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Discussion Starter #1
Now we are getting a few more EVs on the road... OK, not many but it is a few more than say a year ago... some people are finding that popular charging stations are sometimes already occupied by another EV that is plugged in. What do we do? If we think it is fully charged can we just unplug it?

It is a topic of confusion right now. I think this is a case of common sense must prevail here. If I am certain the car has stopped charging then I might unplug if the cable will reach to my car and I know it will not inconvenience the other driver in any way but I would always be cautious.

Ideally the other driver will have left their mobile number on their dash and I could give them a quick call.

How about us leaving our mobile number on our dash if we leave our car charging? Just a thought.
 

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Re: Is it ever OK to unplug another EV if you think it is fu

All good "stuff" but if you unplug the cord from an Ampera the alarm will activate (assuming the car is locked) and if you unplug the cable from the charge post end another warning will sound. I've done both by mistake and learned by surprise!!!

i'd probably leave well alone whatever other EV was connected but full for fear of something similar or worse happening.

I think the idea of leaving a mobile number on display is very good though.

Big Paul
 

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Militant EV driver!
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Re: Is it ever OK to unplug another EV if you think it is fu

I've had what I thought might be an EV driver unplug me, but I was only 3/4 full. Also, if you unplug a car on a POLAR post you need to swipe the original card to restart charging afterwards.

If the power on a POLAR post goes off, your Type 2 cable is unlocked and vulnerable to theft. Worth putting a padlock in it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Re: Is it ever OK to unplug another EV if you think it is fu

The Ampera alarm only goes off if it is activated... mine isn't. Unplugging at the other end has never set off any kind of alarm for me and if it is a type 2 socket or a public 13A socket such as Polar you couldn't unplug that anyway as it will be locked and only possible to unplug with the card that unlocked it in the first place.

So there are many EVs that don't have unplug alarms... the Leaf being one. If that was plugged in at a ZCW 13A charge station then it could be unplugged at either end without any alarm going off so the question is relevent but just not applicable to all cars or all charging stations. :)

I too would probably also leave alone unless I was desparate to get charged (i.e. fast charging a Leaf) then I might unplug.
 

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Re: Is it ever OK to unplug another EV if you think it is fu

Paul Churchley said:
Unplugging at the other end has never set off any kind of alarm for me
Alert on power loss in an option.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Re: Is it ever OK to unplug another EV if you think it is fu

Parax said:
Alert on power loss in an option.
Yes, Thanks. I have turned mine off because I like to unplug at the car end if I am charging at home. The alarm kept going off!!!
 

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Re: Is it ever OK to unplug another EV if you think it is fu

Also if the charge post trips out for whatever reason, the doors release and your cable is vulnerable to theft.
 

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Not necessary .. Eg on double headed Ecotricity ac/dc rapids once one side is finished eg DC it can be left plugged in, and car untouched and the other side works fine....

But not OK to hog the parking slot once full.

( yesterday at IKEA Southampton on AC side)
 

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Well I never knew that. Thanks.
Clarification:
The leaf (Gen 2 onwards) can lock the J1172 socket in one of three options: Never lock, Lock during charge, and Lock always. Gen 1 Leafs can't lock the J1172 socket.
This control has no effect over the locking of the Chademo connector, which is controlled entirely by the rapid charger. (You can't unplug it while current is flowing, this applies to both type of the official Yazaki Chademo connectors, and the Siemens Chademo connectors). Some DBT chargers are configured to allow Chademo rapid charging to stop without authentication when the charge rate slows to a preset level (ie. when it's nearly finished).
 

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Legally are you allowed to unplug someone who's finished? Is it classed as interfering with the car? Legally.
 

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As long as you don't damage the car deliberately it wouldn't be a crime, but you might be liable for civil penalties. Say you accidentally damaged something, or you screwed the driver so they had to waste valuable time later or ran out of charge.

I wouldn't do it unless the charge had finished.
 

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Zoe Devotee
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Well the plug goes into someone car, so removing the cables means pulling the plug out of their car, at which point you are in effect tampering with their car. Seems pretty clear on police website that tampering with a car is illegal.

But then the toss is argued here and usually results in someone saying pulling the plug out a car is not the same as tampering with brakes. I get bored round about then.
 
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"Someone on Speak EV said I could do it your honour."
Unless someone on here is willing to give me free legal reprepresentation. I'll leave well alone.
I have done it and all was OK. I'll not do it again as I was very uncomfortable.
 

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I did dig out the two specific offences which refer to tampering with a car, in the other thread where someone tried to maliciously remove a plug from a car.

Milton Keynes muppet

"I would need a lawyer to rule on whether RTA 1988 S25 applies - I believe not as it refers to tampering with brakes specifically. However, they might also be liable for "interfering with a motor vehicle" Criminal Attempts 1981 S126. Although proving intent to theft would be a challenge, it is obvious that a prerequisite of taking the car is disconnecting it from the charging point therefore, as whether to charge with the S126 offence is determined on balance of probabilities,"

Sandy's comment about "it's not the brakes" is interesting since the Act specifically refers to brakes. Tampering with someone's windscreen wipers doesn't count. The other Act (Criminal Attempts) refers to attempting to steal a motor vehicle, which clearly would not apply if you are sitting in your own car.

Now, I don't really fancy touching someone's cable either as there are too many weird, stupid and money-grabbing people around these days.

But if you did feel like talking to a lawyer, I'd start with the above two Acts.
 

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As I have said before. If a car has finished charging and unattended I will unplug it. If you don't like it, don't leave your car unattended on a rapid charger. I'm pretty capable of removing a plug without damaging anything. I also think it's a bad idea to leave flaps and charge ports open. If you're going to unplug someone at least have the decency to close up the ports.

Charging spaces not parking spaces (Rapids)
 
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