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proper charger otherwise BMW wouldn't supply it with the car
Semantics but my opinion is that they are provided for occasional charging. Great you are happy with your arrangement and I am sure you are enjoying the i3.
 

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Thanks for the reply, my car should be arriving next week,my dads an electrician so fitting it wouldn't be an issue. I'm all new to world of EV,I was planning on just using the standard charging method that comes with the leaf. Do I really need a different method of charging etc? For me to go with a company they will be charging more than the £300 mark due to it being away from my house and not being a "standard" installation
Mate, pay the £300, because then if anything goes wrong you have someone else to blame and sue. Having a house burn down is expensive.
 

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Mate, pay the £300, because then if anything goes wrong you have someone else to blame and sue. Having a house burn down is expensive.
Graham, you realise this thread is from two years ago?
 

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I think this is a fair point probably worth discussing in more detail though - granny charging vs having a chargepoint installed.

For EV owners who are renting a house with a driveway or garage, granny charging overnight is the realistic option. You only get one EV grant - no way would I use it to install a charger in a house I might only be living in for the next 6-12 months.

Homeowners, of course a proper charger is the right choice - but if you're renting, granny charging is far more palatable than public charging!

Besides, when do you ever need to charge at more than 3kw at home anyway?

Even with the big battery EVs, you'll rarely be charging 0-100% overnight. 3kw charging combined with "normal" usage of less than 22kwh/day EVERY DAY will see you back at 100% SOC after a few days anyway :)
 

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Besides, when do you ever need to charge at more than 3kw at home anyway?
10A is around 2.5kW. If you get home from work with a low charge and need to go out later, it is difficult to gain much charge per hour, which isn't a show stopper with a PHEV but could be for a BEV driver.

I used my Ampera with the granny charger when we had a rented home, but it isn't really viable for a lot of BEV owners. I wouldn't have got my Zoe without 32A home charging. At next home I would like to have 3 phase 22kW ;)
 

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@ proddick - Except that most BEVs have at least an 80 mile real-world range per charge and the average daily UK car mileage is only 20 miles. So 'most' car drivers would still have ample charge to go out in the evening without having to charge. Where we *really* need public money being spent on charging facilities is in every petrol station in the land - 22kW ones would do. Then you can stop off for 10 mins and dump 20 miles or so of emergency range in only a few minutes. But HMG insists on wasting public money on home charging points instead and making their golfing buddies outrageuosly rich on the back of it. If you can afford to spend £30k on a new EV, you can afford £400 to get your own charging point fitted.

As for PiHs Vs EVs, don't get me started. More wasted public money propping up a dying industry to keep Big Auto happy when the money should be being spent on encouraging ICEV drivers to give up their comfort blankets and buy a *real* EV that actually does something positive to improve air quality (and maybe help combat global warming, too). You do know that hardly *any* PiHs are plugged in, don't you? In which case, they are simply slightly more efficient, but only marginally less polluting, ICEVs! You are simply being duped.
 

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@ proddick - Except that most BEVs have at least an 80 mile real-world range per charge and the average daily UK car mileage is only 20 miles. So 'most' car drivers would still have ample charge to go out in the evening without having to charge. Where we *really* need public money being spent on charging facilities is in every petrol station in the land - 22kW ones would do. Then you can stop off for 10 mins and dump 20 miles or so of emergency range in only a few minutes. But HMG insists on wasting public money on home charging points instead and making their golfing buddies outrageuosly rich on the back of it. If you can afford to spend £30k on a new EV, you can afford £400 to get your own charging point fitted.

As for PiHs Vs EVs, don't get me started. More wasted public money propping up a dying industry to keep Big Auto happy when the money should be being spent on encouraging ICEV drivers to give up their comfort blankets and buy a *real* EV that actually does something positive to improve air quality (and maybe help combat global warming, too). You do know that hardly *any* PiHs are plugged in, don't you? In which case, they are simply slightly more efficient, but only marginally less polluting, ICEVs! You are simply being duped.
 

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The Plug-in Hybrid vs BEV point is worthy of further discussion, IMHO. I was a relatively early adopter, buying a new Prius hybrid in 2005, which I kept for three years and 60k miles. I bought another Prius Hybrid after that, as BEVs weren't then viable. The next car was a Prius Plug-in hybrid, it fitted my 16 mile each way commute, with charging both ends, very well. Over the nearly five years I owned it most of my driving was in EV mode, with the ICE being used in winter to heat the car and cover maybe 30% of the distance, and often the ICE only being used for less than 20% of my driving overall.

I've recently swapped the Prius Plug-in for a BMW i3, primarily because my confidence in the capability of driving under battery power has been gained from my experience driving the Prius. Another key point is that, because the Prius drive train is very like a BEV, I became addicted to a car with no gearbox or gear changes, just a "push to go" pedal. Whenever any of the Prius's were in for a service, and I had a conventional ICE loan car, the feeling of just what dinosaurs they are was quickly reinforced.

As a way of educating cautious drivers as to what electric driving is really like, then I think that Plug-in hybrids play a key role. I'd not have taken the jump to buying the i3 without the confidence gained from a couple of hundred thousand miles of hybrid and Plug-in hybrid driving over the space of nearly 13 years. My main concern is that Toyota seem to have walked away from the original concept of making all their cars zero emission, and instead have branched off into the very stupid "self-charging hybrid" nonsense; one reason I walked away from buying another Toyota, despite a fair bit of brand loyalty and having had excellent reliability and customer service over the years.

I see Plug-in hybrids as an essential stepping stone between ICE vehicles and BEVs, and without them I suspect it will be harder to convince people just how capable BEVs can be, and just how much of their everyday driving easily fits within a home-only charging regime.
 

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Depending on how you drive, many PHEVs are LESS fuel efficient than their ICE equivalents because when battery is flat the ICE has to carry an extra 400kg of dead weight around.
@ proddick - Except that most BEVs have at least an 80 mile real-world range per charge and the average daily UK car mileage is only 20 miles. So 'most' car drivers would still have ample charge to go out in the evening without having to charge. Where we *really* need public money being spent on charging facilities is in every petrol station in the land - 22kW ones would do. Then you can stop off for 10 mins and dump 20 miles or so of emergency range in only a few minutes. But HMG insists on wasting public money on home charging points instead and making their golfing buddies outrageuosly rich on the back of it. If you can afford to spend £30k on a new EV, you can afford £400 to get your own charging point fitted.

As for PiHs Vs EVs, don't get me started. More wasted public money propping up a dying industry to keep Big Auto happy when the money should be being spent on encouraging ICEV drivers to give up their comfort blankets and buy a *real* EV that actually does something positive to improve air quality (and maybe help combat global warming, too). You do know that hardly *any* PiHs are plugged in, don't you? In which case, they are simply slightly more efficient, but only marginally less polluting, ICEVs! You are simply being duped.
u
 

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Depending on how you drive, many PHEVs are LESS fuel efficient than their ICE equivalents because when battery is flat the ICE has to carry an extra 400kg of dead weight around.

u
All I can quote is my experience from nearly 5 years of PHEV ownership and about 48,000 miles of driving one. During the summer, my average fuel consumption was around 160 to 165mpg, during winter that dropped to around 110 to 115mpg. This was a consistent pattern over the whole time I owned the car, so is pretty representative.

On long journeys, when EV mileage was severely limited, the car would average between 60 and 65 mpg, pretty much identical to the 2010 non-PHEV Prius I'd owned immediately before. I couldn't spot any disadvantage at all with the PHEV version, if anything it's normal hybrid mode seemed to cycle the ICE on and off a bit less frequently, and the fuel consumption seemed exactly the same as the normal hybrid version on long journeys.

Clearly it depends very much on both the pattern of usage and the ability, and willingness of the owner, to charge, but my weekday commute wasn't untypical; 16 miles each way on a mix of rural A and B roads. I could charge at both ends, which was useful, but easy to arrange, as the charge rate of the car is only around 2.5 kW maximum, and takes less than 2 hours to charge. Even when away on holiday I was always able to charge overnight one way or another, meaning that once at our destination much of the local driving was in EV mode.

I know it's fashionable here to be disparaging about PHEVs and their owners, but just how many of their critics here actually have long term ownership experience with one?
 

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The Prius is one of the few hybrids that have an engine that has truely been designed to work as well as possible in a hybrid.
 

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As for PiHs Vs EVs, don't get me started. More wasted public money propping up a dying industry to keep Big Auto happy when the money should be being spent on encouraging ICEV drivers to give up their comfort blankets and buy a *real* EV that actually does something positive to improve air quality (and maybe help combat global warming, too). You do know that hardly *any* PiHs are plugged in, don't you? In which case, they are simply slightly more efficient, but only marginally less polluting, ICEVs! You are simply being duped.
I see a lot of dislike for PHEVs on this forum which is sad. PHEVs can work well for many users and are a good gateway drug to the world of EVs.

I have a Golf GTE and I use it on pure EV about 90-95% of the time. (My last week of driving - 98% EV). It's a good vehicle for me, because it was pretty cheap (~£16k) for a vehicle that I can mostly use for electric driving, but lets me go long distances without worrying too much about charging every 70 or so miles.

My work commute is now fully electric, and my employer has installed charging spots because I bought this vehicle, so I can charge for my commute home as well. My boss is now looking into EVs after seeing how easy and cheap mine is to run, and is currently deciding between an i3 or Model S. Without the PHEV GTE, this may never have happened.

Yes, many PHEVs aren't ever plugged in because of the company car tax benefits. Blame the government, not PHEV drivers like me. Though an obvious benefit is the influx of cheap, 2/3 year old PHEVs!

My next vehicle will almost certainly be a full EV, the GTE has been an excellent taster and given me appreciation for how much driving I can do on EV. It's almost disappointing to use the engine now, though I do go on the odd 200-mile trip that makes that necessary, I still arrange charging at both ends to maximise efficiency. I generally get 50+ mpg on these trips, but for my typical city driving I get 250-300 mpg in a week.
 
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