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Discussion Starter #1
I've been trying to get to grips with the kickdown like response. By which I mean how to get max power to get a burst of acceleration eg when entering a busy roundabout, or when overtaking.
In a manual ICE I would work the clutch, change down, rev up and go for it; in an auto ICE I would expect to stab the accelerator to force the gearbox to change down and rev the engine to deliver the power needed. In the Prius I would stab the accelerator which would get the engine to deliver extra power to the hybrid drive box.

Has anyone here any tips on how to get similar performance from the Outlander PHEV in a predictable manner?

The user manual talks about using series mode for power, but when I kick the accelerator I get varied responses. Sometimes the engine delivers the additional power almost immediately, but other times it seems to take ages to fire up and deliver.
I have experimented with turning on the heating and/or flipping into battery charge mode, to warm up the engine before power is needed. This seems to improve the available power, but not its predictability.
Battery save mode might be worth thinking about, but it doesn't seem to automatically engage series mode, and if the generator is supplying power to the battery that could mean less power for the motors.
This has also got me thinking about the power output of the battery in EV mode and whether the software is limiting its delivery. Other EVs I have driven seem to have a much stronger response from a standstill, albeit that they are lighter and do not grip so well in the wet.
 

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Sorry I can't help...but lack of acceleration was one of the reasons I didn't go for the Outlander. I think the published 0-60 is about 11 secs so I just put it down to being a big ol' lump of car.
 

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Its a 5000lb vehicle with a 30 mile battery so probably won't be getting lightning acceleration of the sort a Leaf , Ampera, Zoe etc can achieve.
 
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Hmmmm, I have needed to get out 'quickly' and must say that it has been quick enough for me although think I was in series mode certainly in one situation. I usually wait for a big enough gap for the ol' lump to be honest!:p
 

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Well it's not the quickest thing on 4 wheels, but always been quick enough for me so far. Fwiw, in a What Car? group test against BMW X3, Audi Q5 and Volvo XC60 (all diesels), it posts roughly similar acceleration times (they measure 30-70, 30-50 and 50-70). Actually it's slightly quicker than the Audi and Volvo generally, and only marginally slower than the X3. They also give the actual 0-60 time as 9.4 seconds.
 

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The 0-62 quoted by Mitsubishi is 11.2 secs. I'm sure like all EVs it 'feels' faster because of the instant torque. I believe the petrol engine has to kick in under max acceleration and that very process itself is going to result in some lag.

The i3 gives you a full on EV grin, the Ampera a semi (grin that is ;)) but much less so on the Outlander. But that isn't what it's about...you're not buying one for racing fun. All cars make compromises in one area or another.

Enjoy your purchase and welcome to EV driving :)
 

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To answer @John2, mine Always starts the ICE when I floor it, but that's almost always from sub 30 mph speeds. Don't have much experience at higher speeds
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sorry I can't help...but lack of acceleration was one of the reasons I didn't go for the Outlander. I think the published 0-60 is about 11 secs so I just put it down to being a big ol' lump of car.
Big is good for Ikea!
0-60 times are probably worked out in hyperoptimal conditions to impress journalists and buyers, but if you are interested in the foul weather performance and driving experience I would hope that the 4WD and extra weight will deliver decent traction to leave lighter leaner cars behind, and that the higher driving position will give better visibility.
I test drove the i3 in poor weather and it was quite happy to lose traction. It wasn't much fun in the rain (but fabulous when dry).
 

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I take your point, but being a Zoe owner, you know what I'm getting at with the EV grin. Had a go in one at the weekend and the 'off the mark' performance in a small car was great fun.
 
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The Outlander's acceleration depends on the battery's SOC. If below 30% "empty", the PHEV relies more on the generator and less torque is available at higher speeds. When SOC is higher, it uses both and performance improves noticeably. That's why the manual says to save battery power for long hills and towing. The same can be said regarding acceleration.
 

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I'm surprised by the number of people blaming the Outlanders weight when it is only about 80kg heavier than the Ampera, depending on equipment level.
The Outlander uses only the electric motors for drive up to 42 mph therefore is limited to the max rating of the motors for pulling away at roundabouts. The Outlanders combined max motor rating is 120 kw which compared to the Amperas 111kW motor rating isn't bad. However the small battery size on the Outlander means the software limits the max draw from the battery to about 60 kW and then supplements it with generated power. This is the lag you are probably seeing as the software engages the clutches and drag starts the engine to generate the extra electric power needed.
Also at higher speeds up to about 75mph there can be a lag when you floor it to overtake as the Outlander drops out of direct drive mode back onto generator/ electric mode and there is quite a bit of clutch swapping and speed syncronisation to do. This is pretty much the same as when you floor the Ampera from a 60+ cruise and is something you learn to allow for.
Once the Outlander has sorted itself out and changed modes I find the acceleration to be superb and not much different to the Ampera. It seems to accelerate much quicker than the Discoverys I've driven and even feels quicker than my old 150hp Xtrail.
Are you using all of the throttle travel ie. past the kickdown detent at about 90% travel?
 

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The PHEV Technical manual states the following on page 25:

"Above is an example of the torque generated by the electrical motors compared with
Outlander 13MY Petrol 4J11 with a manual transmission.
In the case of a low SOC in drive battery, the Outlander petrol has an advantage above
~50km/h. Below 50km/h the Outlander PHEV has much more torque.
The advise that must be given to Customers is to save drive battery energy or to push
the battery charge button for better performance before climbing a hill while towing a
trailer. This is mentioned in the Owner Manual in chapter 7 - Starting and driving.
When the drive battery SOC is kept higher (over 30%), the lower table is applicable and
then the Outlander PHEV has much more torque available over the full range from 40 to
66 km/h."

As for the tables mentioned, I haven't a clue how to cut and paste them from the PDF.
 
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