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Hi all,

I've been trawlling through all of the GTE threads to get as much information as possible. I'm really keen on the new Golf GTE advance, looks fun to drive love the idea of the re-gen braking & my missus had a VW which is great.

My commute is 12 miles of stop & start & b-road. I have an ecotricity charger 20 yards from my flat & can potentially can charge at work.

Although my head can be turned, I could get a golf or A3 for 10k cheaper. Some advice would be greatly appreciated, does owning a GTE in running costs bridge the higher ticket prices & is the servicing affordable. Any advice would be welcomed.
 

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If you can charge at home and work, then a GTE would cover your 24 mile round trip commute 100% electric even in winter.

Downsides? Servicing is every 10k miles, circa £180 even for just the oil service.

The Ecotricity Charger near your house, is that a rapid or 7kw point? You would be spending a lot charging it on an ET rapid as the GTE only charges at 3.6kw, and besides you shouldn't hog a rapid on a slow charge EV.
 

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+1 on checking that Ecotricity charge point, unless it's cheap to use >and< you are happy to nip over there at 10pm or 4am in your slippers - 20yds is impressive !
If it's a second car you might want to check a secondhand eGolf ?!


Also check the lease deals and the mileage allowance, 8k miles soon goes ( especially as you'll love driving it )
 

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does owning a GTE in running costs bridge the higher ticket prices
In short no, especially if you are buying new. With the mileage you are doing you couldn't hope to make up the difference in cost of the car with economies due to lower fuel consumption and lower cost of electricity. It only starts to make purely economic sense if you are a company car driver who gets lower benefit in kind or are self-employed and can reduce your tax bill. The same is true incidentally with the Bluemotion spec Golf vs standard diesel. The premium cost is not made up for by the marginal improvement in fuel economy.

If the above does not apply try to buy second hand as the car will have taken the biggest depreciation hit already. BEVs can be especially competitive second hand and with the greater mileage you would not need to charge every day and some would have the option to Rapid charge in a shorter time. If it is a second car that is what I would do. E-golfs are a good option if you can find one.

Saying that economy is not the only reason people buy a car. I really like the GTE, it suits what I want very well and I wanted a car that was a lot less polluting than my old diesel..
 

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A car is sometimes more than just the performance or economy.
Sometimes bought with the heart or the head.
We were a private purchase; so no tax dodges to gain. We were after something a little different, after having GTI's in the past that couldn't go past a petrol station without stopping to say hello. TDi Tiguan was approaching DPF troubles as our journey distances had reduced significantly. Dieselgate was around the corner.
The GTE to us was a toe in the water for experiencing EV motoring, reduced fuel costs as most miles are local and charged up for free or for very little from the grid thanks to our solar PV.
We've spent less than £300 in petrol over 10,800 miles from new, fast approaching 2 years old, and had plenty of fun when required at the same time of reduced emissions, no dreaded range worries; and no doubt has given confidence in the next car will be a pure EV.
 
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