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171.6kW max power? That's 230bhp! No wonder it's quick :)
That figure will be maximum instantaneous power output allowed from the battery as limited by the BMS.

That includes ancillary loads including heater, A/C, DC-DC inverter that charges the 12v battery and (effectively) runs 12v accessories like power steering etc...

Also keep in mind that this figure is power before the motor and drive inverter so doesn't include losses in both drive inverter and motor/gearbox. So you won't be getting 171kW at the wheel even if heater etc were turned off.

As a comparison the motor in my Ion is rated at 47kW at the wheel, but the BMS reports maximum possible power output from the battery as 55kW - the "missing" 8kW allows for heater/AC load and drive inverter/motor inefficiencies. The car is able to put out full rated power at the wheel even when the heater is on full consuming 5kW.

The point of this maximum power output figure (and there is also a maximum power input figure) as managed by the BMS is so that when necessary the BMS can lower the cap on the maximum power output/input for example due to state of charge or temperature, and these set limits that the drive inverter aren't allowed to exceed.
 

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Well at my service today I asked for a battery SOH check

They came back and said it was at 100%

Then in the next breath said it was green so would not show anything other than that till it went below 70% which seems bizare

Surely they must be able to see what it actually is. So 100% or Green. Clear as mud
That could be an indicator of the battery warranty threshold (I don't think this is defined anywhere). If everything above 70% is green then maybe they consider this zone a healthy battery.
 

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That could be an indicator of the battery warranty threshold (I don't think this is defined anywhere). If everything above 70% is green then maybe they consider this zone a healthy battery.
Battery warranty is stated at 8 years, 200,000km (120k mi) and 70% remaining capacity for Europe. IIRC Korea and the US are both lifetime warranties (70%). I guess the difference is because Europe has better consumer protection laws anyway, so even if it did fail out of warranty you would likely be able to claim a substantial part of the replacement cost.
 

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Europe has better consumer protection laws anyway, so even if it did fail out of warranty you would likely be able to claim a substantial part of the replacement cost.
Indeed, I know people who've had things like alternators fail on a six year old car several years out of warranty and appealed to the manufacturer who has then contributed to the cost of prematurely replacing a part.
 

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Does anybody obsess about their ICE powered cars and it’s MPG/power output the same way we EV owners obsess about battery power/condition?
Having driven EV vehicles fitted with NiCad batteries for nearly 20 years, I lose zero sleep worrying about their modern LiPo counterparts. They are robust, over engineered and have proved to be more than capable of meeting the longer warranties offered by EV manufacturers, warranties that far exceed any guarantees offered on ICE propelled vehicles.
 

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Does anybody obsess about their ICE powered cars and it’s MPG/power output the same way we EV owners obsess about battery power/condition?
Having driven EV vehicles fitted with NiCad batteries for nearly 20 years, I lose zero sleep worrying about their modern LiPo counterparts. They are robust, over engineered and have proved to be more than capable of meeting the longer warranties offered by EV manufacturers, warranties that far exceed any guarantees offered on ICE propelled vehicles.
Plenty in the ice ecomodder community obsess over mpg!
 

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Does anybody obsess about their ICE powered cars and it’s MPG/power output the same way we EV owners obsess about battery power/condition?
Having driven EV vehicles fitted with NiCad batteries for nearly 20 years, I lose zero sleep worrying about their modern LiPo counterparts. They are robust, over engineered and have proved to be more than capable of meeting the longer warranties offered by EV manufacturers, warranties that far exceed any guarantees offered on ICE propelled vehicles.
I used to be interested in mpg because I like to know what it costs. Now I'm more concerned about having enough range to do what I need for the day, or to get to the next charger.
With our Golf if it degrades too quickly it will need replacing much quicker than we would like to. If it is at 80% capacity in 5 years it will need changing, it won't be much different to driving the 24kWh version. It will still be a very serviceable car, but won't suit or current use. In the past we haven't changed frequently, last car we owned for 9 years.
 

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Pleasantly surprised to see mine's at still 81% (which feels about right) after 2 years
Running a battery test on my Lenovo laptop 15 months old showed 97% capacity. When new I found a battery life extender tab. Sine then the battery has a maximum charge of 58% when plugged in all the time. Since ordering a KONA I have looked around for information on the LI batteries and interestingly found that the military charge LI batteries to 60% to extend life. Apparently it is only good to charge to the 100% if the battery is to be used quickly because oxygen forms at anode and cathode on the fully charged LI battery which causes corrosion which degrades the battery. When I take delivery of my KONA I will try to abide by the above guide lines. With a 64KWH usable battery this will be no problem for me.
 

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@D Holloway - look at the numbers in this report : Battery charging: Full versus Partial - PushEVs

The second chart is the most interesting one. In here we see how many charge/discharge cycles the battery cell can handle before reaching the EOL (End-of-Life) – 70 % of the initial battery capacity – in different scenarios.

  • Cycling from 100 to 0 % we get 500 cycles
  • Cycling from 100 to 10 % we get 500 cycles
  • Cycling from 100 to 20 % we get 1.000 cycles
  • Cycling from 90 to 0 % we get 1.500 cycles
  • Cycling from 90 to 10 % we get 1.500 cycles
  • Cycling from 90 to 20 % we get 2.000 cycles
  • Cycling from 80 to 0 % we get 3.000 cycles
  • Cycling from 80 to 10 % we get 3.000 cycles
  • Cycling from 80 to 20 % we get 3.500 cycles
  • Cycling from 70 to 0 % we get 5.000 cycles
  • Cycling from 70 to 10 % we get 5.500 cycles
  • Cycling from 70 to 20 % we get 6.000 cycles
 

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As I do not intend to keep the car past the Hyundai battery warranty period why should I worry?
First thing I'd do before buying a used EV is check the battery health. If you're leasing or PCP, then you don't have to care.
 

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That is a fantastic chart, thanks for that @Kim.T
I surprised that going from 100 -> sub-20 is so bad to the point where you're potentially taking great lumps out of the long term life of the battery by doing long trips
 

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@D Holloway - look at the numbers in this report : Battery charging: Full versus Partial - PushEVs

The second chart is the most interesting one. In here we see how many charge/discharge cycles the battery cell can handle before reaching the EOL (End-of-Life) – 70 % of the initial battery capacity – in different scenarios.

  • Cycling from 100 to 0 % we get 500 cycles
  • Cycling from 100 to 10 % we get 500 cycles
  • Cycling from 100 to 20 % we get 1.000 cycles
  • Cycling from 90 to 0 % we get 1.500 cycles
  • Cycling from 90 to 10 % we get 1.500 cycles
  • Cycling from 90 to 20 % we get 2.000 cycles
  • Cycling from 80 to 0 % we get 3.000 cycles
  • Cycling from 80 to 10 % we get 3.000 cycles
  • Cycling from 80 to 20 % we get 3.500 cycles
  • Cycling from 70 to 0 % we get 5.000 cycles
  • Cycling from 70 to 10 % we get 5.500 cycles
  • Cycling from 70 to 20 % we get 6.000 cycles
Bear in mind 100 and 0 percent on the dash are not always the same on the cells. The manufacturer's build in some margin to be able to guarantee the battery pack.
 

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Wealth of Li battery info here - batteryuniversity.com/learn/.
At the higher charge and lower discharge levels, battery chemical reactions become permanent. I only charge my mobile battery to 76% and recharge at about 40% - with a 4000mah battery that is a day's use.
 

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Bear in mind 100 and 0 percent on the dash are not always the same on the cells. The manufacturer's build in some margin to be able to guarantee the battery pack.
Except that we often don’t know exactly how much that is, in effect we are guessing.

Simple fact is charging to 100% takes you closer to the top end of charge and running it to 0% is taking you to bottom end. For most of 20-80% is plenty for day to day use.

I have calculated that my 100% charge is down 5% over 61,000 miles and 3.5 years, which I feel is ok. I never charge to 100% unless I am heading off in the car shortly after charging it to that ie 30 mins or so.
 

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Except that we often don’t know exactly how much that is, in effect we are guessing.

Simple fact is charging to 100% takes you closer to the top end of charge and running it to 0% is taking you to bottom end. For most of 20-80% is plenty for day to day use.

I have calculated that my 100% charge is down 5% over 61,000 miles and 3.5 years, which I feel is ok. I never charge to 100% unless I am heading off in the car shortly after charging it to that ie 30 mins or so.
Using the various OBD2 interfaces available it's easy to see the pack voltage. Assuming 4.2V per cell is typically full. Multiply by the number of cells in series and you get the theoretical max voltage.
Some apps like Torque give the BMS state of charge and "Dashboard" state of charge. 95% and 100% on Ioniq for example.

Remember that it's good practice to charge to full, and hold for a few hours to balance cells occasionally too.
 

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Then in the next breath said it was green so would not show anything other than that till it went below 70% which seems bizare

Surely they must be able to see what it actually is. So 100% or Green. Clear as mud
So we will start seeing OBD reporting 70% SOH on Hyundais when it actually drops to 70%. That will be interesting! :)
But surely there must be some high mileage Ioniqs that should be in this range? The highest report I have seen was 70.000km and stil at 100%.
 

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I have my Kona since 6/28 and already drove over 11000 miles. Still charges to 100% and range is the same as when I got it. About 320 miles at 100% and 250 miles at 80% SoC. That number goes down after longer high speed road trips but goes back to that after a week of commuting.
 

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So we will start seeing OBD reporting 70% SOH on Hyundais when it actually drops to 70%. That will be interesting! :)
But surely there must be some high mileage Ioniqs that should be in this range? The highest report I have seen was 70.000km and stil at 100%.
They probably learnt from Renault that if you actually let people see the real data they might complain when it starts to drop. I suspect the ODB data says 100% SOH if it is actually above 70% ;)
 
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