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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A really interesting range test on a number of higher range (claimed) EV's. This should be useful for anybody considering purchasing an EV and who wants a long range model.
Although it came second best in range to the Tesla M3 Long Range, it achieved the nearest to the manufacturer's stated range (even though the temperature was below 11°C) at 90%. Also it was only 15 miles short of what the Tesla M3 LR actually achieved which is remarkable considering the Tesla cost £15K more (£16.5K more if you include the luxury VED charge)
 

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Watched this tonight too and thought exactly the same. Pathetic really how poorly the much more expensive competition does here. Would have been interesting if they had a Kona thrown in here too.
 

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Yep, I posted about this on Inside EVs earlier.

Niro did well!

Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
 

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Agreed, the e-Niro is the stand-out winner in the range stakes and is also the least expensive. Though it was a brutal test from the battery's point of view. I wouldn't want to do that to mine. Charge to 100%, leave it standing overnight and then deep discharge. Ouch.
 

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That is probably the best range comparison I've seen and makes WhatCars drive for 15 minutes and then extrapolate, range test look like the travesty it was.
Anyway getting back to the vid, they did a great job, adding some interest along the way.
Woudl be interesting to see a follow up where the cars charge more at leisure than last minute, and see how long they take to do, say a 200 mile each way trip.
 

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The other thing that always surprises me about these tests is how they never talk about efficiency, just range. The E-Niro spanked cars with closer to 90kw battery packs making it a hell of a lot cheaper to run and ultimately better for the environment too, especially if you don't have renewable supply at home.
 

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I watched that yesterday as well. It was really good. It is what a lot of folk want to know as genuine motorway speeds are the norm for most people not dawdling behind a truck at 55 with no heating on.

It was also interesting to see what happens when you charge to 100% the night before. Some had lost several % just over night. The Audi looked the worst for that.

I think the Leaf 60 was 208 miles from memory.

What did the IPace do? Did it get over 200? Forgotten already :rolleyes:
 

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I watched that yesterday as well. It was really good. It is what a lot of folk want to know as genuine motorway speeds are the norm for most people not dawdling behind a truck at 55 with no heating on.

It was also interesting to see what happens when you charge to 100% the night before. Some had lost several % just over night. The Audi looked the worst for that.

I think the Leaf 60 was 208 miles from memory.

What did the IPace do? Did it get over 200? Forgotten already :rolleyes:
It got 76% of its claimed range, travelling 223 miles.
 

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Looked at the specs for the new Niro and it doesn't seem to list blind spot warning or auto dimming mirrors. It's got everything else like auto full LED headlights. Knocks the Leaf 60 into a cocked hat for range and efficiency.
 

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I have to say I enjoyed some of the comments here:

It seems that they're only interested in the fact that the Model 3 had the greatest range, not that it was only getting 78% of it's claimed WLTP range compared to the e-Niro with 90%...
 

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Range per £1 of purchase cost would put Niro well ahead.

That's a shame. Wouldn't want to be without blind spot detection now.
Oh for sure, some of the more expensive brands should be embarrassed with how poorly the efficiency holds up. Sure it might accelerate faster or have more torque, but neither of those will get you to your destination if the battery runs out too fast!

I've only ever used Blind Sport detection in a hire car in the US (a fairly large beast) where I have to say I found it useful seeing as I was in an unfamiliar car on the wrong side of the road.
But I've never felt like I've needed it personally, RCTA on the other hand seems like something that would be really useful!
 

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Yes good test on range. Reinforced my buying criteria - if you want an EV that has a good range at a good price (by EV standards!), is comfortable and roomy, then the e-Niro is currently the best on the market.
 

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Yup. That video really reinforced my decision. Now I just have to finish working out how much complications have been added by my dealership going into administration
 

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I have to say I enjoyed some of the comments here:

It seems that they're only interested in the fact that the Model 3 had the greatest range, not that it was only getting 78% of it's claimed WLTP range compared to the e-Niro with 90%...
Not only that, the Tesla got a higher range than the Niro due to having a 75kWh battery vs 64kWh in the Niro. If you scaled the Tesla range down in proportional to battery size it would have only got 230 miles from a 64kWh battery or 25 miles less than the Niro. So the Niro was by far the most efficient of all of them, in 7C weather.

I can't help but think the lack of a heat pump disadvantaged the Tesla a little bit against the Nero in those weather conditions and it had to make it up through a bigger battery. The rest of the cars though, totally outclassed in range and efficiency by the Niro and Tesla.
 

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Not only that, the Tesla got a higher range than the Niro due to having a 75kWh battery vs 64kWh in the Niro. If you scaled the Tesla range down in proportional to battery size it would have only got 230 miles from a 64kWh battery or 25 miles less than the Niro. So the Niro was by far the most efficient of all of them, in 7C weather.

I can't help but think the lack of a heat pump disadvantaged the Tesla a little bit against the Nero in those weather conditions and it had to make it up through a bigger battery. The rest of the cars though, totally outclassed in range and efficiency by the Niro and Tesla.
Oh for sure, if you read through the comments on this video on various other sites (and even on the YouTube page) it does seem like a lot of people perceive the Tesla to be the winner, ignoring the efficiency stakes and battery sizes. And not to mention that the E-Niro and the Leaf are in a different price bracket to the Tesla.
Also there seems to be an argument that the Tesla would do better in warm weather (probably true, as you say it has no heat pump but does have a bigger battery) but you don't drive an EV in just warm weather (not in the UK anyway). It's great to see a video which shows a real world scenario under less than ideal conditions.

It would be interesting to watch this repeated in the summer!

There is also a consideration of charging speed, a model 3 will charge faster (providing a suitable supercharger is available on route) and therefore is arguably better for very long range trip, but then that wasn't the purpose of the exercise in the video, it was all about the single charge in which the E-Niro excelled!
 

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If they had used the M3 SR+ for the test, you would not have heard a squeak from the Tesla fan club...
Based on the 78% efficiency rating w.r.t. the WLTP results you'd assume a SR+ model would give approximately 197 miles.
Bit of a ball park figure admittedly as it doesn't account for the fact that the motor setup is different in the SR+ vs the LR or Performance models but it's hard to believe it would be far off.
 

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If I’m not mistaken, didn’t the Kia come off the motorway earlier than the Tesla?

Without knowing what speeds the Kia was doing from the point is stopped doing motorway speeds to the point at which it died, and what speeds the Tesla was doing, and for how far, when it remained on the motorway, and how far each was driven in circles around a car park, the test, in terms of being able to declare a clear 'winner' is petty pointless, IMO.

It’d be more accurate, and fairer, to take the distance travelled at the point they pulled off the motorway (or stopped doing motorway speeds), then take the remaining SoC and extrapolate a total motorway distance to 0% (or more realistically to 5%). And then, if you really wanted to, separately add on the distance able to be travelled by each at car parks speeds once the car reports 0% remaining.

Or, you could just drive the cars at 70mph around Millbrook or similar until they each die.

As it is, the test results are quite flawed.
 
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