Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just catching up on all the things EV on this forum. We bought our Zoe (R240, 22kwh) just last week so are very much newbies in this space. The Zoe is brilliant for scooting around town (Perth). Recharging has been done either at one of the ChargePlace Scotland points in town or using a 'Granny Cable' which we bought on ebay. We're waiting to get a chargepoint installed at home. Driving the Zoe is a delight. Having had many automatic ICE cars it was easy to adapt to. This is one car where I use the speed limiter in town as it's way too easy to go beyond 30mph and 40mph without realising it.

The 'Whole New World' is the language and jargon of EV's. I've read the thread on 'Glossary' but there's probably a few more terms/acronyms that could be added. Maybe a sticky post of a FAQ/Glossary for Newbies could be made? I'll happily collaborate on this by asking the daft questions, if someone else can help with the answers :)

So far I've ascertained the following as being relevant and worth remembering: (some are obvious)
- SoH - State of Health (the health of the battery relative to 100% factory manufactured levels)
- SoC - State of Charge (the relative charge of the battery)
- GoM - Guessometer (the indication on the dashboard)
- ICE - Internal Combustion Engine
- EV - Electric Vehicle

One that's got me beat though is BSM. I'm thinking it's an update of some kind for the Zoe?

Anyone care to add some TLAs?

TIA :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Common Abbreviations/Glossary of Terms (taken from Leaf guide by
AC
Alternating current
Ampere (A)
(=Current) rate at which charge is moved in a circuit
BEV
Battery Powered Electric Vehicle
BMS
Battery Monitoring System
CPS
Charge Place Scotland, is also CYC
CYC
Charge your Car
D.C.
Direct Current
GOM
Guess-o-Meter
Granny charge/cable
Using a 3-pin domestic socket to charge your car (2.4kW A.C.)
HP
Hired Purchase
ICC
Intelligent Cruise Control (Adaptive Cruise Control in UK)- allows your car to match speed with the traffic in front- slows if the vehicle in front slows, gains speed up to pre-set value as long as sufficient distance is maintained between you and the vehicle in front (bikes included)
ICE
Internal Combustion Engine
ICED
Charging bay occupied by an ICE vehicle
kW
KiloWatt refers to power i.e. voltage (V) multiplied by ampere (A)
kWh
Refers to battery capacity; 1kWh= ability to provide 1kW power for 1 hour
LKA
Lane Keep Assist- your car controls the steering wheel for you to keep you in lane
PCP
Personal Contract Purchase
PHEV
Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle
Pro-Pilot
Include Lane Keep Assist (LKA), Intelligent Cruise Control (ICC), and Traffic Jam Pilot (TJP) technologies in one (Nissan).
Quick Charge
7kW AC Charge
Rapid Charge
50kW DC Charge
Slow Charge
3kW AC Charge
SOC
State of Charge (how much battery you have left in %)
SOH
State of health of your battery versus brand new. Capacity for it to reach full charge
TACC
Traffic Aware Cruise Control (Tesla Autopilot)
TJP
Traffic Jam Pilot- you can still have pro-pilot on in traffic, either gently press the accelerator pedal or press the (RES+) button on the steering wheel
VIN
Vehicle Identification Number
Voltage (V)
Difference in electric potential between two points
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,455 Posts
@Mal_NW Some minor corrections to your acronyms (some may be considered pedantic!):

AC, DC - no full stops.
HP - Hire Purchase, not Hired.

KW - it's kW (lower case 'k') and voltage V multiplied by current (A) gives Watts, not kiloWatts. If it's AC then it also has to be multiplied by the power factor, which is often less than 1. But then with AC we get into all sorts of complications like RMS (root mean square) values.

(If you want the whole story about RMS, including mind-boggling equations, take a look here :D)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
@Mal_NW Some minor corrections to your acronyms (some may be considered pedantic!):

AC, DC - no full stops.
HP - Hire Purchase, not Hired.

KW - it's kW (lower case 'k') and voltage V multiplied by current (A) gives Watts, not kiloWatts. If it's AC then it also has to be multiplied by the power factor, which is often less than 1. But then with AC we get into all sorts of complications like RMS (root mean square) values.

(If you want the whole story about RMS, including mind-boggling equations, take a look here :D)
I am aware of the proper abbreviations as I work in electricity industry but I coped and pasted these so didn't check them.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top