fortunately, in Chargemaster's logic speak, those things never happen here in Britain.:eek:
 

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Yep, we've been through this here quite a lot as it has all kinds of stupid implications to charge by time, not energy, and the charge rate is one of the key factors when it comes to rapids. Stupid.
 

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And my car doesn't have the range of a Leaf, so from 80% down to 10% in a C-Zero at a speed that is sensible on a motorway (60 mph) I would expect perhaps 35 miles. This not only means £7 per 35 miles, but there are very few places where the rapid chargers are close enough together to make a decent journey without a) crawling slowly behind lorries and b) risking a flatbed.
 

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Im hoping the model E gives us the 200miles range we need and im hoping it will be cheap.
I just need enough to drive 80 miles to my girlfriends house and back with out charging
 

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People are saying on the web its will be $35k and thats about £21k here that would be that best selling car of all time I think.
 

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30k is a bit high maybe £25 with the 5k grant.
even if it was £25k im not sure I could afford that.
The US prise of the base Model S (excluding incentives) is $63,570 and the base Model S in the UK before incentives is £55,280 - that gives a conversion rate of £0.87 per $ making a US $35,000 about £30,500. If you then take off the £5k grant that would be £25,500.

However, the Model E probably won't arrive in the UK no earlier than 2017 and there is no guarantee there will still be a £5k grant by then. Also, there are two things that could allow the $35k figure to rise without Tesla "losing face" - firstly it could of course be higher, but yet be claimed to be "the same as $35k in 2014" due to inflation. Secondly, does the claim of a $35k Model E mean $35k before or after US incentives? If after incentives it could be well over $40k.
 
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