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Discussion Starter #1
A picture of the rating label on the 2020 10.5kW charger from a car in the Netherlands has been posted here -


From this, it appears that this is a higher-powered single-phase unit with 50A input, NOT the 3-phase unit that was widely assumed when Hyundai announced it :
 

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Very strange. I've not heard of these units in the UK - are they something that is available on the continent?
 

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If it were 3-phase, it would spec more than 285VAC on the input as 230V 3-phase is 415V phase-to-phase.
True if it's a simple delta connected bridge rectifier.
However, as it must also contain some voltage multiplication I'd think that the spec plate shown is for the 'black box' and there are likely all sorts of individual (but integrated) sections inside. There may be a 16A input circuit for each phase so it's operating as a star connection.
Then again, it's only rated at 10.5kW, not 11. Are we sure that is in fact a 3-phase car. The 7kW single phase limit is on the supply side, what does the plate on a 18/19 car say?
 

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I don't think that the label necessarily precludes that it can handle "3-phase" power. Thinking out loud, in an overly simplistic design, imagine every pin L1, L2, L3 and N has one diode to the (+) and one diode from the (-) of the primary DC bus, any of which can handle 50 amps. Any potential present between any pins can contribute power. But a proper 3-phase source with 120° phase angle is not explicitly required and all 50 amps can be on any one pair of pins or any combination of pins. Does that make any sense?

 

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Discussion Starter #8
From the pics the OP just posted, it appears that it probably is 3-phase, as it has all the connector pins populated - just the OBC label is a bit misleading
 
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