Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Correct me if I'm wrong, but it's not possible to keep track of charges within the infotainment system, right?

I was expecting to find a menu with a record of charges with info such as how long did they last, how many kW were charged or the charging speed... but didn't find anything. This info isn't available, is it?

How do you keep track of this info?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,456 Posts
Much the same way I did with a petrol car years ago, if it’s a bit empty I fill it up. It’s so cheap to fill at home it’s not worth worrying about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Such info can be accessed via diagnostic port using obd2 adapter, but car must be powered on (before/after or while charging).

Parameters in Car Scanner Elm Obd2 app:

Screenshot_20210501-085929.jpg
Screenshot_20210501-090416.jpg
Screenshot_20210501-090436.jpg
 

·
Registered
Kia E Niro 4
Joined
·
196 Posts
I've always kept a notebook in my cars with date milometer reading, gallons, price. Any drops in mpg could then be investigated and tackle problems before coming serious. I intend to continue this method of monitoring in the E-Niro, ie date, % start, milometer, GOM range, current miles/kwh ( I keep the continuous one and intend to reset at each service, much as I did with my last car) length of charge, % finish, New GOM range, cost.

Perhaps I'm OCD, or just a statistics nerd :ROFLMAO:
 

·
Registered
Kia Eniro 4+
Joined
·
327 Posts
Artyman, you’re certainly something!! ;)

Best of luck to those who want to do all that but I’m with Edd. When it gets to 40% it gets plugged in!
Plugged in now ready to go at 9.30 at 44%. Octopus Go Faster 5 hours.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,456 Posts
I've always kept a notebook in my cars with date milometer reading, gallons, price. Any drops in mpg could then be investigated and tackle problems before coming serious. I intend to continue this method of monitoring in the E-Niro, ie date, % start, milometer, GOM range, current miles/kwh ( I keep the continuous one and intend to reset at each service, much as I did with my last car) length of charge, % finish, New GOM range, cost.

Perhaps I'm OCD, or just a statistics nerd :ROFLMAO:
Is this your first EV?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
I've always kept a notebook in my cars with date milometer reading, gallons, price. Any drops in mpg could then be investigated and tackle problems before coming serious. I intend to continue this method of monitoring in the E-Niro, ie date, % start, milometer, GOM range, current miles/kwh ( I keep the continuous one and intend to reset at each service, much as I did with my last car) length of charge, % finish, New GOM range, cost.

Perhaps I'm OCD, or just a statistics nerd :ROFLMAO:
#meetoo...I do the same thing....but by a modern method....a spreadsheet 😊.

It's on my Google drive so I can access anywhere (almost).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,456 Posts
Ok, you will find that your fuel economy is much much more variable than a petrol car. A charge that is consumed by short trips in winter will be half the fuel economy (let’s say 2 miles per kWh) compared to a charge consumed by a long, low speed, rural drive in mid summer, think 4-5 miles per kWh. Thats not a fault of the car, it’s just how they all are. And of course, any long trips you’ll end up using rapid chargers, which may or may not tell you how many kWh they have delivered, and if they do it’s at the DC level, ignoring any loss as it goes into the battery (heat, cooling system, ancillary electronics if you’re in the car with the heating or Aircon on etc), which is unlike anything your home charge point would report as that’s on the AC level, and the charger in your car is not 100% efficient (and if you’re operating it below 7kw, for instance using the portable EVSE) it can be extremely inefficient (perhaps as low as 70% if the Charging time estimate on the dashboard is to be believed)

Youll probably also find you charge a lot more often than you would fill up with petrol, since just plugging it in is very low effort, and it’s nice to know you have a full “tank”, so you’d be fiddling around with the data allllll the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
I've always kept a notebook in my cars with date milometer reading, gallons, price. Any drops in mpg could then be investigated and tackle problems before coming serious. I intend to continue this method of monitoring in the E-Niro, ie date, % start, milometer, GOM range, current miles/kwh ( I keep the continuous one and intend to reset at each service, much as I did with my last car) length of charge, % finish, New GOM range, cost.

Perhaps I'm OCD, or just a statistics nerd :ROFLMAO:
Snap. I've been using Soul EV Spy (paid version) with an OBD dongle. This saves all the readings on exit. They include cumulative charge kWh since new (and cumulative discharge kWh) from which you can calculate, from before and after figures, the kWh fed to battery for any charge session. Being particularly nerdy I keep a record of a) kWh ex charger/mains (paid for), b) kWh to battery and c) kWh actually added to battery (where a > b >c). Between 100% charges (e.g. monthly), the manual calculation confirms the car's own reported miles/kWh figure, albeit that the car rounds down to one decimal place.
Be aware that the charge % reflects Ah not kWh and the kWh have to be estimated depending on voltage (also reported through OBD). There's a lot more energy in the higher percentages than at the lower end of the scale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
Ok, you will find that your fuel economy is much much more variable than a petrol car. A charge that is consumed by short trips in winter will be half the fuel economy (let’s say 2 miles per kWh) compared to a charge consumed by a long, low speed, rural drive in mid summer, think 4-5 miles per kWh. Thats not a fault of the car, it’s just how they all are. And of course, any long trips you’ll end up using rapid chargers, which may or may not tell you how many kWh they have delivered, and if they do it’s at the DC level, ignoring any loss as it goes into the battery (heat, cooling system, ancillary electronics if you’re in the car with the heating or Aircon on etc), which is unlike anything your home charge point would report as that’s on the AC level, and the charger in your car is not 100% efficient (and if you’re operating it below 7kw, for instance using the portable EVSE) it can be extremely inefficient (perhaps as low as 70% if the Charging time estimate on the dashboard is to be believed)

Youll probably also find you charge a lot more often than you would fill up with petrol, since just plugging it in is very low effort, and it’s nice to know you have a full “tank”, so you’d be fiddling around with the data allllll the time.
Yes, the granny lead charging loss is typically 25%-ish, whereas with 7.2kW home charging and with rapid DC charging, you get about 85% of what you pay for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Interestingly, I discovered that the e-niro granny charger uses power even when not connected to the car.🤔

I have it supplied through a plug-in energy monitor so that I can log my charges on a spreadsheet.

With my previous EV I left the granny charger plugged into the household socket all the time and just plugged the cable into the car when needing to charge. There was no power usage when not plugged into the car.

Over a 24 hour period the power consumption meter showed 0.17kW consumption.😳

I now switch off the supply at the wall when not charging, but this means losing the cumulative reading🥴

144405


144404
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
Consumption is measured in kWh, not kW. Did it use 0.17kWh in a day or is it constantly drawing 0.17kW? The former would mean it's drawing 7W, which is a lot for doing nothing but not crazy. The latter would be insane.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Consumption is measured in kWh, not kW. Did it use 0.17kWh in a day or is it constantly drawing 0.17kW? The former would mean it's drawing 7W, which is a lot for doing nothing but not crazy. The latter would be insane.
my error:rolleyes:.....it is 0.17kWh.

...would mean it's drawing 7W, which is a lot for doing nothing
Can I ask how you calculate that figure?

What is consuming that? Surely not the green led .... that would be crazy!
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top