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The reason why car manufacturers don't recommend the 13 amp charging is that the normal 10 amp granny cables use that power continuously and any poor connection, corrosion, tarnish, aged fuses etc can cause overheating and the connectors to melt. This is especially true if using old extension cables or old dirty sockets in the garage.

I'd recommend buying a switchable granny cable that will do 6 amps charging (e.g. the one from 3rd Rock). This reduces the current so as not to stress the electrics so highly. Check that none of the connectors are getting too warm after about 5 minutes.

I'm sat in a hotel in the Malverns and my car has been charging at 6 amps overnight connected on an extension cable into the hotel storage room next to my room. Now fully charged and ready to go. The hotel were very happy to allow this, for no cost.
 

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The reason why car manufacturers don't recommend the 13 amp charging is that the normal 10 amp granny cables use that power continuously and any poor connection, corrosion, tarnish, aged fuses etc can cause overheating and the connectors to melt. This is especially true if using old extension cables or old dirty sockets in the garage.

I'd recommend buying a switchable granny cable that will do 6 amps charging (e.g. the one from 3rd Rock). This reduces the current so as not to stress the electrics so highly. Check that none of the connectors are getting too warm after about 5 minutes.

I'm sat in a hotel in the Malverns and my car has been charging at 6 amps overnight connected on an extension cable into the hotel storage room next to my room. Now fully charged and ready to go. The hotel were very happy to allow this, for no cost.
Or, you can set the charge current in the car. It has 3 levels; Maximum, Reduced, or Minimum. :)
 

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Hi All. I am new to this forum and hope to get some advice, Thank you in advance
I am hoping to get a Kona very soon (test drive tomorrow).
I often drive and stay overnight at friends who only have domestic 13amp sockets, so I want to top up my car using the Kona domestic charging cable whilst away. (I know its slow)
Hyundai say this is only for emergency use and could invalidate the warranty. (I will get the Pod point for home use)
If this is true it could be a deal breaker for me.
Does anyone with a Kona have any advice please
I have a kona and have had absolutely no issues using granny charger. Yes it's slow but it's never been any bother. I have a decent quality socket in my garage. Good advice about giving your friends a bottle of vino de collapso
Hi All. I am new to this forum and hope to get some advice, Thank you in advance
I am hoping to get a Kona very soon (test drive tomorrow).
I often drive and stay overnight at friends who only have domestic 13amp sockets, so I want to top up my car using the Kona domestic charging cable whilst away. (I know its slow)
Hyundai say this is only for emergency use and could invalidate the warranty. (I will get the Pod point for home use)
If this is true it could be a deal breaker for me.
Does anyone with a Kona have any advice please
I have a kona and have absolutely no worries about using the granny charger, in fact they recomend you DON'T use DC fast chargers all the time, if you do, they recomend plugging into a slower AC charger about once a month to balance the battery cells for longer life.
I have a good quality electric socket in my garage. I would recomend taking a bottle of vino de collapso or box of choccies to your friend, its a decent thing to do for letting you have some electrons. By the way, you'll love the Kona, it's a great car and lovely place to be in. Regards Brian
 

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Thanks all for your great advice, actually did a test drive today and then purchased the Kona Premium 64kWh. Looking forward to getting it but got to wait until March 2022
Well done, you'll love it. There's a lot of superb advice on here and some really really knowledgeable people. (Jeremy Harris for one). Best wishes to all. Brian
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I have a kona and have had absolutely no issues using granny charger. Yes it's slow but it's never been any bother. I have a decent quality socket in my garage. Good advice about giving your friends a bottle of vino de collapso

I have a kona and have absolutely no worries about using the granny charger, in fact they recomend you DON'T use DC fast chargers all the time, if you do, they recomend plugging into a slower AC charger about once a month to balance the battery cells for longer life.
I have a good quality electric socket in my garage. I would recomend taking a bottle of vino de collapso or box of choccies to your friend, its a decent thing to do for letting you have some electrons. By the way, you'll love the Kona, it's a great car and lovely place to be in. Regards Brian
Hi Brian. Thank you for the tips. I am probably going to cover about 5000 miles per year, Do you think that I only need a granny charger or should I go for a pod point or similar in your opinion. Thanks
 

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Hi Brian. Thank you for the tips. I am probably going to cover about 5000 miles per year, Do you think that I only need a granny charger or should I go for a pod point or similar in your opinion. Thanks
If you drive the 5000 miles in a month, I would go with a dedicated charger. But if you are rarely using the full range you're probably just fine with the grant charger. I drive 10000 miles per year only using granny charger, no problem. Just a little planning ahead.
 

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Hi Brian. Thank you for the tips. I am probably going to cover about 5000 miles per year, Do you think that I only need a granny charger or should I go for a pod point or similar in your opinion. Thanks
Agree with the dedicated charger if you can. It's worth doing ASAP before the UK Government Grant finishes for houses in March 2022.

I've ordered a 64kWh Kona Premium (also March!) and I've got a Hypervolt charger fitted at home waiting for it.

Benefits I see are at least twofold:
  • Future-proofs the house
  • Allows for smart scheduling in the charger so you can take advantage of the cheaper rates at night
 

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Hi Brian. Thank you for the tips. I am probably going to cover about 5000 miles per year, Do you think that I only need a granny charger or should I go for a pod point or similar in your opinion. Thanks
Phew that's a question, its a matter of personal choice and needs there's no simple answer really. I've covered almost 7000 miles in the last 6 months and haven't needed a home point charger, going by a lot of the issues I've seen on various discussion groups they can be more problematical in the long term because they are controlled via computer chip and WiFi, unless you get the very simple version which is just plug n charge.
However....the simple plug n charge versions don't qualify for the govt grant cos the govt want some control over your charger in the event of either power outages or civil unrest, hence the only charging points for home that attract the grant have to have a sim card and access given to a third party supplier. You can't beat just plugging it into the 13amp socket, that will never need rebooting or updating and of course if for example pod point or whoever looks after your home charging point ceases trading, what happens then? Its really whether you need the convenience of faster charging at home. Oh and I forgot a big benefit is, with a home charger fitted you can set its timer (you can set a timer on your car from the infotainment screen as well) to take advantage of using cheap nighttime electricity at 5 to 7p per kwh, typically from midnight to 5am or sometimes longer, but only if you have the tarrif (I think most suppliers are no longer offering them tho). and you have to have a smart meter installed if you haven't already got one.
 

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The salesperson is full of ignorant BS. Ignore the "bold advice".

The granny charger is all I use to top up either via solar during the day or off the regular supply at any time as necessary. As others have said, check for hot plugs and sockets. If no hotter than mildly warm, all ok. It's a 10 amp load - as far as your house wiring is concerned it's exactly the same as a portable electric room heater.

Beats me why the Hyundai advice is that the supplied charger is intended for emergency use only. Perhaps because it is impractically slow if you're a high mileage user. BTW its charging rate is about 15km per hour. (Aussie figures based on 10 amps at 240V). A 10 hour overnight charge will give you back about 150km, so if your daily drive is less than that an expensive fixed EVSE may not be necessary.
Aussie and NZ plugs don't suffer from the overheating issues as the BS plugss (with their fuses).
 

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It's not the domestic supply precisely to blame but using the onboard charger incurs fixed losses in addition to the expected variable losses that vary with power. As a result total losses are higher proportional to power at lower charging levels.

On 230VAC 8A I've measured a total efficiency of around 82% compared with the Hyundai-specced 91% efficiency which should be obtainable at 32A. It also worth noting that some power during the first 30 minutes is used to charge the 12V battery.

As for AU/NZ plugs, what I've seen is that EV chargers that can be set up to 10A have a temperature sensor built into the plug to cater for deteriorated sockets.
 

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It's not the domestic supply precisely to blame but using the onboard charger incurs fixed losses in addition to the expected variable losses that vary with power. As a result total losses are higher proportional to power at lower charging levels.

On 230VAC 8A I've measured a total efficiency of around 82% compared with the Hyundai-specced 91% efficiency which should be obtainable at 32A. It also worth noting that some power during the first 30 minutes is used to charge the 12V battery.

As for AU/NZ plugs, what I've seen is that EV chargers that can be set up to 10A have a temperature sensor built into the plug to cater for deteriorated sockets.
Exactly. Well put. My point being that on a 7kw wall charger you will have an efficiency of about 8to 10% better than a granny charger. Having said that it's not a lot of cost if you are doing fairly low miles.
 

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This is part of a conversation I had with the Salesperson, Bold type is their reply
Ok I understand, but will it damage the car if I use the domestic cable on a regular basis ? it could well do if you used it all the time, don't do anything that could damage the car and ruin the warranty! Does it actually say in the warranty that I am not allowed to use the domestic charge Looking forward to the test drive tomorrow it tells you in the hand book not to do it. I have spoken to the tech guys and they also say its to be used only in emergency. Id have to check the warranty wording (not in front of me) . who are you seeing here tomorrow? im sure they can help
and on the Website its does say
"KONA Electric is equipped with an in-cable control box charging cable that you can plug right into a normal wall socket. This charging cable is intended for emergency use only."

But I am not at all worried now after reading the advice from this thread. Thanks
I’m afraid I‘m the guy who would have had a word with his manager after that conversation: utter 🐂💩!!

As many have said: simply check the plug after a while to make sure the house wiring wasn‘t done by Ronny Bodgit: that is the main ‘risk’.
If you have an extension lead, ensure it is 13A rated (most are), & uncoil the whole length if it is a retractable one.

Obviously be sure to recompense your friends for how much power you are stealing: likely through wine or beer for many, I’m sure 🍻👍
If they are on a terrible tariff, worst case scenario is perhaps you drive 200 miles to them, fill up with perhaps 55kW of juice. On our current tariff (13.5p), that’s £7. Our cheap rate would pop half of that in at 5p/kW….an expensive one (30p/kW 🤷‍♂️) could hit £15, I guess.
It’s actually a nice way to have a conversation about energy costs with them if they aren’t familiar with EVs. 200miles in my diesel Volvo, 35mpg, needs over 5 gallons of smelly juice: over 25 litres…,currently over £1.40/l means it would cost over £35, in comparison 😜

Finally….the ‘chargepoint‘ we have available at the IOW holiday cottage in my signature….is a 3-pin outside plug🤣. Been used by a couple of guests since we put it in: fact is people would struggle to drive much over a few hundred miles on holiday (I would hope!), so just a cost we absorb!
 
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