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Discussion Starter #1
As I can charge to 100% overnight* via standard 3 pin socket, and won't be getting Economy 7, it seems to me that unless I need to charge fully from very low in 4-5 hours, which I don't foresee happening, having a home charger fitted doesn't benefit me.
Am I missing something ? It would of course mean I'll be using the granny lead all the time, but as long as I monitor the plug and socket to make sure it doesn't get warm, seems to me I can save a few hundred £? If it does seem to get warm I will of course then get one fitted.

* most days I expect to be half full at minimum to start with.
 

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Why is it safer (as long as the socket/ wiring can carry the current) ? Or is it that most ordinary sockets and wiring aren't up to it for extended periods ? The socket in question has been used to charge an EV before for hours at a time.

And, in what way is it "better"?

(Not trying to be argumentative, just asking)

Thing with economy 7 is, my "normal" electricity will then go up in price which will cancel out partially the saving. Someone I know with it reckons it saves him £100 a year. Can't be *rs*d with the faff for that.
 

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Economy 7 doesn't work for a lot of people, that's fair enough.

I don't know anything about the Soul, but in a lot of vehicles the on-board charger is less efficient at lower charge rates. Leaf is 90% efficient at 16A but only 80% at 10A. Zoe may be even worse.
 

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I've only ever used a granny charger at home, I even bought another one with an 8mtr lead so I could park either way round, if its completely empty it draws around 10amps but this ramps down during the charge cycle, all the myths around charging with a granny charger seem to revolve around using cheap plugs and sockets, I bought good quality ones and they barely get warm at all, monitored them with a laser thermometer and the temp increase was negligible. Have you seen the Rolec and CM Fast chargers that melt the internal components, there is good and bad with both methods, if charging with an EVSE was bad the car manufacturers wouldn't sell them.
 

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I worry about the fuse; it's the weakest link and would probably start getting hot at some point as it's not a robust item. Getting hot is it's reason to be.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well if a fuse blows i think id take that as a sign that I should get a "proper" charger fitted.
 

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Get a 7kW tethered charger, may as well get one when they are still subsidised. Much easier and you then have the ability for quick top-ups.
 

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1)evses are a lot more likely to fail if used regularly unlike a charge point.
2)replacing an evses will cost you 200-300 quid, as you won't have a backup could leave you totally stuck.
3)when you persuade one of your mates to get an ev they can pop around and borrow your charger while you use the spare evse.
4)A charger can be had for £100...and it seems you think £100 isn't much money.
5)although rare, there will be times when you need a small boost.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Is it really correct the EVSE is going to die if used every day ? If that's correct surely it's not of warrantable quality.
 

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Why is it safer (as long as the socket/ wiring can carry the current) ? Or is it that most ordinary sockets and wiring aren't up to it for extended periods ? The socket in question has been used to charge an EV before for hours at a time.
A dedicated charger will be on its own circuit, so there is no chance of accidentally exceeding the circuit's rating.
And, in what way is it "better"?
The charger circuit will have a higher capacity, allowing faster charging. Especially useful if e.g. at weekends you use the car in the morning then need a top-up charge before using it again in the afternoon.
Thing with economy 7 is, my "normal" electricity will then go up in price which will cancel out partially the saving. Someone I know with it reckons it saves him £100 a year. Can't be *rs*d with the faff for that.
Do some logging of exactly how much electricity you currently use (i.e. daily meter readings). The premium rate for daytime may not be as bad as you think.
 

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my house already had a economy 7 meter when I moved in 20 years ago. (but no storage heaters)
we now have 2 plug-in cars, which are both charged on the cheap rate overnight.
when I renewed the 1 year fixed deal last year I worked it out, we are only saving a fiver a month on E7, so if there was a fee to change from singe rate to E7, it probably wouldn't be worth it.

My car gets plugged in every night, a 13 amp socket would be fine. but I found the "brick" and cable annoying when getting it out each evening, and putting it all away before driving off.
Especially on wet days.

She usually only plugs her Soul in two nights a week in summer, or 3 nights a week in winter.

If we had to pay the full £1,000 install price for a 32amp socket, I would have stuck with a decent 13amp socket for my PHEV, and probably made her use a 13amp socket too.
but since the government are currently willing to subsidise it down to only £149, with a 3 year warranty, for a 32amp socket, we had two.

both of us have the "brick" and a 13amp socket as a "plan B".
what is your "plan B" if some trips over the wire to your EVSE and it then stops working?
or something inside breaks with all that getting it out and putting it away so many times?
 

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All good points. I had a 3 pin socket fitted with a 32 amp dedicated circuit when they put the Solar panels in just before our Soul EV arrive. We plug in just over once a week, but it is a pain getting the granny lead out of the boot. We're waiting for the Zappi charger and will have one of those fitted on another 32 amp circuit, to give some redundancy. We'll then be able to charge purely from solar when it's sunny.
We're on Green Energy's TIDE tariff, with 3 different rates during the day. That's working well for us as we do washing, drying, dishwashing, boil the urn, charge the car all at night. At <5p/unit. Then the solar panels help during the day when it's expensive.
Could still do with a house battery - or a Vehicle to Grid system would be even better.
 

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... but it is a pain getting the granny lead out of the boot...
Why are you putting the granny lead in the boot? How often have you had to use it when on the road? - most rapid chargers have tethered leads anyway. Mine only gets loaded up when I am going on a road trip.
 

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Why are you putting the granny lead in the boot? How often have you had to use it when on the road? - most rapid chargers have tethered leads anyway. Mine only gets loaded up when I am going on a road trip.
Maybe you are young and have a good memory. I would forget especially as Ampera one is supposed to be hidden under floor of boot. I did once when we had rented house and using it in garage. Hence I now always leave in car.

In UK the granny is handy for backup if my proper tethered charger fails.

In Florida we only have Tesla UMC on a 50A socket at home, but only use occasionally as we are only 5 miles from SC.
 

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Why are you putting the granny lead in the boot?
Well it tried balancing on the boot and it kept falling off when I drove away.;) More seriously, I've never used it since I had a 32A charger fitted at home, but if it wasn't in the boot I'd forget where it was. The granny charger and an extension lead are stashed away as insurance in case Plan A and B fail.
 
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